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razeontherock
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vin DiBona wrote:
One thing that is certain and that is there are very few in the world who are qualified for that chair.
R. Tomasek


Wait, I have read enough on TH to realize it is all about the equipment. So, the winner will be playing the Yamaha Chicago
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roccotrumpetsiffredi
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What can the winner of the audition expect to earn assuming a 2 year trial? I suppose the CSO minimum + some percentage?

Assuming all goes well and a full time position is awarded, would the pay be significantly greater than during the trial?

Mutti makes millions, no? You figure they could pay the top bugler pretty well.

Is it possible that some principal members make north of $300/400/500 per year?

Does it depend on instrument?
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snichols
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

roccotrumpetsiffredi wrote:
What can the winner of the audition expect to earn assuming a 2 year trial? I suppose the CSO minimum + some percentage?

Assuming all goes well and a full time position is awarded, would the pay be significantly greater than during the trial?

Mutti makes millions, no? You figure they could pay the top bugler pretty well.

Is it possible that some principal members make north of $300/400/500 per year?

Does it depend on instrument?


Probably not. I would speculate in the 200s somewhere. 300s max. Yes, the music director can make 7 figures, but the concert master is going to be the next highest earner with the other principals following. There's probably someone here that can speak to it more accurately...
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Andy Del
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrClean wrote:
Maybe, but most players do not have every piece in the repertoire at "audition level" at all times. It is really difficult to keep 40 or more plates spinning at one time, particularly when the list is general and not specific passages. You end up with a huge list played pretty well instead of a reasonable list played exceptionally well. One theory for the long list is to discourage weaker or inexperienced players from applying, but you may end up weeding out great players that have jobs that preclude them from simultaneously working up an enormous list while performing the duties of their current job. If you are thoughtful enough in constructing a list, you can quickly determine the quality of the candidate. The CSO has a couple of strategic excerpts on this list to identify the players most qualified for this job, but they've also given folks a shot at making a great impression by not making the list oppressively long. Given this strategy, "pretty good" isn't going to cut it. Everything is going to have to be excellent or better.


This is quite true, but I remember an associate principal audition for a local orchestra when I was in college. The except list was pretty big: about 30 excerpts! So many, that during a lesson ( I was having with the principal trumpet) another colleague dropped by to ask (complain) (have a whine) about how many excerpts there were.

I vividly recall my teacher arranging some 5 trumpets around him, and then proceeding to play each excerpt in order, along with a brief commentary on what he expected to hear. It was note perfect. The explanations were crystal clear as well.

Wish I could do that with... well, any list!

cheers

Andy
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roccotrumpetsiffredi
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

snichols wrote:
roccotrumpetsiffredi wrote:
What can the winner of the audition expect to earn assuming a 2 year trial? I suppose the CSO minimum + some percentage?

Assuming all goes well and a full time position is awarded, would the pay be significantly greater than during the trial?

Mutti makes millions, no? You figure they could pay the top bugler pretty well.

Is it possible that some principal members make north of $300/400/500 per year?

Does it depend on instrument?


Probably not. I would speculate in the 200s somewhere. 300s max. Yes, the music director can make 7 figures, but the concert master is going to be the next highest earner with the other principals following. There's probably someone here that can speak to it more accurately...


Thanks for the reply. I recall reading Phil Smith was making approx 385k towards the end of his career, perhaps some article. The few recent articles I've read simply say principals can make a lot more.

Is there a way to look this up on a publicly available source?

Cheers
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sweet-ribs chamberlain
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since American orchestras are all non-profit organizations their tax returns are publicly available. Try looking the form 990 for your favorite orchestra. The top 10 paid non-administration positions are listed. I use guidestar for this.

Sweet-ribs
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DH
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

roccotrumpetsiffredi wrote:
Is there a way to look this up on a publicly available source?
Cheers


Yes. I believe it's IRS form 990. Non-profit groups are required to file and this is public information. What I've found online is generally a year or two behind.

