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BEST TO BEGIN WITH



 
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monsieurjoko
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Joined: 17 May 2017
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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 12:42 pm    Post subject: BEST TO BEGIN WITH Reply with quote

Hi to the community! I'm new to brass instruments but very passionate and ready to plunge onto this very exciting new musical world. Having in the past played clarinet, flute and mandoline - I know a little bit about music. But now, I want to concentrate on one instrument and try to master it.

I want to start class with the cornet, for various reasons, but I want to know your insights. Got few questions here :

A pocket cornet (trumpet) is a good idea?
Something else than cornet to start?
Models that you can propose for a beginner?
I love very intricate jazz feel to brass but also the mellow sound, what's in between?

Thank you!


Last edited by monsieurjoko on Fri May 19, 2017 5:18 pm; edited 2 times in total
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll address the first, last. What is a jazz sound?

Regarding the horns you list, I have them all. There is no best beginner horn. Whatever you want to play is what you should play. There are a few consideration, though.

If you intend to play in an ensemble there's the question of matching sounds with the other players. It shouldn't matter if you're in a beginner/intermediate situation, and some players can fit a trumpet into a cornet section and the opposite.

And regarding pocket trumpet check out the grip. Some are more "friendly" than others.

Generally speaking, cornet is a little more reserved a sound than trumpets although YMMV.

Otherwise, just get what you want and have fun.
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dstdenis
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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi monsieurjoko, and welcome!

A pocket cornet (trumpet) is a good idea? I'd say just get a cornet, rather than a pocket cornet or pocket trumpet, unless you really need something super-compact for packing and travel.

Something else than cornet to start? If you're interested in cornet, go with it. It's a fine instrument, and you can have lots of fun playing all sorts of music with it as you develop your skills.

Models that you can propose for a beginner? I'd suggest beginner or intermediate models from Yamaha, Getzen, or Kanstul. Used, if you can find one. If possible, get an experienced player to play-test and inspect it for you.

I love very intricate jazz feel to brass but also the mellow sound, what's in between? I'll just say that, regardless of the instrument you choose, you'll have opportunities to play a variety of music that calls for a variety of sound qualities. If you're playing a happy tune, you want to sound bright and lively. If you're playing a sad tune, you want to sound dark, mellow and somber. Don't get stuck on just one sound--learn how to play across the range of sounds that express these emotions. A good cornet and mouthpiece combination will help you do that.
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monsieurjoko
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Joined: 17 May 2017
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Location: Quebec City

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
What is a jazz sound?

I meant something intricate, not just jazz (that can be very smooth tho) but also classical like Bach pieces for trumpets.

Thank you for your very fast responses!


Last edited by monsieurjoko on Fri May 19, 2017 5:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Dennis78
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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bach cr310 works well for me
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Bflatman
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A pocket trumpet is not a good idea
Cornet is great to start - Trumpet is great too
I recommend a Yamaha student cornet great sound great instrument
A good instrument will allow you to explore your musical taste and make any genre of music a joy.

You like rich mellow tones, a cornet will give you those.

If you get a cornet, then in a few months get a trumpet to expand your playing options and allow greater participation in ensembles and more chance to blend with other players.
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zaferis
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree, stay away from the pocket instruments (novelties).. if you're serious, my suggestion is a decent trumpet - I love cornet, and there are some definite benefits to starting on one (especially so for young/small kids) but a trumpet is the modern instrument for us.

With a musical background - i suggest starting with an intermediate or better instrument...

Bach 37, Yamaha pro series, Xeno, Getzen, etc...

it you're stuck on the cornet idea.. Getzen Eterna, Bach 184, Yamaha 63xx or even the 2310..

And then take a half dozen lessons. Get a good solid start, ideas of what and how to practice, and then at least some periodic lessons to avoid those common pitfalls.

have fun
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monsieurjoko
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, those posts answers my questions quite completely! Thanks for your support and I'll let you know my choice!

