• FAQ  • Search  • Memberlist  • Usergroups   • Register   • Profile  • Log in to check your private messages  • Log in 

Time for a new trumpet - advice welcomed


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> Horns
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
cbtj51
Regular Member


Joined: 24 Nov 2015
Posts: 62
Location: Deep South

PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HERMOKIWI wrote:
The OP's stated desire is essentially for a "Holy Grail" horn... If a player wants very specific sonic results there is no adequate substitute for using the right tool for each job, the tool that is designed to meet all of the player's sonic requirements. There is no trumpet that can be the best of everything.


+1
FWIW, with my limited knowledge of horn construction and sound characteristics, this assessment seems to be spot on in so many ways. My personal experience is governed by my specific performance requirements and so far, I have been able to get the results I have been looking for with a few different setups depending on the job requirements (this has not been devoid of much trial and error). If I have a consistent need for yet another setup, I'll doggedly pursue a solution when it happens. I would make the assumption that this approach dictates most performer and equipment evolution as well or there would not be so many horn, mouthpiece, accessory and modification variations that actually are marketed and sold on a regular basis.
_________________
No reserve, No retreat, No regret. W W Borden

1971 LA Benge (very Early) 5X Bb Trumpet
1976 Getzen 595S Flugelhorn
1976 Bach Stradivarius CL 229 C Trumpet
1984 Yamaha 6335S (very Early) Bb Trumpet
2016 Bach Stradivarius New York 7 Bb Trumpet
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Louise Finch
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 10 Aug 2012
Posts: 3719
Location: Suffolk, England

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:46 am    Post subject: Re: Time for a new trumpet - advice welcomed Reply with quote

Turkle wrote:
Howdy, folks.

As a reward to myself for paying off my last student loan (I'm now 100% debt-free!), I'm going to buy myself a new trumpet!

I have been playing my 8310zs for about 10 years as my daily driver. I play primarily jazz, and regularly do rock band and extremely small-time theater stuff. I also perform classical a few times a year. So I need a Bb that does it all. The Yamaha Shew has a gorgeous tone and is fantastically easy to play, and is incredibly in tune. But its slotting is so loose it's really pretty bad for classical and other work where pinpoint precision is mandatory. It's great for jazz and blues expression, but I don't trust the horn in the most demanding situations.

Here is what I'm looking for:

1) Lightweight - not negotiable! I am done with heavy horns for good!
2) Fantastic ease of play - I'm not looking to work hard, folks, I have a day job already
3) Great Slotting. Lightweight horns often have pretty loose slotting. I like that, but I need a horn that's going to "grab" the notes better than the 8310zs. As tight slotting as I can get on a lightweight horn, basically.
4) Versatility - must be able to play in any situation from small-group jazz to classical to loud rock stuff. From smokey and low to screaming and loud. From the blues to jazz to Carnival of Venice to Arutunian.
5) No vintage instruments. I need something shiny and new.

So! What I'd like from you folks is a list of horns I should try. At this point, I know that the Adams A5 (basically a Benge copy) and the Stomvi VRii (lightweight, big-bell) are on my shortlist. What else should I try as I evaluate my next trumpet?



Thanks!


Hi Turkle

This may be a daft question, but is there any reason that you need to replace your existing trumpet?

Is there a possibly of you keeping your existing trumpet, and buying a second trumpet which has more secure slotting.

I'm in the opposite situation to you, having a Xeno II, finding it great for situations where pinpoint precision is mandatory, but wishing that it was looser slotting for Jazz.

If I had the money, I'd buy another trumpet for Jazz, and the 8310Z would be on my list to try.

For classical, I'd say that my Xeno II is very good, and if you were simply asking for suggestions of a second trumpet with more precise slotting, I would suggest adding it to your list of trumpets to try, but I personally don't think that it would do anything else you are personally looking well enough, and would effectively be the anti-8310Z.

Do you really need one trumpet which does it all, or could you add a second one with different playing attributes?

Take care

Lou
_________________
Trumpets:
Yamaha 8335 Xeno II
Bach Strad 180ML/37
B&H Oxford
- James R New Custom 3Cs
Flugel:
Bach Strad 183 - Bach 3CFL
Cornets:
Yamaha Xeno
Bach Strad 184ML
B&H Imperial
- Differing Kanstul Custom 3Cs
- Denis Wick 4B underpart/my 3C rim
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BGinNJ
Veteran Member


Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 234

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like the OP wants a magic trumpet! I would like all those things, too, especially "fantastically easy to play".

