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Terence Wilkerson
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Joined: 28 Apr 2020
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2020 10:45 pm    Post subject: Newbie here Reply with quote

Wagner Spraytech 0518080 HVLP & Graco 17G177 ProX17 Paint Sprayer Reviews

Painting is one of the most convenient and economical ways to redecorate your home walls, fences, decks, cabinets, furniture, and many other items. You can make your rooms and kitchen look new and alive by changing the color. However, it might be a time-consuming and tiring task if you try to use brushes or rollers. On the other hand, the best paint sprayer will make it a lot easier by enabling you to cover huge spaces in a matter of minutes.

If you are going to hire a painter, then read this article first. We will tell you how you can do it yourself instead of paying a lot of money to any professional. With the best paint sprayer for walls, you will be achieving professional-looking and smooth finish outcomes in a breeze.

✪✪✪ You Might Also Enjoy: Best Paint Sprayer Reviews

Top Recommended Model: Wagner Spraytech 0518080 HVLP Paint Sprayer



Why Is It Our Top Recommended Model?

The Wagner Spraytech 0518080 is the best HVLP paint sprayer for home use because it features an adjustable flow control. Hence, buyers can achieve the most precise painting results when using stains, sealers, urethanes, latex, or resins. Furthermore, it offers three spray patterns like circular, horizontal, or vertical. These patterns and adjustments of the paint flow enable users to get the best finish on various surfaces. It is the best paint spray gun for walls, fences, decks, furniture, or other desired surfaces.

How Is It An Ideal Choice For Homeowners?

DIY homeowners and weekend warriors will find it the best HVLP spray gun for completing their various painting tasks conveniently and effectively. It comes with a twenty-foot paint hose, so they would not have to move it around the area frequently during their work. Moreover, they will also get it with two paint containers. A small cup is perfect for small painting tasks, and the other one will enable them to handle large painting projects with ease. Both are durable and easy to wash because of plastic material.

The powerful two-stage turbine makes it easy to use any paint, including thin or thick ones. Therefore, homeowners can spray varnish, stain, or latex according to their requirements.

Comprehensive Review of All Benefits:

Below is a comprehensive review of its all benefits, which will help you make a confident decision.

HVLP Technology:

The Wagner Spraytech 0518080 uses HVLP technology for ensuring a smooth finish on all surfaces like doors, decks, trims, fences, furniture, etc. With this technology, it atomizes material into fine particles so the users can achieve the best possible and professional-looking outcomes.

High-Quality Nozzle:

This paint sprayer features a versatile nozzle suitable for a wide range of materials and projects. High-quality manufacturing material makes this nozzle long-lasting and durable as compared to cheap alternatives. Therefore, you will find the best Wagner paint sprayer among all other models.

Powerful Two-Stage Turbine:

Due to its powerful two-stage turbine, you will find it compatible with a wide variety of paints. You can rely on this model for painting walls and other desired surfaces with all kinds of materials, including stains, latex, and many more.

Convenient Settings Adjustment:

This model allows customizing paint flow by turning the pressure control dial. With appropriate material flow adjustment, you will be receiving the perfect finish coatings every time. Moreover, you can choose the desired spray pattern from its air cap in a breeze.

Perfect Design:

The Wagner Spraytech 0518080 paint sprayer has a perfect design to meet the various requirements of homeowners. For instance, it includes a 20-foot hose to reach all areas without moving the machine. The handle incorporates an ergonomic design to ensure no fatigue in your hands when using it on large or time-consuming projects. It also comes with 1-1/2 qt and 1-qt paint containers, so you can choose the one that meets your painting needs. Order this paint sprayer for thick paint to enhance your painting performance in real-time.

✪✪✪ Selected For You: Reviews of Best Rated Paint Sprayer For Furniture - Top Paint Sprayers

Best for Thick Materials: Graco 17G177 ProX17 Paint Sprayer



Why Did We Choose It?

The Graco 17G177 ProX17 is the best airless paint sprayer for home use. If you want to tackle large projects effectively and efficiently, this would be the perfect choice for spraying thick or thin materials. It is among the expensive models available on the market today, but its unique combination of convenience and versatility justifies that price tag. Due to its perfect functionality, you can buy it for painting large surfaces around the home and workplace.

