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Beyond The Adam Routine



 
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PH
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2002 12:47 pm    Post subject: Beyond The Adam Routine Reply with quote

I have worked with William Adam on and off for about 30 years. I have talked to many of his students and former students. I have to repeat that there is no “Adam Method” save being in the presence of Mr. Adam himself. There is also no single “Adam Routine”, although the benefits of doing the “routine” are legendary among his students. Adam has used several different versions of a daily routine in his teaching career. I know that in 30 years I have seen at least four different versions of “The Routine”. The basic routine was always supplemented and amplified with additional exercises, etudes, and literature drawn from a wide variety of sources.

Mr. Adam designs a unique approach to practice for each student and demonstrates this approach throughout the lesson by modeling tone, articulation, tempo, style, etc. In this way he would address each student’s particular developmental needs. It was this demonstration technique and Mr. Adam’s reliance on a call and response approach to playing in the lessons that most of us consider the single most important aspect of his teaching. He demonstrates an approach and the student answers and imitates. We also worked extensively on singing (with the voice) with the understanding that it is the ears that should control trumpet playing rather than the analytical mind. The secret to Adam’s success does not lie in the specific exercises. Rather, it is his approach to teaching, study, and practice that sets Adam’s teaching apart.

Most of the exercises and etudes Mr. Adam has used in his teaching are well known and familiar to most trumpet players and teachers. Only a few of the exercises he gave me over the years were not from published trumpet methods. Among these were his famous “Expanding Scales” and some “long line” studies (similar in some ways to other long setting studies), which he said he learned from Louis Maggio during his years as a player in Los Angeles. I want to note that most of the Maggio studies Mr. Adam used with me are quite different from Carlton MacBeth’s Maggio Method books.

Virtually every long time Adam student eventually worked through Arban, Schlossberg, and Clarke almost cover to cover. Other favorite books in Adam’s studio were:

The Ernest Williams Method (especially the sections on scales and intervals)
Robert Getchell-Practical Studies
Harry Glantz-Advanced Daily Studies (more recent versions of this book have been attributed to Charles Colin &/or Aaron Harris)
William Thiecke-The Art Of Trumpet Playing (again, more recently this book has been attributed to Charles Colin).

Favorite etudes included Goldman, Kopprasch, Wurm, Vannetelbosch, Charlier, and Bitsch. Contrary to some widely held misconceptions (about the relationship of exercises to the study of musical literature in his teaching), Adam also encourages his students to cover lots of solo literature, orchestral excerpts, and to memorize the melodies of great American songs by Kern, Berlin, Porter, Carmichael, Gershwin, etc.

In subsequent parts of this thread I intend to list and discuss some of Mr. Adam’s favorite studies from the Arban method.


<font size=-2>[ This Message was edited by: PH on 2002-05-16 15:50 ]</font>


Last edited by PH on Thu Nov 23, 2006 6:35 am; edited 1 time in total
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PH
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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2002 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr. Adam’s favorite Arban-

As I said in the previous post, most Adam students eventually would have worked on the vast majority of the Arban book. However, there are certain parts of Arban that seemed to be covered with greater frequency by more students.

It is important to note that no two Adam students would necessarily approach these studies in the same way. Most of us might have some of the same Arban double tongue studies assigned (for instance), but each of us would have that assignment presented with a customized model of tone, dynamics, volume, tempo, etc.

Most Adam students worked extensively on the following Arban exercises. Other sections of the book might be assigned for advanced applications or specific developmental needs.

Slur studies-p.39, #3-15 These would generally be played at an adlib tempo and the dynamics were usually modified so that in each slur there was a slight crescendo regardless of whether the slur ascends or descends. Accelerate the air through the sound and keep that sound foremost in your mind.

Cadenzas-p. 152 This is a page that most people skip in the Arban book. However, it is a favorite of most Adam students. Take your time. Keep the air flowing freely and let the sound sing!

Pronunciation-pp13-21 We use the word pronunciation instead of articulation because it is more descriptive of how we think as we sing through the trumpet and how the tongue actually works.

