• FAQ  • Search  • Memberlist  • Usergroups   • Register   • Profile  • Log in to check your private messages  • Log in 

How did the notes come to you?


Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> High Range Development
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Rod Haney
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 22 Aug 2015
Posts: 569

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:20 pm    Post subject: How did the notes come to you? Reply with quote

I seem to be having good days and not as good days lately with my developing range. I always try to do 4 sets of 2 octave scales (once slurred and once tongued) and sometimes the hi F# seems easy and good and some days I only get it 2 of the 4 times I try. When I get it all 4 times that痴 a Good day. Also some days the notes get a little wobbly below low a, usually toward the end of my day. Some weeks I can go almost 6-7 days straight good and then have 3-4 not so good. I should also say I have only been able to do this as part of a good scale for about 1-2 months. I知 not getting pressure but I知 not getting my tongue level coordinated very well above hi C especially when I tongue. I really want to have articulation to my highest usable note but I知 missing something. Things are improving steadily and I知 playing more above the staff each day. Is this normal to have fits and starts when developing range. I知 going to start going to G as soon as I feel I get the tongue down. I can sound it but its not anything I壇 want to try to play, actually anything above hi e would be tough to guarantee. Was your process a little at a time or did something just go off? I hoping for just go off (lazy huh?).
Rod
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brad361
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 16 Dec 2007
Posts: 5526
Location: Houston, TX.

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 6:33 pm    Post subject: Re: How did the notes come to you? Reply with quote

Rod Haney wrote:
I seem to be having good days and not as good days lately with my developing range. I always try to do 4 sets of 2 octave scales (once slurred and once tongued) and sometimes the hi F# seems easy and good and some days I only get it 2 of the 4 times I try. When I get it all 4 times that痴 a Good day. Also some days the notes get a little wobbly below low a, usually toward the end of my day. Some weeks I can go almost 6-7 days straight good and then have 3-4 not so good. I should also say I have only been able to do this as part of a good scale for about 1-2 months. I知 not getting pressure but I知 not getting my tongue level coordinated very well above hi C especially when I tongue. I really want to have articulation to my highest usable note but I知 missing something. Things are improving steadily and I知 playing more above the staff each day. Is this normal to have fits and starts when developing range. I知 going to start going to G as soon as I feel I get the tongue down. I can sound it but its not anything I壇 want to try to play, actually anything above hi e would be tough to guarantee. Was your process a little at a time or did something just go off? I hoping for just go off (lazy huh?).
Rod


Check my Arturo quote at the bottom.

Brad
_________________
"I always try but, not always, because the horn is mercy-less, unpredictable and traitorous." - Arturo Sandoval
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Rod Haney
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 22 Aug 2015
Posts: 569

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:08 pm    Post subject: Re: How did the notes come to you? Reply with quote

Brad361 wrote:
Rod Haney wrote:
I seem to be having good days and not as good days lately with my developing range. I always try to do 4 sets of 2 .....a time or did something just go off? I hoping for just go off (lazy huh?).
Rod


Check my Arturo quote at the bottom.

Brad

When Arturo says it its probably true. His 創ut behind the steering wheel is much tighter than mine will ever be. I sometimes think its just trying to tease me into more practice I would be much more concerned if it was going backward, I guess these are just glimpses and I should be happy to get them enough to keep me at it. Working much more on regular trumpet stuff like attack, tongue, and reading. So much I need to learn to start playing at performance level that I have to spread it all too thin to suit me.
Rod
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Turkle
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 29 Apr 2008
Posts: 2036
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everything moves in fits and starts - no one learns skills in a linear development. There are long plateaus that seem like you'll never improve, and then you suddenly "level up" and gain a whole bunch at once.

I could do 1-2 pull-ups for about 2 years. Then all of a sudden I could do 10. There was never a time I could only do 5. From 1-2 straight to 10. I "leveled up."

Same for me with range. When I was re-learning to play after dental work, I had a high C and nothing above. Then one day I had an F over high C. It just happens like that sometimes.

Real improvement can happen when we least expect it.

My advice - which, please feel free to totally ignore - is that range improves in fits and starts, and if you feel like you've stalled out, you are most likely at a plateau. Keep working at it - and keep at your fundamentals, which is the really important thing - and when you do break through (no telling how long) you may find that you "level up" and make a big gain all at once.