Brief Review of All Benefits:

Below is a brief review of all benefits that you can achieve after ordering this paint sprayer.

Adjustable pressure enables users to control paint flow according to their projects.

It includes a ProX pump made with stainless steel that sprays thick materials at high pressure.

A flexible suction tube allows users to paint directly from a bucket.

Users can spray up to 300 gallons per year.

PowerFlush Adapter makes cleaning of the unit easy.

Due to 150 feet hose support, it provides extra reach for large projects.

RAC IV Switch Tip is available that ensures continuous spraying.

How Will It Make Your Projects Easy?

With its fully adjustable pressure, the Graco 17G177 ProX17 will enable you to control the paint flow. Hence, you will be accomplishing your projects with finish coatings efficiently. It also includes a powerful Pro X stainless steel piston pump, which will allow you to spray thick materials without thinning. Moreover, you may spray directly from one to five gallons buckets on this model. Hence, you will not have to waste time thinning the thick paint materials or pouring them into any container before starting your project.

After purchasing the best Graco paint sprayer, you will not require any other tool for up to many years because of its durable and consistent performance. It can spray 300 gallons of paint per year, making it an ideal choice for people who want to paint a lot. This easy operating model includes Graco’s PowerFlush Adapter System, so you can connect it to a water hose for cleaning efficiently and conveniently after completing work.

It also supports a hose of up to 150 feet, which will enable you to access all areas of large projects without any trouble. The reversible tip is available to keep your painting process continuing if any clog occurs. These features make it the best paint sprayer for cabinets, walls, furniture, doors, and many more.

✓✓✓ Useful Link: Read here for more information

After reading these detailed reviews, you are at the stage to make the right decision regarding the best paint sprayer for your home.


Last edited by Terence Wilkerson on Sun Apr 04, 2021 9:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PH
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:48 am    Post subject: Re: Newbie here Reply with quote

Terence Wilkerson wrote:
Hi,
I am a beginner, both in trumpet and Jazz. I have just started with Coker's "Patterns for Jazz" and I have noticed that it greatly helps me to visualize a keyboard (my first instrument) to pick up the right notes to construct the chords and then translate them to the trumpet fingering. Is this a bad habit that will made more harm that good in the long term so I should avoid it?


I think that, as long as you focus on hearing the sound of the notes in your imagination, the keyboard visualisation is fine. My mentor and friend, Jamey Aebersold, says that when he is playing sax he is seeing the keyboard in his mind. And if you've heard him, he's pretty good.
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khedger
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Newbie here Reply with quote

Terence Wilkerson wrote:
Hi,
I am a beginner, both in trumpet and Jazz. I have just started with Coker's "Patterns for Jazz" and I have noticed that it greatly helps me to visualize a keyboard (my first instrument) to pick up the right notes to construct the chords and then translate them to the trumpet fingering. Is this a bad habit that will made more harm that good in the long term so I should avoid it?


I once read an interview where Diz was asked why he told young musicians to learn the piano. He said it was because with the keyboard you could 'see everything', meaning you could actually see how chords could be voiced, how notes related to one another, etc. It sounds to me like you're doing the same kind of thing right in the old noggin'. Can't be a bad thing......

keith
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jhatpro
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2020 2:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are my ten top tips for a trumpet player primarily interested in playing jazz. People into other genres may disagree with some of them but I believe they’ve helped me. Hope they help you.

I. Listen to as much jazz as you can.
2. Warm up every session softly, slowly with your favorite jazz ballad. Play from memory as soon as you can. Switch to a different one frequently.
3. Don’t obsess on range, speed or volume. Do your playing in short sessions throughout the day.
4. Remember that trumpet playing requires relaxed, deep breathing.
5. Downsize your mouthpiece until you find the smallest that will still give you good sound. Keep your aperture as small as possible.
6. Use a tuner, metronome and recorder. Your smart phone is OK; the zoom recorders are better.
7. Play along with Aebersolds, Real Book and real recordings. Play with live groups when you can.
8. Work on scales and chords in conjunction with the tunes you are learning.
Focus on jazz standards that are most likely to be called in a jam session.
9. Master the II V I progression. Having a keyboard nearby will help.
10. Get a good, jazz-oriented teacher who can keep your journey on course.
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“The notes are there. Find them.” Mingus
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TrumpetMD
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2020 2:19 am    Post subject: Re: Newbie here Reply with quote

Terence Wilkerson wrote:
Hi,
I am a beginner, both in trumpet and Jazz. I have just started with Coker's "Patterns for Jazz" and I have noticed that it greatly helps me to visualize a keyboard (my first instrument) to pick up the right notes to construct the chords and then translate them to the trumpet fingering. Is this a bad habit that will made more harm that good in the long term so I should avoid it?