Sixteenth notes-the entire section starting on p.137, but especially p. 139 #35-38 & p.140 # 41-46.

We also work on the sections on major scales and triplets.

Multiple tonguing-Most everybody does the first several pages of triple-tongue studies (beginning on p. 155) and the first several pages of double-tongue studies (starting on p. 175). A favorite of many students was the “four corners” (not a Dean Smith thing), which was p. 162 # 26 & 32 and p. 163 # 33 & 36. In all of this we keep the air flowing and an emphasis on the tone. The pronunciation floats on the breath. It is my feeling that most people can’t practice these studies too slowly but it is very easy to get them going too fast!

Remember, there is nothing special or uniquely "Adam" about playing these exercises. There is no magic key to great trumpet playing. You need to put in the time. I remember being amazed when I arrived at IU as a graduate student and met Adam’s trumpet students. I had never been anywhere (including New York) where you would actually get grief for being a slacker if you “only” practiced 3 or 4 hours a day! I think the norm was something like 6 to 8 hours daily plus rehearsals and gigs. No wonder that at that time (early to mid-1980s) there were 10 or 12 guys in school who could play musically up to high A and beyond at the end of an 8-hour day and literally dozens of guys (almost everyone but the still scuffling new guys) who owned their F# all day.

It is how you think and the orientation toward sound that makes an Adam student an Adam student. You can apply this approach to virtually any playing once you understand it. However, the words on this screen or the notes on the page can’t possibly tell you how this works. You have to go to the source…Mr. Adam (or second best would be one of his better students).
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Barry
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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2002 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In addition to the above Arban's studies that Pat mentioned, Mr Adam also had us playing the 150 Classic and Popular Melodies (pg. 191-245) for lyrical playing, as well as the Concone studies. Occasionally, we would sight read the duets from Saint-Jacome, which are also lyrical.
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Atomlinson
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PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2002 1:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never heard of any Advanced Daily Studies by Harry Glantz mentioned in PH's post, only those by Aaron Harris.

Has anyone come across them?

Andrew Tomlinson

[ This Message was edited by: Atomlinson on 2002-05-31 04:14 ]
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PH
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2002 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My personal copy also says Harris & Colin as authors.

Mr. Adam's personal copy of this book (which I believe he acquired in the 1930s) lists Glantz as the author. The studies are identical to the Harris book, with the exception that the very last exercise (a fanfare-like tonguing study on the major triad) is omitted from my copy of the Harris book.

However, there is a difference in the organization of the two books. In Mr. Adam's Glantz book there 29 different studies on the diatonic major scale and related triad. All 29 studies are presented in the key of G. Then, all 29 studies are presented in the key of A, etc. for a total of 7 different keys (up through high F). The student is encouraged to transpose the studies to the remaining 5 keys by changing the key signature.

In my copy of the Harris version, the book still covers the same 28 exercises (minus the final fanfare) in the same 7 keys. However, in this tome each exercise is presented in all 7 keys before moving to the next study.

As to the book's authorship, who knows? I do know that Mr. Colin is known to be a master of copyright law and royalty manipulation. Nuff said.
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Atomlinson
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2002 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you PH for your detailed description of the differing versions of the "Advanced Daily Studies" by? .... take your pick!

I think my only comment at this stage would be that it is rather strange to change the authorship of a book of studies for trumpet players by a very famous trumpet player (Harry Glantz, Principal Trumpet New York Philharmonic and even more famously Principal Trumpet NBC Symphony Orchestra) to Aaron Harris (a Euphonium soloist with Sousa's Band and one of Charles Colin's teachers.) It doesn't make a lot of sense. How many trumpet players have ever heard of Aaron Harris?

I heard of Harry Glantz years ago but only read about Aaron Harris since joining the International Trumpet Guild a few years ago in an article on the life of Charles Colin in the Journal for February 1997 pages 10 & 11.

This is a very strange affair!

Maybe as PH has suggested it has to do with copyright law. Perhaps publishing them under the name Harry Glantz would have involved him in paying royalties to the Glantz estate, whereas by putting them out re-arranged under the name of Aaron Harris was the more profitable option. (A true ferengi mentality perhaps).