(Also, I'll note that you're thinking about your tongue and all this stuff, and I personally find that utterly unhelpful. I got my range not by thinking about my tongue, but by listening to my sound. YMMV.)

Good luck!
_________________
Yamaha 8310Z trumpet
Yamaha 8310Z flugel
Curry 3.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Robert P
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 28 Feb 2013
Posts: 1348

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:02 am    Post subject: Re: How did the notes come to you? Reply with quote

Rod Haney wrote:
I seem to be having good days and not as good days lately with my developing range. I always try to do 4 sets of 2 octave scales (once slurred and once tongued) and sometimes the hi F# seems easy and good and some days I only get it 2 of the 4 times I try. When I get it all 4 times that痴 a Good day.

It's something you're doing differently. You need to zero in on what's happening with *everything* when the notes come out. The tension and focus of the muscles in the lips, the right pressure distribution of the mp against the teeth, the right jaw opening and horn angle, the right amount of upper and lower lip overlap of the teeth, the right airflow, the right oral cavity formation. Whatever you're doing when the notes pop out, if you do it every time, the notes will come out every time just as surely as a ball will hit the ground when you drop it.
_________________
Getzen Eterna Severinsen
King Silver Flair
Besson 1000
Bundy
No-name Chinese C
Vento flugel
Getzen Eterna pickle-oh
Schiller rotary pickle-oh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CJceltics33
Veteran Member


Joined: 24 Aug 2017
Posts: 248
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are improving, than there is definitely no need to worry. But I do have something to suggest. When working on high notes, ensure to play lots of high notes. But never too much. Be aware of your lips and required rest.

Also, I think soft scales would help your articulation problem. Try playing a Gb scale at pp up an octave. It is much easier to articulate at a lesser volume, so that might establish good habits for your tongue. Just a thought. Good luck!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
INTJ
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 25 Dec 2002
Posts: 1857
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Range development is rarely even. The key to is play high a lot but NOT strain to do so. That means being patient while we are practicing, which is especially hard when your extreme range falls off a couple notes on a given day.

I sometimes struggle with this. I usually play up to Double D and I become irritated on those ocassional days when I have difficulty with that note. My nature is to stick with it and force things to happen. That is exactly the wrong thing to do. The best advice for these situations is old advice, which is to make three it four attempts and then put the horn down and walk away for a while. Sticking with it and failing only trains us to fail.

During my daily warm up and range drills, I think hard about fundamentals. Air, tongue arch, chop setting. Many times after initially missing a note in my extreme upper range, which for me is anything above A over High C, I will get the note to speak and solidify by focusing on those fundamentals. If however I can稚 figure it out in 3-4 attempts, the ONLY correct action is to put the horn down and rest a bit.

Also, there is value in NOT getting hung up on a stopping point. For example, I might miss High B but nail Double C, C#, D, and even Eb and E. I値l take it anyway it wants to come.

As I type this I must admit I violated these principles my last practice session. I missed Double D but doubled down and tried too many times to get it, even though a couple times in these attempts I overshot to F or G above DHC. What I should have done was just run with it and let those overshooting notes speak and not worry about getting the D. The only way I値l ever progress from a High G/A player who ocassionally performs a Double C to being a true Double C player is by playing everyday to F/G above DHC AND playing DHC much more than the 15-20 times I do now in a practice session.
_________________
Wild Things
Wedge MPs

My posting rule: Keep to the high road...........
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pops
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 14 Sep 2002
Posts: 2019
Location: Dallas (Grand Prairie), Texas

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

By playing or trying to play hundreds of thousands of high notes.

When I got to where I could play 100 good high Cs or 200 bad ones I went to High D.
100 good High Ds or 200 whatever High Ds then I went to High E.

Fewer than 100 good High C,D,E...ones every day is too few.

Even if it is B or A below High C fewer than 100 a day is too few.

We gain control and power play playing LOTS of notes every day.

4 scales is playing the note 4 times. Tongue the note, slur to the note play a song that has that note 20 times like Fur Elise in the right key to make that note have 20 times.

