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The most influential trumpet teacher of all time


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mcstock
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2005 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Derek Reaban wrote:
Matt,

Nat P. would of course be Nat Prager who was the 2nd trumpet in the New York Philharmonic for many years (during Vacchiano's tenure). Wilmer Wise studied with him. I wish he was still posting here to give us some insights about his teaching style.

Go to page 6 of the article about Frank Kaderabek for a picture of Nat Prager.


Derek,
Good guess, but this was someone I'd never heard of before. The last name sounded Italian. Paella? Patella? Potello? Also, isn't Russ a little to young to have studied with Prager? In the new ITG Journal (p. 8 ) Kaderabek mentions that Prager was only 53 when he died, I've never heard the exact year given, but I always thought Prager had died in the mid-60s.

I remember this because before I met Russ I was really impressed by the list of teachers in his bio. A group of us were hanging out after a concert and Russ made the comment that the only two teachers who really helped him, "play the trumpet" were John Coffey and Nat ???

Thanks for your input,
Matt
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Last edited by mcstock on Fri Apr 22, 2005 5:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Mr.Hollywood
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2005 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bernie Glow was a Reinhardt student. I have several old ads for Reinhardts teaching studios in NY with Bernies name on them.

Here is an incomplete list of Dr. Donald S Reinhardts more famous students.

TRUMPET:
Ray Wetzel (lead w/ W.Herman, Kenton)
Don Palladino (lead w/ Les Brown, Harry James)
Johnny Madrid
Bud Brisbois
Alec Fila (lead w/ Glenn Miller and others)
Bernie Glow
Stan Mark
Art Depew (now leads the James band)
Doc Cheatam (Doc was a lifetime advocate of Reinhardts)
Nick Travis
Jimmy McPartland
Red Rodney
John Swanna
Wallace Roney
Lin Biviano
Lyn Nicholson
Buddy Childers

TROMBONE:
Dick Nash
Trummy Young
Kai Winding
Quentin "Butter" Jackson
Bill Harris
Ray Conniff
Nelson Riddle
Johnny Mandel
Milt Bernhardt
Trummie Young (lead w/ Jimmy Lunceford, also many years with Louie Armstrong)
Warren Covington
Randy Prucell
Billy Rauch (Billy was the lead bone player with the old "Casa Loma" band, he is generally credited with being the first trombone player to play a high F in the bands theme "Smoke Rings" night after night back in the old radio days)


A few people have mentioned the great John Coffey. Reinhardt and John Coffey where the very best of friends. They went all the way back to the 1920's when they both attended Curtis Insitute together.

Chris
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Derek Reaban
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2005 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt,

I checked the OSM web-site and Russ lists his teachers as: Mel Broiles, Bill Babcock, Vincent Cichowicz, Roger Devuyst, Gerald Goquen, Arnold Jacobs, Nedo Pandolfi, Dr. Reinhardt, Charles Schlueter, William Vacchiano, Roger Voisin.

You mention that you were, ďreally impressed by the list of teachers in his bio.Ē Did he list Nedo Pandolfi in the bio that you read? Iíve heard such great things about James Pandolfi (through David Kraussí talk at the ITG conference last summer), as well as his Dad, Nedo that Iím wondering if that isnít who youíre talking about. Iím just guessing, but is it possible that he said Ned and you thought he said Nat? Just a thought.

Regarding Nat Pragerís death, I have an email message from one of the former players with the NYC Opera at work. He mentioned how everyone in NYC ďshuffledĒ after his death (youíre right about this being in the 1960s). When I find it, Iíll post it here.

Youíre right about Russ studying with Nat Prager. The dates clearly wouldnít work. Iíll be he wasnít even playing trumpet yet in the mid 60s.


Mr. Hollywood,

Add Russ Devuyst to that list of Dr. Reinhardt students!
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Derek Reaban
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt,

This is an email message that I received from Bruce Revesz when I was working on the list for Principal Trumpet players with both the NYC Opera and NYC Ballet Orchestras. He gives some details about how players moved after Nat Prager died (early 1960s).