I tried a used V-Raptor at Dillon's once, great horn, lightweight- but it really seemed like a lead horn, not for classical or "dark & smoky". Also pricey for a used horn, but what's your budget?

I suggest taking the train there from NYC, try a bunch of horns. Just a couple of points- check their list online to narrow down your choices, and the used horns might not be bright & shiny.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Turkle
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 29 Apr 2008
Posts: 1626
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howdy, folks:

Louise, in answer to your questions, I want to buy a new trumpet because I've been playing the same one for 10 years now and I have some money and I want to spend it on something nice! In my experience, playing a new instrument forces us to change some things in our physical, mental, and musical approach, which can help us grow as musicians. I'd never sell the 8310z! I just want another trumpet to play as my main axe.

Specifically, I'm a much stronger player than I was 10 years ago - in better physical shape, way better physical approach to the instrument, and I feel that I've outgrown my horn a little bit. Time to move to a horn that can take a bit more of a muscular approach, eh? Anyway, that's at least what I'm thinking.

BGinNJ, budget is no issue, I have money. I don't want a used horn, I want to buy new. The reason for a thread like this is that sometimes rare horns are very difficult to come by (e.g. V-Raptor) so if they are a good fit then it's worth taking special effort to find them, rather than just buying the first horn that I come across that I like!

The 8310z is a great horn, and it has served me extremely well. But you know how it is! Time for a new axe!

Thanks for the suggestions everyone, I appreciate it! So many horns to try, which is a great "problem" to have... Fortunately, I'm in no hurry.
_________________
'08 Yamaha 8310zs
'62 Connstellation 38B
'64 Connstellation 38A
'94 Bach Strad Bb L 25
'72 Bach Strad Bb ML 37
'72 Bach Strad CML 239
'?? Yamaha YFH-231 Flugel
'38 King Master Cornet
Curry 3.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Louise Finch
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 10 Aug 2012
Posts: 3719
Location: Suffolk, England

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turkle wrote:
Howdy, folks:

Hi Turkle

Louise, in answer to your questions, I want to buy a new trumpet because I've been playing the same one for 10 years now and I have some money and I want to spend it on something nice!

Thank you very much for the clarification.

In my experience, playing a new instrument forces us to change some things in our physical, mental, and musical approach, which can help us grow as musicians.

Maybe, I'm not sure. I'm personally the happiest I've been with my playing, and I put it down to sticking to one trumpet and one cornet, and basically playing a consistent set-up on each.

I'd never sell the 8310z!

I don't blame you.

I just want another trumpet to play as my main axe.

Fair enough and why not.

Specifically, I'm a much stronger player than I was 10 years ago - in better physical shape, way better physical approach to the instrument,

Sounds great!

and I feel that I've outgrown my horn a little bit. Time to move to a horn that can take a bit more of a muscular approach, eh? Anyway, that's at least what I'm thinking.

I'm not so sure about this part, but maybe it is just semantics. You know what you are looking for, which is all that matters.

I'm wondering whether the Schilke B5 or B1 would be a possibility.

Take care

Lou


BGinNJ, budget is no issue, I have money. I don't want a used horn, I want to buy new. The reason for a thread like this is that sometimes rare horns are very difficult to come by (e.g. V-Raptor) so if they are a good fit then it's worth taking special effort to find them, rather than just buying the first horn that I come across that I like!

The 8310z is a great horn, and it has served me extremely well. But you know how it is! Time for a new axe!

Thanks for the suggestions everyone, I appreciate it! So many horns to try, which is a great "problem" to have... Fortunately, I'm in no hurry.

_________________
Trumpets:
Yamaha 8335 Xeno II
Bach Strad 180ML/37
B&H Oxford
- James R New Custom 3Cs
Flugel:
Bach Strad 183 - Bach 3CFL
Cornets:
Yamaha Xeno
Bach Strad 184ML
B&H Imperial
- Differing Kanstul Custom 3Cs
- Denis Wick 4B underpart/my 3C rim
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Bradley
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 28 Jan 2002
Posts: 1118
Location: Kansas City

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try this (currently 15% off) and tell us what you think of it.
Arturo is playing these now and then and it would definitely be something different.

http://www.wwbw.com/daCarbo-Unica-Bb-Trumpet-J45904.wwbw?skuId=site8skuJ45904000001000&rNtt=dacarbo&index=1