Don't build a range flagpole. Build a range pyramid. Make a good solid base.
_________________
(My Posting Rule: No time for shouting matches.)
Clint 'Pops' McLaughlin
You can always Google me.
45 years Teaching. Teaching and writing books is all I do.
Video Courses, Ebooks, Skype Lessons: www.BbTrumpet.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
chuck in ny
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Sep 2006
Posts: 3467
Location: New York

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the difference here is that many of you guys are working professionals and had better develop a strong high range for business purposes in some reasonable time frame.
i tried clint's note pyramid and it was too much work for me.
where i am now is that following a healthy mouthpiece upsize i lost a lot of range. i decided to get it back by playing slowly graduated flexibilities and went with the bai lin book. it is a simple idea, you find yourself devastated, baby yourself and teach yourself to play through the register as if you were taking on a new student, square one.
it isn't very fast but it isn't very slow either. i got back my range. in playing this material day in and day out i noticed something else. along with a slow acquisition of the higher notes, everything below them blew with less effort and greater strength week after week. i had something that worked.
point understood that i couldn't earn a dime doing this. maybe another half year on this gentle approach and i would be ready to try the note pyramid again.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brad361
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 16 Dec 2007
Posts: 5526
Location: Houston, TX.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 4:10 pm    Post subject: Re: How did the notes come to you? Reply with quote

Rod Haney wrote:
Brad361 wrote:
Rod Haney wrote:
I seem to be having good days and not as good days lately with my developing range. I always try to do 4 sets of 2 .....a time or did something just go off? I hoping for just go off (lazy huh?).
Rod


Check my Arturo quote at the bottom.

Brad

When Arturo says it its probably true. His 創ut behind the steering wheel is much tighter than mine will ever be. I sometimes think its just trying to tease me into more practice I would be much more concerned if it was going backward, I guess these are just glimpses and I should be happy to get them enough to keep me at it. Working much more on regular trumpet stuff like attack, tongue, and reading. So much I need to learn to start playing at performance level that I have to spread it all too thin to suit me.
Rod


I agree that Arturo is on an entirely different level than most of us, but I do agree with his quote, and I think it can apply to us mere mortals. Doc has been quoted with a similar statement, again, he痴 on an entirely different level.
Consistency is something many of us struggle with. It sounds to me as if your general rate of progress is good, I would say stay the course. I don稚 believe many trumpet players ever reach a point where they don稚 have days when nothing seems to go smoothly.

Brad
_________________
"I always try but, not always, because the horn is mercy-less, unpredictable and traitorous." - Arturo Sandoval
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jordynbaxter
Regular Member


Joined: 08 Dec 2017
Posts: 28
Location: Glasgow UK

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a "come back player" but i only played for a couple of years in primary school and now 27. Basically all that separated me from a complete beginner was knowing that you have to buzz your lips to make a sound and (for some reason) remembering the fingering for the C major scale.

When i played before i distinctly remember not being able to play low A and struggling bad with high D, but i seem to be able to hit high F fairly consistently and can play all the way to low F# though the low notes are a bit bloofy sounding especially if im moving down to them from a higher register.

Not that it matters much, i'd rather be able to play some actual music in the middle register than be able to make the trumpet squeak!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
trumpet.trader
Veteran Member


Joined: 02 Jul 2017
Posts: 200

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jordynbaxter wrote:
I'm a "come back player" but i only played for a couple of years in primary school and now 27. Basically all that separated me from a complete beginner was knowing that you have to buzz your lips to make a sound and (for some reason) remembering the fingering for the C major scale.

When i played before i distinctly remember not being able to play low A and struggling bad with high D, but i seem to be able to hit high F fairly consistently and can play all the way to low F# though the low notes are a bit bloofy sounding especially if im moving down to them from a higher register.

Not that it matters much, i'd rather be able to play some actual music in the middle register than be able to make the trumpet squeak!


Being able to have command of the trumpet registers through a high F or hit F# is hardly 澱eing able to make the trumpet squeak

There is plenty of classical literature that regularly requires that range of the instrument, as well as if you want to be a well rounded trumpet player able to cover top 40 and commercial work, pit work and the lead chair in a big band.

So when referring to 殿ctual music for a utility trumpet player having a usable and playable range up to about a high G is pretty standard.

There痴 a difference between being able to 塗it a high F as you say, and actually commanding and playing a high F in a musical setting.

