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Caruso for Bassoon



 
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JOF
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Joined: 05 Aug 2018
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Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2019 8:02 am    Post subject: Caruso for Bassoon Reply with quote

One can read Granger’s Introduction to Carmine Caruso’s Embouchure Calisthenics for the Bassoon and see page 1 of the “Calisthenics’ from his book on the Passamezzo Moderno website.

When I first read his Introduction, I was skeptical to look further:

I was unaware of his background, and, in fact, never asked him about it. I relied totally on the recommendations of my friends. Through them I learned that he played all the wind and brass instruments. It wasn’t until years later that I learned that his primary instrument was trumpet. In a way, my ignorance was a plus. It allowed me to simply accept his lessons without question. Perhaps if I had known his first instrument was a brass, I would have doubted his method. Fortunately, I accepted his lessons in full faith.

Being retired, I now play in a couple of amateur Harmonie (concert band format) and Fanfare (brass, percussion and saxophones) Orchestras. The overriding technical shortcomings in these groups stems from inadequate breath control – the heart of Carmine’s teaching. This year the conductor has been willing to introduce 6 Notes (alternating weeks now with 6 Notes (SLS) and an Interval Study at the beginning of each rehearsal. I have always felt a slight sense of the woodwind players thinking that this was really for brass players so I have been searching for any Caruso materials written for woodwinds. (I should add that I have gotten much helpful advice about using Caruso materials with young band students from Allan Dean and Kevin Everitt on this forum!) However Granger’s book for bassoon is the first (and also quite substantial) book I have found which
Is written for a woodwind instrument. It covers a program of study for 54 weeks – a week being the same concept as Caruso’s Calisthenics for Brass and therefore make take more than 54 weeks to work through. At week 22, Granger begins to include the Baermann Clarinet Book materials and materials built on successive 5ths and successive 4ths as found in Flexus (Frink/McNeil). At week 41, he begins adding Intervals (first Regular, then SLS and finally LSL) beginning on 9ths up through 15ths) so that by Week 50 one plays 6 Interval Studies per day. Granger uses a lot of articulation studies in his overall approach to applying Caruso Studies to the bassoon. Since all of these are based upon varying forms of interval studies and Developed Scale and Interval studies, I assume these are from Carmine. There are no “Clarke’ type of studies but these will accomplish the same training include double/triple tonguing that the Clarke: Technical Studies which are used by brass players in Carmine’s pedagogy.

For players interested in Caruso’s pedagogy, it is a book I recommend.

Passamezzo Moderno (http://www.passamezzomoderno.com/publications.php)
Carmine Caruso’s Embouchure Calisthenics for the Bassoon ($25)
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peanuts56
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Joined: 02 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 3:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I studied with Carmine in the mid 70's. I posted a while back about a husband and wife who followed my lesson. The wife was a violinist. I can't recall what the husband played. The woman sat down first for her session. I wanted to stay and watch her lesson but I had to get back to Grand Central to catch a train.
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PH
Bill Adam/Carmine Caruso Forum Moderator


Joined: 26 Nov 2001
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Location: Bloomington Indiana

PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

During my time with Carmine, I observed violin, sax, oboe, vocalists, as well as brass players. The fundamentals of the approach work across platform and the exercises were similar with adaptations.
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Professor of Jazz Studies, Indiana University Jacobs School of Music
Faculty Jamey Aebersold Jazz Workshops since 1976
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peanuts56
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Joined: 02 Jan 2011
Posts: 376

PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PH wrote:
During my time with Carmine, I observed violin, sax, oboe, vocalists, as well as brass players. The fundamentals of the approach work across platform and the exercises were similar with adaptations.


Most definitely! I don't really play trumpet any more for a variety of reasons. Five years ago I decided to study finger style ukulele after hearing Jake Shimabukuro play live. Not having any real background in strings other than Guitar and Violin while getting my Music Ed. degree I found it way harder than I anticipated. Learning the various picking patterns became much easier when I applied the foot tap and subdividing the last beat before starting an exercise. These are the core of Carmines philosophy. This principle works on any instrument in my opinion.
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