The Flip Oakes Celebration (or Wild Thing) is also something you might try. They're fairly lightweight and after playing the Shew horn, which although a very good trumpet is like breathing through a straw, you might feel liberated on the Oakes horn.
_________________
Fides Symphony
Yamaha 8315G flugelhorn
Schilke XA1 cornet
CKB-7C; Kelly 6v(FL)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
jadickson
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 1047
Location: Raleigh, NC

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't read this entire thread, so sorry if it's already been suggested. But the original post made me think of a Schilke B1. I think the B1 checks everything on that list, right?
_________________
Justin Dickson
Middle school band director. Still learning.
www.BandmateTuner.com -- FREE for iOS and Android. The only chromatic tuner app that shows your note on a music staff.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
jengstrom
Veteran Member


Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Posts: 290
Location: Rochester, NY

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turkle, you don't say what kind of classical you play several times a year, but if it's orchestral, shouldn't you look at a horn that will blend in well?

I can't speak for most of the horns suggested, but I can tell you I used to have a 1600, and as much as I loved that horn, its sound didn't come close to working in an orchestral environment. I replaced it with a Bach 72*, which is a real chameleon of a horn.

Like it or not, I think your best bet if any orchestral work is to be had is a Bach or Yamaha (or maybe a Shires). Find the one you like the best. I have used my old 43* for orchestra, and while some will tell you it's too bright for that, it still has a core Bach sound and worked fine. No one ever asked, "Hey, that sounds funny. Is it a 37?"

My 2 cents.

John
_________________
Bach 43*
Bach 72*
Bach Chicago C
Kanstul 1525
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Grits Burgh
Veteran Member


Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 393
Location: South Carolina

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, if money really is no object, why not get two different horns with different personalities? If one new horn is fun, imagine what two new horns would be like.

If you can get a nice Bach or Bach-like horn (Yamaha, Schilke, Shires, Adams, etc.) for classical music, then another type of horn for jazz, you are covered.

I haven't built a huge collection of horns, but I have a couple of different ones for different purposes. I've got an old beater of a student Conn for occasions where I wouldn't want to put a good horn at risk. I have a Bach for classical, a Schilke HC1 for Jazz and a B&S flugelhorn for a change of pace on ballads. I'd love to have a Shires Destine III for big band and lead - except that I can't play lead and I don't have a big band to play in. A piccolo would be nice - except that I can't play a pic. A Bach C trumpet would be nice for that orchestra gig that I have never had and never will. But you get the idea. Different horns work best for different things.

On the other hand, truth be told, I can do everything that I need to do on my Bach. Just don't tell the wife or I'll never be able to add to my collection.

Warm regards,
Grits
_________________
Bach Stradivarius 37 (1971)
Schilke HC 1
B&S 3145 Challenger I Series Flugelhorn
A bunch of mouthpieces, none of which are the right feel, size, depth or sound - except for my Curry 3FLD.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
J-Walk
Veteran Member


Joined: 04 Jan 2008
Posts: 174
Location: Wisconsin

PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Based on tighter slots and lighter weight, I would suggest trying an Schilke S32. The HD series is fantastic, but a bit heavier than standard. The regular S series slots tighter and the horn is very nice in classical and commercial settings. I consider the non HD S-series lightweight.

A Calicchio 1S7 would fit the bill nicely, but can be a little bright in some classical settings. Players that don't muscle their horn around too much can certainly make these blend classically if they are careful. But if you don't back off up high on these, you will stick out in a section.

Though I haven't played one, the Scodwell Boston model would be one I would check out as well.

Best wishes,
_________________
Jason Rahn
-------
-ACB TA1/Schilke S32HD and Schilke CX Trumpets
-Pickett Brass Paul Baron Lead/Calicchio 1S/7 Bb
-Pickett Brass Paul Baron FLs/ Courtois 154 Flugel
-ACB TA1L/Yamaha Custom 915S Picc
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dave CCM/SSO
Regular Member


Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 39
Location: Cincinnati

PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you want to really reward yourself, I'd recommend driving to the Shires factory in MA and having them fit you with your ideal horn. They make absolutely fantastic stuff, in my opinion. It would be really cool to see the factory as well.

Have fun!

Dave
_________________
Dave Zeng

Springfield Symphony Orchestra (OH) - Trumpet 2
- www.springfieldsym.org
Director of Music - First Pres. of Fort Thomas, KY
- www.ftfpc.org
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> Horns All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
Page 3 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group