As for being a working trumpet player, having the ability to cover any book or chair, including lead books in a big band, solo trumpet in a musical orchestra pit, or cover a 4 hour wedding band job playing Top 40 stuff will put you at the top of the call list vs a player who would 途ather play some actual music in the middle register

Just some food for thought on the realities of what is required of a working trumpet player.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
INTJ
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 25 Dec 2002
Posts: 1857
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

chuck in ny wrote:
the difference here is that many of you guys are working professionals and had better develop a strong high range for business purposes in some reasonable time frame.
i tried clint's note pyramid and it was too much work for me.
where i am now is that following a healthy mouthpiece upsize i lost a lot of range. i decided to get it back by playing slowly graduated flexibilities and went with the bai lin book. it is a simple idea, you find yourself devastated, baby yourself and teach yourself to play through the register as if you were taking on a new student, square one.
it isn't very fast but it isn't very slow either. i got back my range. in playing this material day in and day out i noticed something else. along with a slow acquisition of the higher notes, everything below them blew with less effort and greater strength week after week. i had something that worked.
point understood that i couldn't earn a dime doing this. maybe another half year on this gentle approach and i would be ready to try the note pyramid again.


Chuck,

As you know I am just an amateur hack player. By following Pops guidance I have a pro player level range. I got there by practicing 1.5 to 2 hours per day and working up to 500-550 high notes per practice session. Now unlike a pro I am only good to that level for about two hours where a pro would be good for 4-8.

To your point, when I try to add another 50 notes at my extreme range all at once I trash my chops and have to take a break for a couple days. That is why Pops says go slowly. Maybe I add 5 more notes instead of 50. The main idea here is we have to play a lot in the upper range to have an upper range, but we can never strain as straining trains us the wrong way.

The end result is that we just have to take a lot of breaks and space our range development throughout our practice routine.
_________________
Wild Things
Wedge MPs

My posting rule: Keep to the high road...........
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
homecookin
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 07 Nov 2013
Posts: 868

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AsTurkle and others have stated in this thread, we all reach plateaus of improvement.
One thing I would like to suggest in addition to practicing scales would be the practicing of soft long tones throughout your ENTIRE RANGE.
I practiced scales, and lip slurs for years and years and I topped out at a high F #.
Hi G might as well have been another two octaves away.
Funny thing though, I could play a high A but I could not center in a high G.
When I began to practice soft long tones, starting with a good pianissimo attack and crescendoing for eight counts to a mezzo forte or a forte and then back down for eight counts to pianissimo, after several weeks of this dedicated practice my range and control begin to improve tremendously. Be sure to REST FREQUENTLY and not overdo this type of practice.
I now have a double C in the practice room, and a good solid high G on the gig when I need it.
In fact, my long tone practice is the first thing I do every morning.
The late Bill Chase was a big believer in Long Tones, as was the late Freddie Hubbard.
In fact, Freddie Hubbard told me in person many years ago that he could count the number of days that he missed doing his LONG TONE routine on the fingers of his right hand.


Last edited by homecookin on Sat Jan 13, 2018 6:07 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rod Haney
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 22 Aug 2015
Posts: 569

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

homecookin wrote:
AsTurkle and others have stated in this thread, we all reach plateaus of improvement.
One thing I would like to suggest in addition to practicing scales would be the practicing of soft long tones throughout your ENTIRE RANGE.
I practiced scales, and lip slurs for years and years and I topped out at a high F #.
Hi G might as well have been another two octaves away.
Funny thing though, I could play a high A but I could not center in a high G.
When I began to practice soft long tones, starting with a good pianissimo attack and crescendoing for eight counts to a mezzo forte or a forte and then back down for eight counts to pianissimo, after several weeks of this dedicated practice my range and control begin to improve tremendously. Be sure to REST FREQUENTLY and not overdo this type of practice.
I now have a double C in the practice room, and a good solid high G on the gig when I need it.
In fact, my long tone practice is the first thing I do every morning.
Bill Chase was a big believer in Long Tones, as was the late Freddie Hubbard.
In fact, Freddie Hubbard told me in person many years ago that he could count the number of days that he missed doing his LONG TONE routine on the fingers of his right hand.


