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SATDP Lesson 10



 
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Grits Burgh
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 2:31 pm    Post subject: SATDP Lesson 10 Reply with quote

Okay. Seriously. How many of you guys can get through ALL of lesson 10 in a single day?

I just started this lesson today. I realize that as you get better at it, it gets easier. Still, the corresponding Clark Lesson 7 is a real challenge to my endurance. And then, after that, to review Clark lessons 6 and 5? Holy Toledo.

Because of some recent health issues and some travel, I haven't been able to keep up my routine so my endurance and range have taken a bit of a hit, but even in top form, this lesson is a bear.

My current strategy is to do the lesson in two days, vice one.

Warm regards,
Grits
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illegalbugler
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 9:15 pm    Post subject: Re: SATDP Lesson 10 Reply with quote

http://www.trumpetherald.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1434182#1434182

John Mohan wrote:

Seriously, there are a few things to know regarding the book:

Claude wrote it fairly early in his teaching career. As he taught and gained experience, it became clear to him that Systematic Approach builds up material too quickly and most players that follow it exactly as written are over-practicing by the tenth lesson in the book. If you choose to follow the book as written, stay on each lesson for a solid two weeks instead of just one.

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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just think of a Lesson not as one lesson to be taken as a whole, but as a unit of exercises. Divide a lesson into two groups of balanced exercises and then play them as long as you need to before moving on to the next "Lesson". Regardless of the text, there's no timetable. Do them until you're ready to move on.
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solo soprano
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
Regardless of the text, there's no timetable. Do them until you're ready to move on.

"Impatience is the enemy of the ambitious player. The reason is because you are developing and coordinating muscular action and cannot rush ahead any faster than nature will allow."
CG
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Grits Burgh
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies. My post was really a rhetorical question. Basically, I felt like venting.

Breaking the lesson between two days seems to be solving my problem. The problem is not so much time (though time is a big problem) as it is endurance. That Clark #7 exercise is a lip kicker. I just went over it for the first time and I expect that I will be able to play it more efficiently as I learn it, but right now it is just a bear.

The good news is that the lessons really are helping. As long as I can stick to my practice routine, I can play.

Warm regards,
Grits
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John Mohan
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shameless self promotion:

This is why it is almost invaluable to study with someone who studied personally with Claude Gordon during the final 15 to 20 years of his life. Claude did not have me playing a daily routine as long as Lesson Ten is until after a solid two years of studying with him.

I'm glad to hear (but not surprised) that the routine is working out well for you Grits! If you choose to do all of Lesson Ten in a single day, be sure to rest a LOT. There needs to be at least a full hour rest after the SA exercises, and after each of the Clarkes as well. Basically, the routine needs to be spread through the entire day. And as you get to the higher exercises in each of the sub-routines, it is appropriate to rest longer than it took to play the prior exercise before moving onto the next one (resting even twice as long between each is fine).

Best wishes,

John Mohan
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John, much of what you post regarding the" Claude Gordon method" seems to me to be just common sense, that is not, necessarily specific, "Claude Gordon techniques". Yes/No?
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Grits Burgh
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
John, much of what you post regarding the" Claude Gordon method" seems to me to be just common sense, that is not, necessarily specific, "Claude Gordon techniques". Yes/No?


HEY, I DIDN'T KNOW ANY OF THIS STUFF UNTIL I FOUND TRUMPET HERALD. ARE YOU SAYING THAT I DON'T HAVE ANY COMMON SENSE!!!????

You know, some of this stuff is common sense to folks who have had good instructors and have been playing for years. For some of us guys, we can use all the help we can get. I should be embarrassed to admit it, but about a year ago when I first heard a guy play a CG exercise for less than a minute and then rest for the same period of time, I was quite taken aback. I had never seen anybody do that before. That is just the start of the many things that I have learned here. I had never heard of Mark Curry, Jim New, Marcinkiewicz, Getzen, Monnette, Benge, and on and on (oh, and I had more money in my pocket before I heard of those names. )

John's posts (as well as many others') have been enormously helpful to me. For example, before I found Trumpet Herald I had never heard of Claude Gordon and had never set eyes on the Clark Technical Studies, St. Jacome's and the rest of the books in SATDP (well, except for Aban's).

