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Acid bleed, Super Olds



 
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Tivolian
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Joined: 22 May 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Upstate New York

PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:13 am    Post subject: Acid bleed, Super Olds Reply with quote

Greetings. I have several spots of acid bleed around the tone ring on the bell of my Olds Super. I've read a thread or two on TH about similar issues and seen that folks recommend stripping and re-lacquering. Most of the lacquer on my horn is great, and I'd rather live with the acid bleed than re-lacquer the whole thing, but I wonder if there are ways of spot-fixing the problem. Apologies if this trivial/uninteresting for some.... and thanks.
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(stopped playing in 1972 after high school, started up again in 2016. Loving it.
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shofarguy
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Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 6202
Location: AZ

PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Acid bleed, Super Olds Reply with quote

Tivolian wrote:
Greetings. I have several spots of acid bleed around the tone ring on the bell of my Olds Super. I've read a thread or two on TH about similar issues and seen that folks recommend stripping and re-lacquering. Most of the lacquer on my horn is great, and I'd rather live with the acid bleed than re-lacquer the whole thing, but I wonder if there are ways of spot-fixing the problem. Apologies if this trivial/uninteresting for some.... and thanks.


There really isn't a simple process to reverse the staining of what is commonly called Acid Bleed. What happens, (according to Adam Getzen, if I understand him) is that, at the end of soldering, the horn is dipped into a caustic (not acidic) bath to remove excess solder and prepare it for buffing, polishing and lacquering, However, sometimes there are voids that develop under the bell bead and retain this caustic fluid. After lacquering, the fluid leaks out and etches the metal, discoloring it. To repair the metal and remove the stain, the horn has to be stripped, the stain buffed out and polished, then the whole horn re-lacquered.

It seems to be the attitude of the brass makers I know that there is much more potential to change the horn (whether for good or ill) by trying to repair the staining, than by learning to live with the discoloration.
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yourbrass
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Joined: 12 Jun 2011
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Location: Pacifica, CA, USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've spot-buffed and then lacquered this kind of discoloration. There will be a color difference, and it will be larger than the original area of discoloration than the original problem. Sometimes worth it, sometimes not.
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