Welcome to TH! I also play jazz trumpet and piano.

Jerry Coker's book is the standard. It may be too advanced from someone just starting out. But with your piano background, it sounds like the book is working out for you. That's great.

Lots of good comments already given.

I depends on what I'm playing. I sometimes visualize patterns of notes on a keyboard when playing them on the trumpet. And I sometimes do the opposite, by visualizing the notes on a trumpet when soloing on the piano. I don't think this will hurt you.

Mike
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Bach Stradivarius 43* Trumpet (1974), Bach 6C Mouthpiece.
Olds L-12 Flugelhorn (1969), Yamaha 13F4 Mouthpiece.
Plus a few other Bach, Getzen, Olds, Carol, HN White, and Besson horns.
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khedger
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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jhatpro wrote:
Here are my ten top tips for a trumpet player primarily interested in playing jazz. People into other genres may disagree with some of them but I believe they’ve helped me. Hope they help you.

I. Listen to as much jazz as you can.
2. Warm up every session softly, slowly with your favorite jazz ballad. Play from memory as soon as you can. Switch to a different one frequently.
3. Don’t obsess on range, speed or volume. Do your playing in short sessions throughout the day.
4. Remember that trumpet playing requires relaxed, deep breathing.
5. Downsize your mouthpiece until you find the smallest that will still give you good sound. Keep your aperture as small as possible.
6. Use a tuner, metronome and recorder. Your smart phone is OK; the zoom recorders are better.
7. Play along with Aebersolds, Real Book and real recordings. Play with live groups when you can.
8. Work on scales and chords in conjunction with the tunes you are learning.
Focus on jazz standards that are most likely to be called in a jam session.
9. Master the II V I progression. Having a keyboard nearby will help.
10. Get a good, jazz-oriented teacher who can keep your journey on course.


Care to elaborate on number 5 for all of us 3c players?

keith
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jhatpro
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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I played 3C for a long time and still do for a classical sound but good things happened to my jazz playing when I went to an Austin Custom Brass TA1 which is V-shaped and between a 5 and a 7 in rim ID.
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“The notes are there. Find them.” Mingus
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HERMOKIWI
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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

khedger wrote:
jhatpro wrote:
Here are my ten top tips for a trumpet player primarily interested in playing jazz. People into other genres may disagree with some of them but I believe they’ve helped me. Hope they help you.

I. Listen to as much jazz as you can.
2. Warm up every session softly, slowly with your favorite jazz ballad. Play from memory as soon as you can. Switch to a different one frequently.
3. Don’t obsess on range, speed or volume. Do your playing in short sessions throughout the day.
4. Remember that trumpet playing requires relaxed, deep breathing.
5. Downsize your mouthpiece until you find the smallest that will still give you good sound. Keep your aperture as small as possible.
6. Use a tuner, metronome and recorder. Your smart phone is OK; the zoom recorders are better.
7. Play along with Aebersolds, Real Book and real recordings. Play with live groups when you can.
8. Work on scales and chords in conjunction with the tunes you are learning.
Focus on jazz standards that are most likely to be called in a jam session.
9. Master the II V I progression. Having a keyboard nearby will help.
10. Get a good, jazz-oriented teacher who can keep your journey on course.


Care to elaborate on number 5 for all of us 3c players?

keith


I also noticed/questioned that one. Is "good sound" the same as "best sound?" Does the smallest possible aperture size automatically yield the best results for jazz?

I'm fine with the other 9 points on the list.
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jhatpro
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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2020 2:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All I can say is downsizing helped me with range, response, and endurance. It also makes my sound brighter which may not fit everyone’s concept of best sound, but it gives me what I want for big band.
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Jim Hatfield

“The notes are there. Find them.” Mingus
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