Can you tell me how you approach these higher long tones? Playing ascending long tones above hi C may do wonders (honestly??) but when I start at A above staff and 1/2 step long tone to hi F I知 pretty well cooked, and there is not a lot of new territory going to be added on that day. Are you saying to add the long tones *say 16 counts at 60bpm - starting lower and go as high as you can ( 4 failure rule) until you can expand this?? New concept to me and wish to know how you approach it?
Thanks,
Rod
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jordynbaxter
Regular Member


Joined: 08 Dec 2017
Posts: 28
Location: Glasgow UK

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

trumpet.trader wrote:
Jordynbaxter wrote:
I'm a "come back player" but i only played for a couple of years in primary school and now 27. Basically all that separated me from a complete beginner was knowing that you have to buzz your lips to make a sound and (for some reason) remembering the fingering for the C major scale.

When i played before i distinctly remember not being able to play low A and struggling bad with high D, but i seem to be able to hit high F fairly consistently and can play all the way to low F# though the low notes are a bit bloofy sounding especially if im moving down to them from a higher register.

Not that it matters much, i'd rather be able to play some actual music in the middle register than be able to make the trumpet squeak!


Being able to have command of the trumpet registers through a high F or hit F# is hardly 澱eing able to make the trumpet squeak

There is plenty of classical literature that regularly requires that range of the instrument, as well as if you want to be a well rounded trumpet player able to cover top 40 and commercial work, pit work and the lead chair in a big band.

So when referring to 殿ctual music for a utility trumpet player having a usable and playable range up to about a high G is pretty standard.

There痴 a difference between being able to 塗it a high F as you say, and actually commanding and playing a high F in a musical setting.

As for being a working trumpet player, having the ability to cover any book or chair, including lead books in a big band, solo trumpet in a musical orchestra pit, or cover a 4 hour wedding band job playing Top 40 stuff will put you at the top of the call list vs a player who would 途ather play some actual music in the middle register

Just some food for thought on the realities of what is required of a working trumpet player.


You misread my post, i meant that i am not pushing to extend my range up to the really high notes which you might class as squeaks. And when i say actual music i just mean a nice consistent musical tone. I know there is a difference hence why i said not that my range matters much at this point because nothing i play sounds particularly musical at the moment.

I just find it odd than i am able to play these notes at all after a few weeks, when i couldnt reach them at all when i was a kid.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
homecookin
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 07 Nov 2013
Posts: 868

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rod Haney wrote:
homecookin wrote:
AsTurkle and others have stated in this thread, we all reach plateaus of improvement.
One thing I would like to suggest in addition to practicing scales would be the practicing of soft long tones throughout your ENTIRE RANGE.
I practiced scales, and lip slurs for years and years and I topped out at a high F #.
Hi G might as well have been another two octaves away.
Funny thing though, I could play a high A but I could not center in a high G.
When I began to practice soft long tones, starting with a good pianissimo attack and crescendoing for eight counts to a mezzo forte or a forte and then back down for eight counts to pianissimo, after several weeks of this dedicated practice my range and control begin to improve tremendously. Be sure to REST FREQUENTLY and not overdo this type of practice.
I now have a double C in the practice room, and a good solid high G on the gig when I need it.
In fact, my long tone practice is the first thing I do every morning.
The late Bill Chase was a big believer in Long Tones, as was the late Freddie Hubbard.
In fact, Freddie Hubbard told me in person many years ago that he could count the number of days that he missed doing his LONG TONE routine on the fingers of his right hand.


Can you tell me how you approach these higher long tones? Playing ascending long tones above hi C may do wonders (honestly??) but when I start at A above staff and 1/2 step long tone to hi F I知 pretty well cooked, and there is not a lot of new territory going to be added on that day. Are you saying to add the long tones *say 16 counts at 60bpm - starting lower and go as high as you can ( 4 failure rule) until you can expand this?? New concept to me and wish to know how you approach it?
Thanks,
Rod