Andrew Tomlinson






[ This Message was edited by: Atomlinson on 2002-06-01 12:45 ]
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EBjazz
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2002 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are actually two books by Harris.
The book in question is Advanced Daily Studies (Harris Daily Routine).
The one that nobody ever mentions is call Advanced Studies by Aaron Harris. This book is 123 pp of etudes in EVERY major and minor key and they are not easy. He has four etudes in every key and they are fun to work out of and very thorough.
I'm working my way through this book for the second time.

Eb
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Atomlinson
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2002 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, the "Advanced Studies" is the Aaron Harris book I know. But that raises another interesting question.

If the "Advanced Daily Studies" is the Harris Daily Routine what are the "Routine Exercises" on pages 1 - 11 in the "Advanced Studies"? On page 1 top of the page the author says:

By playing the following routine exercises every day, a custom that the author has followed for many years, an enormous reserve of power and a complete mastery of your instrument will be attained, as is proven by numerous successful pupils, who have found these exercises very beneficial."

So now it looks as if we have two versions of the Harris Daily Routine.

The plot thickens!

Andrew Tomlinson
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razeontherock
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2005 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're right! I need to work p 163 # 36, and slowly.

Ray
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dbacon
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2005 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Daily Routine Exercises" by Aaron Harris takes about an hour to an hour and a half to practice through but it's an excellent daily routine. Always thought there was some similarity to the routine of Mr. Adam.
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eb1ch
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2006 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

this is a great thread. you should turn it into a sticky.
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EricM224
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The copy of the Glantz book that I have is called "Progressive Technique For Trumpet" aka Advanced Daily Studies but with each series of Exercises Laid out by KEY by: Charles Colin. I don't know if thats the book everyone is looking for, but Mr. Wing always refers to it as the Glantz Book. However he also has the Glantz book of 48 studies. If you look at the MSU studios version of "the Routine" you can see the excercises we use out of the "Progressive technique for Trumpet" book. The great thing about the book itself is that its very extensive, each key has Thirty studies. All in all I enjoy using this book, I think it really helps you get all over the horn!
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amtrumpet
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a question about the Concone studies mentioned earlier in this thread. I recently picked up an old book by Concone titled "Fifty lessons for the medium part of the voice (Transposed for soprano and tenor)." Are these the studies that are referred to? I played one in my lesson recently (before I found this edition) but didn't get a look at the book. My book has piano accompaniments, but the one I used in my lesson didn't. And if these are the right studies, should I transpose them for Bb trumpet or play them as written (or both)?
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Mike W
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only book that I can find on the Robert King website search is

The Art of Trumpet Playing with the authors being Broiles, M/Colin C.

Would this be the latest Thiecke ?

BTW, searching for stuff on the king website is no fun at all....
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PH
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike W wrote:
The only book that I can find on the Robert King website search is

The Art of Trumpet Playing with the authors being Broiles, M/Colin C.

Would this be the latest Thiecke ? ...


I'm pretty sure that is the right one.
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LStewart
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

amtrumpet wrote:
I had a question about the Concone studies mentioned earlier in this thread. I recently picked up an old book by Concone titled "Fifty lessons for the medium part of the voice (Transposed for soprano and tenor)." Are these the studies that are referred to? I played one in my lesson recently (before I found this edition) but didn't get a look at the book. My book has piano accompaniments, but the one I used in my lesson didn't. And if these are the right studies, should I transpose them for Bb trumpet or play them as written (or both)?


I believe the Concone book is "Lyrical Studies for Trumpet or Horn."
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Thieckgirl
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 6:47 pm    Post subject: The Art of Trumpet Playing book. Reply with quote

For those wondering, this is the Thieck method book which was originally published by Bechler.....The title was "Common Sense".....We have a copy of the original "Common Sense" that was written by my Grandfather Wm. Thieck.

Would love to find some old copies of the original version for his grandchildren each to have.

Lori Brosh
aka Thieckgirl
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