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GETTING STARTED 3


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_bugleboy
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2002 8:31 am    Post subject: GETTING STARTED 3 Reply with quote

So now at week 15 your daily Caruso practice would look something like this.

Six Notes
Regular interval (schedule)
SLS interval (schedule)
LSL Minor 7ths
Harmonic Scale
Chromatic Pedals
Tonguing Exercise

Week 16

Replace the LSL Minor 7ths with the LSL Major 7ths.
Continue practicing all the other exercises.
Start doing the chord pedals starting on the tuning note.

Week 17

Replace the LSL Major 7ths with the LSL 8ths.
Continue practicing all the other exercises. However, if you are able to complete the tonguing exercise then it is time to move up to the next level of tonguing. This next level is from tuning note C to G on top of the staff, executed in the same manner as the original G to C tonguing exercise. You should be able to complete the first one every time before moving up to this new one.
Move the chord pedals up to the next note, p. 35.

Week 18 ***** THE SCHEDULE!! *****

At this time you will have completed one week on each of the LSL intervals and they should now be inserted into the schedule so that you are doing a different one every day. This is how I set up the interval schedule.

Mon...........Reg 2nds.....................SLS 4ths...........................LSL 6ths
Tue...........Reg 3rds......................SLS 5ths...........................LSL Minor 7ths
Wed..........Reg 4ths......................SLS 6ths...........................LSL Maj 7ths/Octaves
Thu...........Reg 5ths......................SLS Minor 7ths...................LSL 2nds
Fri............Reg 6ths......................SLS Maj 7ths/Octaves.........LSL 3rds
Sat...........Reg Minor 7ths..............SLS 2nds..........................LSL 4ths
Sun..........Reg Maj 7ths/Octaves.....SLS 3rds...........................LSL 5ths

This schedule could be set up to cover a three week period, where you would do a different type of interval every day. Or you could completely rearrange the order of intervals. I think Carmine believed that it was better to do different intervals each day of each type (rather than doing 2nds Reg/SLS/LSL on Mon, 3rds Reg/SLS/LSL on Tue, etc.). As I have mentioned, I did the 2nds every day, 7 days a week so, e.g., on Tuesday I would do Reg 2nds, Reg 3rds, SLS 5ths and LSL Minor 7ths.

Another question that may come up is what do you do if you miss a day? The answer. Don't worry about it. Just continue on your normal schedule the next day, or when you start practicing again. Remember this is not a religion, it's a discipline

Move chord pedals to next note.

Week 18 looks like this.

Schedule
Harmonic Scale
Chromatic Pedals
Tonguing Exercise
Chord pedal exercise starting on G on top of the staff

Week 19

Move the chord pedals up to the high C starting note if you are ready. "Ready" means that you are able to get the G on top of the staff. Generally speaking, your starting note for the chord pedals is the next chord note above your highest note, one that you can't play. But the subsequent notes that get succeedingly lower will eventually get back into your playing range.

So, at this point, around 19 - 20 weeks into the Caruso program, You have set up your basic calisthenic practice routine. Some of the exercises, tonguing, chord pedals and harmonics, continue to evolve as your development improves. The tonguing will eventually move up to the G on top of the staff to high C. It ends up an octave higher than where it started, but there is no hurry for this to occur. As I recall it was a couple of years before I was doing the tonguing Six Notes starting on G on top of the staff. And then over the years I would drop back down to eight note exercise starting on the tuning C for a few months and then go back to higher one. And then drop back down again, etc.

Week 20

Start doing the developed scale. Play it slow at around 1/4 note = 120 for a week. Do this each time you go to a new interval. Then increase the speed. Breathe such that there will never be a breath while you are ascending after you reach tuning C. So for the first exercise, which is seconds (yes, the developed scale is really an interval drill), take a breath at measure 8 and then don't take another one until at least measure 15, when you start to descend. The general rule is not to breathe after tuning C when you are ascending.

As the developed scale progresses to larger intervals be careful that there is no rhythmical hesitation on the high note each time. This can start happening around the 5 or 6 note figures.
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<font size=-2>[ This Message was edited by: bugleboy on 2002-11-26 07:40 ]</font>
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Jerry Freedman
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

charly - Could you explain the developed scale ( which I never got to) and the chord pedals which I did but forgot.