As usual, John's post is correct. Having an instructor would be very helpful indeed. As much as I would love taking lessons from John, Jeff Purtle lives very close to me. I would really enjoy face to face lessons and so he would be my first choice. However, I have decided that until I can get the time to practice for several hours a day, I am going to wait to take lessons. It would be very frustrating to take lessons and not have the time to work on the things that I have learned. I do think that lessons are very valuable, but so is practicing. I don't know that one without the other would do me much good. I just now started lesson 10 in SATDP and I first started on the book about a year or so ago. So, basically, I need to make a lifestyle change to get more practice time in.

Thank you all for your comments.

Warm regards,
Grits
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Schilke HC 1
King Master Cornet (1945)
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John Mohan
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
John, much of what you post regarding the" Claude Gordon method" seems to me to be just common sense, that is not, necessarily specific, "Claude Gordon techniques". Yes/No?


Much (all I hope) of what I post regarding the so-called "Claude Gordon Method" (Claude would argue that no such thing exists), is just common sense because what Claude taught me and others in regard to what, how and when to practice is a very sensible way to approach the trumpet. In fact, the most sensible way, in my opinion.

Basically, Claude used and taught a very systematic and organized way to practice, working one's way through the many great trumpet books such as Arban, Clarke, St Jacome, Ernest Williams, Gatti, Colin, Irons, Walther Smith, and many others, including his own books. As Claude used to say, if he was wrong then Arban, St Jacome, Clarke and all the other Greats were wrong as well because what and how he taught was what and how they taught.

Cheers,

John Mohan
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John Mohan
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Grits Burgh wrote:
As much as I would love taking lessons from John, Jeff Purtle lives very close to me. I would really enjoy face to face lessons and so he would be my first choice.


Nothing wrong with taking lessons in person (or via Skype) with Jeff!

I enjoyed the rest of your post as well. Thank you for the compliments.

Cheers,

John
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EricV
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As usual, John's post is correct. Having an instructor would be very helpful indeed. As much as I would love taking lessons from John, Jeff Purtle lives very close to me. I would really enjoy face to face lessons and so he would be my first choice. However, I have decided that until I can get the time to practice for several hours a day, I am going to wait to take lessons. It would be very frustrating to take lessons and not have the time to work on the things that I have learned. I do think that lessons are very valuable, but so is practicing. I don't know that one without the other would do me much good. I just now started lesson 10 in SATDP and I first started on the book about a year or so ago. So, basically, I need to make a lifestyle change to get more practice time in.

Grits,

For what its worth, i wouldnt wait to take lessons personally, i know what your thinking and i was the same when deciding to start with Jeff but you will have plenty of time for the routines he will start you on.

I recall feeling a bit underwhelmed with my first routine, as it took about 45 minutes to cover some Smith flexibilities, daily trumpet routines, Clarke technical studies #1 single tounged, and Systematic approach lesson 2 part 1 and 11. Fast forward 12 months and i was doing Colin flexibilities and daily trumpet routines, Clarke Technical studies #6 and 8 (alternate days) and systematic approach 12 so you can see it is very much a slow build up and that is the skill in my opinion of these guys who have studied with Claude, knowing what to assign a student and when to change, either add more or sometimes, to reduce the load.

I hope Jeff doesnt mind the detail i have given you here, but i think you would actually hold your progress back by delaying starting the lessons, there is no way in my opinion that Jeff or any of the CG guys would start you off with a 2 + hour routine

Make that call!!

Good Luck
EricV
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Mohan wrote:
Claude would argue that no such thing exists

Thanks, John, that info was what I was asking about.

Grits, I was talking to John, not you. I just wanted to see if there was actually a Claude Gordon method or if it was more a Claude Gordon approach. It still has great value either way.

This is just a question directly to John if, like I said, there was difference between a Method or an Approach. No reflection on you intended, whatsoever.
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"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis." Chet Baker

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Grits Burgh
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani,

Actually, I understood that you were speaking to John. Certainly no offense taken. My response was simply a sophomoric attempt at humor.

I'm a retired U.S. Marine. My feelings don't get hurt very easily.

Warm regards,
Grits
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Bach Stradivarius 37 (1971)
Schilke HC 1
King Master Cornet (1945)
B&S 3145 Challenger I Series Flugelhorn
A bunch of mouthpieces, none of which are the right feel, size, depth or sound - except for my Curry 3FLD.
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