One item listed is the 5 highest paid members of the organization. I seem to recall looking at NY Phil and those 5 included Concertmaster, Phil Myers, Phil Smith (don't recall the other two). If principal trumpet isn't in the top 5 it's not available on that form
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RandyTX
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw this elsewhere and couldn't resist about the CSO opening. I couldn't figure out an incantation to make the forum software render it inline, but here's a link.

https://scontent-dft4-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/18198478_10156031298328362_65746797011710733_n.jpg?oh=3e32f39de13cf6b65b02d1b2a8e7e8b6&oe=5975C943
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roccotrumpetsiffredi
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DH wrote:
roccotrumpetsiffredi wrote:
Is there a way to look this up on a publicly available source?
Cheers


Yes. I believe it's IRS form 990. Non-profit groups are required to file and this is public information. What I've found online is generally a year or two behind.

One item listed is the 5 highest paid members of the organization. I seem to recall looking at NY Phil and those 5 included Concertmaster, Phil Myers, Phil Smith (don't recall the other two). If principal trumpet isn't in the top 5 it's not available on that form


Thanks
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roccotrumpetsiffredi
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PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2017 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone know how many contestants are entered in this trumpet decathalon?
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George Coble
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PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2017 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Concerning the mention by Jaysonr- “It’d be cool to see Phil Smith in the chair…”

The last time I talked to Phil about the principal chair in the Chicago Symphony, his only comment was a cryptic “They have mighty cold winters there….”

Take this with the simple truth that retirement is a totally underestimated state of nirvana. Combine with this are the facts that once one has the chance to step away from practicing all those many hours every day for year after year, adding to that the ongoing onslaught of continuously brutal orchestral programming, following that with the guarantee of the day to day unkindnesses found in a typically competitive brass section one doubts that anyone would go through the process of retirement only to hop right back into the frypan. Fortunately, Phil Smith’s golden toned legacy has been assured for decades and one can absolutely believe he has payed his last (and final) union work dues.

There are precious few trumpeters available who could adequately cover the immense responsibility inherent with the Chicago Symphony’s storied principal trumpet position. And, it is likely this process will take some time………

Good luck to all.

George Coble
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MrClean
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PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2017 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andy Del wrote:
MrClean wrote:
Maybe, but most players do not have every piece in the repertoire at "audition level" at all times. It is really difficult to keep 40 or more plates spinning at one time, particularly when the list is general and not specific passages. You end up with a huge list played pretty well instead of a reasonable list played exceptionally well. One theory for the long list is to discourage weaker or inexperienced players from applying, but you may end up weeding out great players that have jobs that preclude them from simultaneously working up an enormous list while performing the duties of their current job. If you are thoughtful enough in constructing a list, you can quickly determine the quality of the candidate. The CSO has a couple of strategic excerpts on this list to identify the players most qualified for this job, but they've also given folks a shot at making a great impression by not making the list oppressively long. Given this strategy, "pretty good" isn't going to cut it. Everything is going to have to be excellent or better.


This is quite true, but I remember an associate principal audition for a local orchestra when I was in college. The except list was pretty big: about 30 excerpts! So many, that during a lesson ( I was having with the principal trumpet) another colleague dropped by to ask (complain) (have a whine) about how many excerpts there were.

I vividly recall my teacher arranging some 5 trumpets around him, and then proceeding to play each excerpt in order, along with a brief commentary on what he expected to hear. It was note perfect. The explanations were crystal clear as well.

Wish I could do that with... well, any list!

cheers

Andy


No offense, Andy, but I can do pretty much the same thing in the safety of my practice room, too. That does not make me audition (or performance) ready. Doing it on stage for an audition committee or a paying audience is another matter entirely. You've got to get it to where it is great under the worst of circumstances.
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FTee
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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrClean wrote:
No offense, Andy, but I can do pretty much the same thing in the safety of my practice room, too. That does not make me audition (or performance) ready. Doing it on stage for an audition committee or a paying audience is another matter entirely. You've got to get it to where it is great under the worst of circumstances.


This is 1000% correct.
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