J.Freedman
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_bugleboy
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2002 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jerry,

I'm assuming you have MCFB so you know what the initial chord pedal exercise looks like.

MM=60 as usual and you keep the piece on for the duration. There will be a lot of movement by the lips in the mouthpiece on this one as you go from the highest note down to the pedal on each chord. Carmine used to say to really go for the high note at the beginning of each line. Blow it out.

If the high C is too high to start, then you would start on the next note down in the chord, but will still play all the other original chord notes. So then the exercise would start on G on the staff and each subsequent line would all start a fourth lower.

Once the High C is consistent, move the starting note up to the E above (and likewise move all the other lines up a third).

When the high E is consistent move up to the G, 4th ledger line, as the starting note. And you just keep going.

The developed scale is pretty straight ahead. The one thing to be careful about is making the last note of each run connect right back to the next bottom note in the same space as is between each note in the run. This gets to be more of an issue as the runs start to get longer, from around six notes on up.

Do each interval slow for 1 or 2 weeks, then fast for 1 or 2 weeks more. When you have completed them all this way you would put a different one into your schedule each day.
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[ This Message was edited by: bugleboy on 2002-08-15 20:49 ]
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B_Starry
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2002 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


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Last edited by B_Starry on Tue Jun 14, 2005 12:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
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_bugleboy
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2002 5:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brian,

Sometime around week 20 you should have the interval studies incorporated into a daily schedule whereby all of the intervals get played at least once a week. The daily schedule would also include the Harmonics, Tonguing and Pedal exercises, chromatic and chord. The chord pedals continue to expand as does the Harmonic Scale.

All told, this might require 40 minutes of playing time.

There are also othere pedals that can be added. I think I have posted a couple of them

At this time you might want to start adding some other exercise books to your routine done with the Caruso approach. Even if you've worked with them before, Carmine used them as calisthenic exercises. For example.



These three would be a good start and would add another 20 minutes a day of calisthenics.

I've also just posted the Slur 2, Tongue 2 exercise that can be added sometime after week 20.

The idea is that there are almost unlimited different calisthenics that you can schedule for yourself to play each day depending on your available practice time. It is important to be aware that you need to be practicing/playing music also, either from etude books, exerpts, solos, duets, method books, concert band, etc.

Down the road, in a few years, you might decide to cut back on the calisthenics and only use the ones you feel are enough for maintenance.


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[ This Message was edited by: bugleboy on 2002-11-26 10:19 ]
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devin
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 23, 2004 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm getting back into playing after years away from the horn. I actually took some lessons with Carmine in the late 70s and did his exercises for many years before quitting. Here's what I'd like to know. I have about a hour most days to practice, sometimes more. I need to work on a bunch of stuff including big band parts, learning new tunes and chord changes. Years ago, I'd do my Carmines and have nothing left for practicing other things. Is there some way I can alternate between Carmines and the other stuff I have to practice so I don't tire myself out too and cover a fair amount of ground each day?
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JoeCool
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2004 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

devin, check out this thread.


http://www.trumpetherald.com/forum/viewtopic.php?topic=6528&forum=20
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devin
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2004 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

this is really helpful. thanks so much for your response. one more questoin: how many minutes do you rest between your carmines? I'm thinking at least 5 minutes. but I'd like to know what other people do. thanks, devin

[ This Message was edited by: devin on 2004-03-25 12:38 ]
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_bugleboy
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Practice straight out for 20 minutes: 20 - 40 seconds rest between exercises.
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JoeCool
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not quite sure what you mean, devin.

When doing my daily 20-30 min. block, I rest 15 sec. between exercises/second blow. Then I do my other practicing. When doing that, I try to rest as much as I play. Hope this helps.
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devin
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

so you guys play 20 minutes of carmines without stopping for more than about 15 or 20 seconds and then rest for 20 minutes? I've been reading through earlier posts on these threads, and that seems to be what's suggested. I guess my concern is that 20 minutes non-stop of carmines would probably wear me out for the rest of the day at this stage--even with 20 minutes rest. So should I ease into it a little more? I'm starting by just doing the six notes and seconds. Maybe I should wait before adding more than that.

again, I appreciate the input!

[ This Message was edited by: devin on 2004-03-25 15:20 ]

[ This Message was edited by: devin on 2004-03-25 15:21 ]
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Welk
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2004 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is just a guess but... (please correct me if i'm wrong...)