Quote:

There was a movement of players when Nathan Prager New York Philharmonic 2nd Trumpet passed away suddenly. Carmine Fornatto who was playing 2nd Trumpet at both NYC Opera & Ballet, filled in for the rest of the season and became a regular there. Fred Mills then became 2nd at the opera. When the Ballet moved to Lincoln Center from City Center in 1964, Fred moved up to first and recommended Bruce Revesz as second (they had worked together free-lancing for years). When Fred left in 1968, Ted Weis came back to play 1st at the opera. When the ballet was at Lincoln Center and the opera still at City Center the seasons ran concurrent with each other. However when the opera moved to Lincoln Center in 1997(I believe) we shared the house like was done at City Center. (There always have been two separate Orchestras, one per Company).

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mcstock
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Derek Reaban wrote:
Matt,

I checked the OSM web-site and Russ lists his teachers as: Mel Broiles, Bill Babcock, Vincent Cichowicz, Roger Devuyst, Gerald Goquen, Arnold Jacobs, Nedo Pandolfi, Dr. Reinhardt, Charles Schlueter, William Vacchiano, Roger Voisin.

You mention that you were, ďreally impressed by the list of teachers in his bio.Ē Did he list Nedo Pandolfi in the bio that you read? Iíve heard such great things about James Pandolfi (through David Kraussí talk at the ITG conference last summer), as well as his Dad, Nedo that Iím wondering if that isnít who youíre talking about. Iím just guessing, but is it possible that he said Ned and you thought he said Nat? Just a thought.


Derek,

I suppose it is possible that I miss understood or mis-remembered the name. This would have been somewhere between 1987 and 1990. I didn't know Russ that well. He was playing in Memphis at the time and would come over to Fayetteville AR for about 3 weeks in the summer to play at the festival they held. Russ made an impression on me because he was the first working pro I got to play in a section with. I only took a couple lesson, but he was the first teacher I worked with who could pick up the horn and really play.

Thanks,
Matt
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romey1
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The approach/techniques discussed on the new David Krauss clips on the Yamaha Artist Model site are EXACTLY what Jim Pandolfi discussed in my lessons.

romey

Derek Reaban wrote:
romey,

Just to add some content to your post (and hopefully to get some additional background), Jim Pandolfi was in the trumpet section of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for many years. I donít have any other bio information for him, but would really like to know more if you could post it here.

Based on comments from an earlier discussion, I found that Nedo Pandolfi had been a trumpet player in the Marlboro Festival Orchestra in the 50s. Peter Bond mentioned that Jimís Uncle Roland is a hornist with the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, and his father played both trumpet and horn. Benjamin Brown commented that Nedo Pandolfi played with the National Radio Symphony of Uruguay in the 50s and 60s, so clearly there was a lot of great playing that Jim was exposed to at an early age.

Who did all of these players study with? Iím sure the lineage will go back to familiar names on this Trumpet Tree list.

At least one prominent Jim Pandolfi student is David Krauss.
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Derek Reaban
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Romey,

Thanks for your comment. I really enjoyed everything that David Krauss talked about in the Yamaha video clips. It was so similar to what I heard him present in Denver at the ITG conference last summer.

I loved his approach to the Honneger Intrada. I had worked this up for an audition in 2003 and fell into the trap of volume. His resonant sound filled up the room so easily and with little effort on his part. I thought his recorded sound on those clips was absolutely fantastic (he records extremely well).

Take care,
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mcstock
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2005 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mcstock wrote:
bugleboy wrote:
Doesn't anyone remember John Coffey?


Russ also mentioned another teacher in Boston who had been very helpful, Nat something. I think the last name started with a P. Does this ring any bells with you?

Thanks,
Matt


Well, after some digging, I think I've answered my own question. Does the name Natalo Paella ring a bell for anyone? I just found a short interview with him in the 1986 New York Brass Conference Journal. He was a professor at the University of Lowell and taught something called, "Performance Seminar" in addition to trumpet. Reading the interview, I'm fairly certain this was the teacher Russ was speaking of.

Matt
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PH
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2005 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bugleboy wrote:
Doesn't anyone remember John Coffey?


I was under the impression that Coffey was a trombone player. Is this correct?
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Derek Reaban
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2005 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt,

Here is the bio information that I found for Natalo Paella. And another at the ITG web site with a really good picture.
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bugleboy
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2005 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PH wrote:
I was under the impression that Coffey was a trombone player. Is this correct?


Yes. But he taught trumpet and probably all brasses.
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bugleboy
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2005 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mcstock wrote:
Charly,
Can you tell us a little more about John Coffey? I've read that he was one of Bill Chase's teachers. Russ Devuyst (sp?) also spoke very highly of him.