Have a nice one!
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1jazzyalex
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 10:13 pm    Post subject: Re: BEST TO BEGIN WITH Reply with quote

monsieurjoko wrote:
Hi to the community! I'm new to brass instruments but very passionate and ready to plunge onto this very exciting new musical world.


Find your area's local, reputable, music store. Rent a trumpet or a cornet, and sign up for some lessons.

The rental will cost you about $30 a month, lessons about $30 per half-hour, the "band book" will cost you $10 at most, the "care kit" with things like a snake and valve oil will come with the horn, and this, in my book, is by far the best way to give this stuff a try.

Most music stores will allow you to apply your first year's rental fees toward buying a horn, and you can simply buy the horn you've been renting, or buy something else from the store.
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monsieurjoko
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 7:14 am    Post subject: Re: BEST TO BEGIN WITH Reply with quote

1jazzyalex wrote:
Find your area's local, reputable, music store. Rent a trumpet or a cornet, and sign up for some lessons.


That's exactly what I'm doing today!
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A couple of observations.

Renting an instrument with the option to buy may be your best bet if you're unsure, but know that it may not be the best option, financially. If you decide not to play trumpet, then all you have to do is return the horn to the music store. But if you keep it, know that the selling price they apply to the horn, if you've been renting, is often higher than if you just bought the horn outright.

Also, the cost of the book - I don't know, sight unseen - how much that will actually cost. If you just get one beginner's book, it could be at a nominal cost. But if you have a teacher, the first book may be larger (Arban or St. Jacome) with a thought toward continuing study. Also, such a teacher may ask you to get a couple of books. Simple need, cheap. More complex need, perhaps more costly.

I'm not saying simplicity is wrong. Just pointing out that your initial outlay for beginning material could be a little more costly. Just something you should be aware of.
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"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis."
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Crazy Finn
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
Renting an instrument with the option to buy may be your best bet if you're unsure, but know that it may not be the best option, financially. If you decide not to play trumpet, then all you have to do is return the horn to the music store. But if you keep it, know that the selling price they apply to the horn, if you've been renting, is often higher than if you just bought the horn outright.

Music stores often have an introductory rental fee that is quite low. That allows the students to try band (or orchestra) for a fairly reasonable fee that increases after that period - often say 4-6 months. If this is the case - I have no idea, since I don't know your local music store - then this is an excellent deal that will give you an opportunity to see if trumpet is for and and some time to find a good used instrument.

A used trumpet or cornet, student or otherwise is an excellent deal. Getting a good horn for less than $200 with maybe another $75 for a shop clean and fix-up is a superb deal compared to any random e-Deal (with iffy quality and unknown origin) or full retail price on a student horn from a local shop.
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crazy Finn wrote:
Music stores often have an introductory rental fee that is quite low. That allows the students to try band (or orchestra) for a fairly reasonable fee that increases after that period - often say 4-6 months. If this is the case - I have no idea, since I don't know your local music store - then this is an excellent deal that will give you an opportunity to see if trumpet is for and and some time to find a good used instrument.


Yes. The point I am trying to make is just that if you rent-to-buy the music store might value the horn at, say, $600.00, while you might get them to price it lower, say $585.00, if you bought it cash-on-the-spot. I'm sure it depends on the store. But something to consider and ask about.

Also, the music store's assortment might be limited, making you compromise your choice. Again, that's not always true, but just something to consider, as well.
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You can't blow it if you haven't lived it.

"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis."
Chet Baker

Benge 3X
Schilke B6
Martin Committee (1956)
Connstellation 38B (1959)
Hans Hoyer G10 French Horn
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VetPsychWars
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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're truly serious, then this is a case of getting the best instrument you can afford. Life's too short to learn to play on a crappy instrument. I was lucky that I was given a Buescher 400 trumpet to learn on, which would be a good jazz horn as well. But the horn matters less than your facility, which is going to take some years of hard work.

But the work is harder on a horn and mouthpiece combination that is difficult to play.

This is place where a trumpet teacher to get you startted can be quite useful.

Tom
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