I'll guess that Bugleboy would say something like this:

Either play for 15 than rest 15... but always do 1 for 1 when practicing and do not practice more than 20 minute each time.

Also, as you should not be concern with the sound that come out off your horn, it doesn't even matter if you have crappy sound in you 2nd 20 minute practice.

Or another suggestion is that you can split your Caruso workout. Like doing 6th note/2nd interval/harmonic serie in your 1st practce (take about 10 minute out of the practice if you include the 3-4 minute leadpipe buzzing as warm up) and do other exercice of your choice or pratice some piece for the rest of your 20 minute period. Than in the next practice period, you do others intervals ( S-L-S, L-S-L....)

For my self I usually split my caruso stuff in 2 or 3 practice period.

Hope what I said was right... please correct me if I'm wrong
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devin
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2004 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I get the idea. thanks again. p.s. the carmines are already helping me. even just doing the 6 notes and seconds.
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JoeCool
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2004 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

devin,

If you are just doing the 6 notes and seconds, you will add exercises one at a time. A new exercise each week. Eventually you will work up to 20 min. and have plenty of exercises to choose from in a couple of months. If I do all the exercises, it takes me 40 min. I don't do that tho because of my limited time and they are very demanding calisthenics. But that's the beauty of them. They will help you find great tone/intonation and give you buff chops. I do 20-30min. minutes daily. Once a week or so, I don't do them. Those are really fun sessions as I reap what I have sewn. I have endless(so it seems) endurance and a really strong upper register. I was at a plateau, but just recently added a minor third to my range. I love this stuff.
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devin
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've added thirds. I played the first gig I've had since resuming the CCs. I went from playing single chorus solos to extended choruses. My range expanded, and I had alot more control on the trumpet. The bass player said, "This is the third gig we've played and I notice a big difference."

One complaint: I'm having more trouble playing the flugelhorn than I used to. This isn't keeping me up at night; I figure it's because I'm playing the Carmines on the trumpet. So, for now, that's what my body is adapting to.

But has anybody else out there experienced this?
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_trumpetgod_02
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have never experienced it, because all I play is Bb trumpet.

However,

Try doing a secondary CC regimen on the flugel as well. Try your regular CC stuff on trumpet, and then somewhere in the middle do some flugel practice, and maybe just the 6 notes on the flugel for now, and add more later on... probably slower than you would on trumpet, say a new exercise every two weeks or so. Then be sure to finish your playing for the day on your main axe, trumpet in this case.

That would be my take on things from what I have gathered so far. I wonder what charly has to say about this, because I'm only guessing here... oh well... back to the wood shed... I have an audition coming up in a week. EGAD!

Nick
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JoeCool
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2004 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

devin,

Great to see you having success!

Are you using the same rim on your flugel mpc vs. your trumpet mpc? If not, you might want to. I use the same rim on my trumpet mpc and flugel mpc. Helps to keep the same "feel".
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PH
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2004 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carmine told me that in order to play 2 instruments equally well you needed to practice an equal amount of time on each instrument. I don't know anyone who actually took him at that and did all their calisthenics each day on both trumpet and flugelhorn (or Bb, C, & picc for that matter). However, his point is well taken. I know Art Farmer told me he did Six Notes and the intervals on flugel every day and that he no longer practiced the trumpet. These things work on every instrument (including woodwinds & strings).

I don't play flugelhorn often. However, if I know that I have a recording or a tour coming up with a band that will expect me to play flugel I will do Six Notes, 2nds, and the harmonics on my flugel every day, plus intersperse a limitied amount of time on the flugel into my jazz practice in the week or two leading up to the event.
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_bugleboy
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2004 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it will be helpful to have the same rim on both mpc's.

I also believe that once the embouchure has been developed such that manipulations have been reduced to a minimum, it should be a fairly easy transition from one horn to the other. For me, just noodling around with the flugel for 10 - 20 minutes is enough to get a pretty good feel for it.

I think the same basic embouchure balance that is developed on the trumpet will be suitable on the flugel also. Therefore, I have never spent a great deal of time practicing CC on the flugel. Maybe something like Six Notes and Seconds would be all that is necesary along with some scales and etudes or noodling.
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devin
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2004 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a 3C Mount Vernon on my trumpet and a new 3CW on the flugel. Should I get a 3C for the bigger horn too?
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