Rod,

Basically... what you do is you start with low C start pp with a good attack, crescendo for eight counts(at 60 bpm) to a good mf and then decrescendo for eight counts down to ppp.
Resting between each tone, continue this up to third space C.
Then it is suggested that you rest for a few minutes, and then continue the process starting on 3rd space C up to high C, remembering to rest between each tone.
Then you rest for a few minutes again.
Then you continue by starting on low C working your way down to low F #
and then back up to low C.
Always strive for a good clean attack and a good steady crescendo and decrescendo.
It is suggested that you do this for a few weeks and not worry too much about going above high C.
This routine usually takes me about an hour to do with the proper rests.
After you gain some proficiency at this exercise you will begin to feel your embouchure strengthening and your tone will certainly be improving, and you will be gaining control.
Remember... Do not practice too loudly ! Practice mostly very softly !!
When you can do this routine a couple of times a day, say once in the morning, and once in the afternoon, and when you feel confident, then you can begin to work above high C in the same manner. It does not come overnight.
It is important to remember ...DO NOT OVERDO IT...REST FREQUENTLY!!!
This basic routine is the first exercise in a book(not really a book, more like a brochure)
entitled...
DAILY EMBOUCHURE STUDIES
By Edwin Franko Goldman.
Which was originally published by Carl Fischer.
It was first published in 1909 and then it was published again in 1934.
The brochure also contains lip slurs, major scales, arpeggios, and tonguing exercises.
I think you can probably still order a copy of this publication from Pender's Music in Denton Texas.
Hope this info is helpful.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Brad361
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 16 Dec 2007
Posts: 5526
Location: Houston, TX.

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jordynbaxter wrote:
I'm a "come back player" but i only played for a couple of years in primary school and now 27. Basically all that separated me from a complete beginner was knowing that you have to buzz your lips to make a sound and (for some reason) remembering the fingering for the C major scale.

When i played before i distinctly remember not being able to play low A and struggling bad with high D, but i seem to be able to hit high F fairly consistently and can play all the way to low F# though the low notes are a bit bloofy sounding especially if im moving down to them from a higher register.

Not that it matters much, i'd rather be able to play some actual music in the middle register than be able to make the trumpet squeak!


If I understand your meaning when you use the word 塗igh, the range you池e describing actually will drastically limit your ability to play 途eal music; even middle school second trumpet parts require more range than that. If you池e a comeback player, coming back from basically being a beginner, welcome back, keep practicing and take some lessons. But the reality is, you will eventually need a range from F# below the staff to at least C above the staff to play 途eal music.

Keep at it, best of luck, have fun!

Brad
_________________
"I always try but, not always, because the horn is mercy-less, unpredictable and traitorous." - Arturo Sandoval
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
razeontherock
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 05 Jun 2004
Posts: 10512
Location: The land of GR and Getzen

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rod, a good approach that might serve you well now is the every other day idea. Work to the top of your range one day, the next day don't; instead maybe try a long tone drill or CG's "moving long tone" idea, well into your upper register but not the last couple whole steps. This adds to Pop's range pyramid idea, building that base.

If this works for you it's because the muscle memory lasts for the day without tapping out your range, and the exertion is enough to require more recovery time. A Reinhardt rule I wish I learned as a young buck is always build up, never tear down. I can play lots of high notes on torn down chops and even sound good doing it, but it only makes me 'better' at doing it wrong. Not exactly the recipe for consistent progress.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jordynbaxter
Regular Member


Joined: 08 Dec 2017
Posts: 28
Location: Glasgow UK

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brad361 wrote:
Jordynbaxter wrote:
I'm a "come back player" but i only played for a couple of years in primary school and now 27. Basically all that separated me from a complete beginner was knowing that you have to buzz your lips to make a sound and (for some reason) remembering the fingering for the C major scale.

When i played before i distinctly remember not being able to play low A and struggling bad with high D, but i seem to be able to hit high F fairly consistently and can play all the way to low F# though the low notes are a bit bloofy sounding especially if im moving down to them from a higher register.

Not that it matters much, i'd rather be able to play some actual music in the middle register than be able to make the trumpet squeak!


If I understand your meaning when you use the word 塗igh, the range you池e describing actually will drastically limit your ability to play 途eal music; even middle school second trumpet parts require more range than that. If you池e a comeback player, coming back from basically being a beginner, welcome back, keep practicing and take some lessons. But the reality is, you will eventually need a range from F# below the staff to at least C above the staff to play 途eal music.

Keep at it, best of luck, have fun!

Brad


I don't think i should have said "actual music" ha! What i mean is my focus right now is on getting the notes in range that i do have sounding consistently "musical" rather than specifically trying to extend it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> High Range Development All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group