John Coffey was legendary around Boston circa 50's - 70's (?) I never studied with him but once bought a Bach Strad from him. He had good prices! Don Ellis was one of his more famous students

mcstock wrote:
Russ also mentioned another teacher in Boston who had been very helpful, Nat something. I think the last name started with a P. Does this ring any bells with you?


He might have been referring to Nat Paella, who had been a student of R. Voisin. I did study with Nat.
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DLoeffler
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks as if the list is getting larger and larger so, I want to add my take on it as well.

Two that influenced me greatly were Scott Shelsta and Dennis Edelbrock. Scotty taught me the basics of brass playing. Denny taught me about life and the trumpet.
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John Mohan
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PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2005 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me it was definitely Claude Gordon. Because of him I have a career.

Sincerely,

John Mohan
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Jim Lynch
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PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2005 10:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A couple of local unknowns named Tim and Dan helped me at first. But when I took lessons from Jeff Purtle, I improved dramatically. John Mohan has been a great help via email as well.
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John Mohan
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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad I've been able to help you!

John
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Jeff_Purtle
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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2005 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I definitely would argue that Claude Gordon was and still is the most significant and influencial teacher in the past 100 years.

There are some other names that were mentioned that I highly respect. But, Claude took Herbert L. Clarke's sound teaching and systematized it and organized the general prinicipals in such a way that anyone with half a brain can become a great player.

The proof for my claim is as follows:
Claude's students
The students of Claude's students
The students of Claude's books
Students in all styles of music
Students on all the brass instruments
The volume of students Claude taught with great results
Students that started as very bad players that became great
The lasting results of this teaching that will endure for years to come

I have a partial list of known CG Students here:
http://www.purtle.com/jeff_cg_students.html

There are definitely many more that I don't know of.
At one time Claude taught 7 days a week from 8am until midnight
without even a break for food. Students would bring him his food.
This man was obsessed with teaching and playing unlike anyone.

He was a master teacher in knowing when to talk and when to keep silent. He was always in control of the lesson and there was never any fooling around. You knew when you left the lesson that there was no need to worry and you could learn to be a great player.

In 50 years I believe most of the other names mentioned will be forgotten unlike Claude's.

Jeff
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Blutch
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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2005 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've only skimmed the posts in this thread, but I'm surprised no one has mentioned Arnold Jacobs.

MA
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allstarbugler
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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From "The Best of Ernest S. Williams":

Many of my most talented pupils have been using this routine for years. To mention a few;

Leonard B. Smith, 1st trpt. Detroit Symph; Louis Davidson, 1st trumpet, Cleveland Symph; Raymond Crisara, 1st trpt. Metropolitan Opera House Orchestra; Sidney Beckerman (AKA Sid Baker) 1st trpt, Chicago Symph; James Burke (my teacher) 1st trpt. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra http://www.jfbcornet.com Seymour Rosenfeld, 1st trpt. St. Louis Symph; Gilbert Mitchell, 1st trpt. New Orleans Symph;Milton Davidson, 1st trpt. Dallas Symp; Harold Rehrig, trumpeter Philadelphia Symph; Herbert Eisenberg, trumpeter Dallas Symph; Ned Mahoney, cornet soloist and teacher, New York City; Frank Elsass, Teacher of Trumpet, State teachers College, San Jose, Cal.; Leonard Meretta, Teacher of Trumpet, State Teachers College, Kalamazoo, Michigan; Craig McHenry, Teacher of Trumpet, Ithaca College, New York; B.P.Causey, Teacher of Trumpet, Centenary College, Shreveport, Louisiana; Dale McMickel, NYC, formerly 1st Trumpet with Glenn Miller's Band; Ray Wetzel, 1st Trumpet, Stan Kenton's Band; Don Jacoby, 1st Trumpet, Les Brown's Band and many more.

Bob Nagel was also a student.

During Williams' time, every solo and principle chair of every major orchestra and concert band in the country was held by a Williams student.
With that kind of success, it's not a stretch to say he was the greatest teacher of trumpet.
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Derek Reaban
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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

allstarbugler wrote:
From "The Best of Ernest S. Williams":

...Milton Davidson, 1st trpt. Dallas Symp...


Do you have dates for his tenure in Dallas? I'm guessing from sometime in the 1930s to the mid to late 1940s.
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