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Smaller or bigger mouthpiece?


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delano
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009
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Location: The Netherlands

PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2021 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a (big) difference between to be able to play on a certain mouthpiece and be fully accustomed to it. Nobody says or said that you can only play one mouthpiece, I myself play different mouthpieces (like I said in my previous post) for trumpet, rotary trumpet, cornet and flügel (and trombone). But all of them get playing time to stay in shape for them.
Don't be too sure that 'all of us' tested dozens of mouthpieces, you will be disappointed. I know several pros who use the same mouthpiece for years and sometimes decades. Only you will not find these players here in de mouthpiece forum. And lots of players make sure that the different mouthpieces they have to use for different instruments will have the same rim. Where should that be for? And maybe it's fun to read all the posts here from members who found 'The One' which holy grails you could find some weeks or months later (very) cheap here in the marketplace. All pieces that felt 'awesome' when tried out in the shop. You call it honeymoon, I call it wrong method. What does that mean? That it's better to change mouthpieces if you know why and have some clue about which direction you want to go. And then give it a serious chance.

N.B. One of the mistakes often made with at random testing of mouthpieces in a shop is that they come home with a too big mouthpiece. Felt very good, played easy and a big sound. Unfortunately that all will not last.


Last edited by delano on Thu May 20, 2021 9:04 am; edited 1 time in total
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cheiden
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PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2021 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my experience, first impressions while not dismissable, are ultimately not reliable. A favorable initial impression could be that the piece feels or plays familiar. But familiar is of limited value when you're trying to make a change. The other favorable impression could be due that it feels comfortable. But a comfortable rim might lack grip needed to preserve endurance.

Sure there are pieces that I try that I'm pretty sure have no chance. But there are plenty of others that really take time to know if they have merit.
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B. Scriver
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Joined: 14 Jan 2002
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PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2021 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So the shoe size comparison thing does not fly with some of you. OK cool. Ya , you can measure feet and not lips. It was a very basic and simple analogy.

However, we use the GR Playing Tests to fit players properly and those tests never lie.

You can play a big and a small mouthpiece? Let's do the testing and see if they really both work for you. If they both work for you and you can play accurately without having to manipulate, then great!

We can do a Zoom meeting and record it for everyone here so we can all get a taste of what we are trying to accomplish. It would be a great learning experience and everyone can chime in with criticism and suggestions. Hit me up if you want to participate.

Brian Scriver
www.grmouthpieces.com
grmouthpieces@gmail.com
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yinzbrass
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Joined: 14 May 2021
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA

PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2021 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aidan:
It may seem obvious, but you are considering changing two variables. Make sure you only change one at a time. It would be a shame to buy a $3000 trumpet because the sound or feel you liked came from its $75 mouthpiece.

A Bach 7C is a good mouthpiece for many beginners, and some pros. One of my teachers taught at a large university and played a 7C with a wide rim on everything from symphony work to lead jazz to piccolo trumpet. He had a huge, beautiful sound and an easy time getting around the horn. I, on the other hand need a number of different pieces to get the most out of my playing.

Before dropping big money on a mouthpiece and/or horn, I'd strongly recommend finding a good trumpet teacher in your area, taking a lesson or two, and then getting the teacher's advice on horn and mouthpiece. Good luck on your search.
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Jaw04
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Joined: 31 Dec 2015
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PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2021 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have experimented in either direction. I've used small, tight, shallow mouthpieces for a period of time as well as wide, deep, and open, and everything in between. Currently I prefer a large mouthpiece.

I think mouthpiece choice is more about sound and style you are going for than it is about the shape or size of your lips and teeth. I think anybody can learn to play almost any mouthpiece if they want to and really put the time in. I think it is not like shoe size like everybody says. To me it is more like shoe style. Do you want to wear boots, running shoes, flip flops, high heels or skate shoes? Depends on your style and what you are going for.
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delano
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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2021 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only an illustration, from an interview with the English player Neil Yates:

Yates has occasionally “dabbled” with other mouthpieces, but says that it’s a real trap for horn players. “You try a new mouthpiece and for three weeks you can do incredible things on it that you could never do before. Then after three weeks, you can’t do anything. I once did it – I don’t remember what make of mouthpiece it was, but I got all the high notes and everything, and thought, wow, this is it. Then I went back to my old mouthpiece and it took me three to four months to get back to where I was – I’ve never done it again.”

https://www.jazzwise.com/other/article/neil-yates-trumpet-and-flugelhorn
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HaveTrumpetWillTravel
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Joined: 30 Jan 2018
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Location: East Asia

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2021 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jaw04 wrote:
I have experimented in either direction. I've used small, tight, shallow mouthpieces for a period of time as well as wide, deep, and open, and everything in between. Currently I prefer a large mouthpiece.

I think mouthpiece choice is more about sound and style you are going for than it is about the shape or size of your lips and teeth. I think anybody can learn to play almost any mouthpiece if they want to and really put the time in. I think it is not like shoe size like everybody says. To me it is more like shoe style. Do you want to wear boots, running shoes, flip flops, high heels or skate shoes? Depends on your style and what you are going for.


+1

I can play most mouthpieces and often the trade-offs are apparent: bigger sound, more endurance, slightly easier high range, better low range, intonation, etc. I think a good middle-of-the-road mouthpiece is a wise place to stay for now.
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hibidogrulez
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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2021 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HaveTrumpetWillTravel wrote:
Jaw04 wrote:
I have experimented in either direction. I've used small, tight, shallow mouthpieces for a period of time as well as wide, deep, and open, and everything in between. Currently I prefer a large mouthpiece.

I think mouthpiece choice is more about sound and style you are going for than it is about the shape or size of your lips and teeth. I think anybody can learn to play almost any mouthpiece if they want to and really put the time in. I think it is not like shoe size like everybody says. To me it is more like shoe style. Do you want to wear boots, running shoes, flip flops, high heels or skate shoes? Depends on your style and what you are going for.


+1

I can play most mouthpieces and often the trade-offs are apparent: bigger sound, more endurance, slightly easier high range, better low range, intonation, etc. I think a good middle-of-the-road mouthpiece is a wise place to stay for now.

+2 That’s my reason for having multiple mouthpieces as well. It took me a week or 2 to learn how to play shallow mouthpieces when I first tried one, and the same was true for the deep-V flugel cup I got a few months back.

The first impressions I’ve had with mouthpieces usually held up though. The main reason I stopped playing my old mouthpieces wasn’t because I didn’t like them, but rather because either I’d switched trumpet and they no longer matched, or (recently) because the ones I got to replace them were just objectively better for me.
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Yamahaguy
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Joined: 09 Dec 2004
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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2021 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

B. Scriver wrote:
You can play a big and a small mouthpiece? Let's do the testing and see if they really both work for you. If they both work for you and you can play accurately without having to manipulate, then great!

We can do a Zoom meeting and record it for everyone here so we can all get a taste of what we are trying to accomplish. It would be a great learning experience and everyone can chime in with criticism and suggestions. Hit me up if you want to participate.
I would LOVE to be a part of this! Please PM me any details...

I personally cannot play on different diameters, all of my pieces have identical rims.
Variations in cup depth/shape and backbore change depending on the gig.

Peace,
Dennis
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chase1973
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Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2021 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before you go spending hundreds of dollars on equipment, ask "why do you feel you need a different MPC? "What problems, if any, are you having with your current set up?" "What are you looking for?" "What type of playing do you do most often?" Then go from there...ask a qualified player with extensive knowledge and experience.
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