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talkenhorn
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:05 am    Post subject: Repiano Reply with quote

What part should a Repiano player play if there is no Repiano part?
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TKSop
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depends on the others in the section, and the piece in question...

Sometimes that'll mean solo cornet and sometimes second cornet.
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p76
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2018 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Usually solo, but would depend on the part.

Definitely solo if it's a march, we need all the help we can get

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zaferis
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2018 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that's the time that the Repiano player ventures off to make sure there is enough beer for the rest of the section

I'm not a musicologist , but this is where I think it loosely originated...

The ripieno, (Italian for "stuffing" or "padding") is the bulk of instrumental parts of a musical ensemble who do not play as soloists, especially in Baroque music. These are the players who would play in sections marked tutti, as opposed to soloist sections.

It's the floater book, helping the others when needed musically: Cornets, Soprano, & Flugels
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talkenhorn
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2018 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaferis wrote:
I think that's the time that the Repiano player ventures off to make sure there is enough beer for the rest of the section

I'm not a musicologist , but this is where I think it loosely originated...

The ripieno, (Italian for "stuffing" or "padding") is the bulk of instrumental parts of a musical ensemble who do not play as soloists, especially in Baroque music. These are the players who would play in sections marked tutti, as opposed to soloist sections.

It's the floater book, helping the others when needed musically: Cornets, Soprano, & Flugels


You know I think that is the best answer of all. I am very surprised that isn't written in the score "No Repiano in this one so please be a Love and go order a pint for the section."
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RandyTX
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In a large number of older brass band pieces, the repiano and flugel are on the same page. Sometimes identical, sometimes split up divisi, in the same way the solo cornet part is sometimes broken up into 2, 3 or 4 unique lines. It seems less common for this to happen in more modern arrangements.
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iiipopes
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 6:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaferis wrote:
I think that's the time that the Repiano player ventures off to make sure there is enough beer for the rest of the section.

And take-away chicken tikka masala.

Seriously, ask the director. Each piece has its own orchestration. Play whatever the director puts in front of you, whether flugel or one of the other cornet parts, and try not to be jealous of the flugel player.

IMPORTANT: the only reason the repiano and the flugel parts were on the same double page was ease of printing. My folks used to own a print shop. It is easier to print two parts to a larger sheet than each separately. So, the parts were printed two to a sheet of paper, and not necessarily the same part, as with the multiple parts necessary for the cornet choir in general. Since there is traditionally one rep and one flugel, instead of multiple cornets on the other parts (save sop), the rep and flugel parts ended up on the same sheet of paper.

And as posted above, depending on the number of players available, the parts could be doubled to assure someone was covering the part, rep or flugel.

There is a term in American baseball that folks from the UK may not be familiar with: "Utility Infielder." This is a person who is good, versatile, and a true team player. He may be brought in at any time to relieve an infielder, whether from injury or the need for a pinch hitter or runner, and may have to play any infield position on any given day. The rep cornet is a similar player.

And so on down the score. NOTHING is to be assumed just because the rep and flugel parts are on the same sheet of paper.
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RandyTX
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not the one making assumptions here or reading more than was intended into a simple statement of fact.
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talkenhorn
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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2018 9:26 am    Post subject: Repiano Reply with quote

RandyTX wrote:
In a large number of older brass band pieces, the repiano and flugel are on the same page. Sometimes identical, sometimes split up divisi, in the same way the solo cornet part is sometimes broken up into 2, 3 or 4 unique lines. It seems less common for this to happen in more modern arrangements.


That is what I thought, depending on section coverage, if you have a nice balance on all of the cornet parts doubling the Flugal on pieces without a Repiano part.
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talkenhorn
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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2018 9:34 am    Post subject: Repiano Reply with quote

I can see printing 2 parts on one to save money. I know now a days for church music there is often an option to buy, for a little extra money every part on it's own page. It is cheaper to purchase the music where parts are combined on the page.

I appreciate all the input as I am relatively new to British brass banding. German bands are all over the south but not British banding. I am having a lot of fun with it. And just for the know, the British brass bands here seem to drink after the rehearsal, our German bands have rehearsals in the bars. LOL
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Voltrane
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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2018 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nothing before?
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qcm
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2018 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

iiipopes wrote:


There is a term in American baseball that folks from the UK may not be familiar with: "Utility Infielder." This is a person who is good, versatile, and a true team player.


James E. Jackson with the U. S. Coast Guard Band, was the guest conductor of The Classic Brass once and used a similar analogy when I was playing with them.

At one point, he took some time to explain the different sections to the audience.

When he got to the repiano, he described it as the Designated Hitter of the group, someone who had to be a strong and competent player, who often switched from supporting the solo cornets, flugelhorn and the Eb soprano cornet, usually an octave lower in that particular case.

The repiano player also has to have excellent endurance, as they regularly have some pretty heavy playing to do.

It's a very good book to play.

-Dave
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thomasjet123
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2018 4:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my opinion when there is no rep part they should play the solo cornet line. In Salvation Army pieces where there isn't a rep part, they will play the 1st cornet part
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TKSop
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2018 4:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thomasjet123 wrote:
In my opinion when there is no rep part they should play the solo cornet line. In Salvation Army pieces where there isn't a rep part, they will play the 1st cornet part


Salvation army pieces quite often only have 3 cornet parts (solo, 1st, 2nd) which atleast within secular bands winds up getting split as solo=solo, 1st=2nd and 2nd=3rd... and poor mr Repiano gets whichever part the conductor deems appropriate (often 1st, but not always).


The repiano seat is an odd one in that how it's viewed and approached varies wildly - there's often a correlation between seriously it's taken and how "serious" the band is...
By which I mean (in the UK atleast, this is all I can speak for), in championship section the general view is that your rep is as important as your bumper-up and it's viewed as an occaisional soloist seat (which IMHO it is) - in "lower sections" you'll often find the rep seat used as a kind of stepping-stone for developing players who the band wants to push a bit more than they'd get on 2nd cornet (both technically and in terms of responsibility) without putting them on the bottom of the front row where they can hide more easily.

Having said that, these are only generalisations.

Not every band approaches the seat the same, nor every MD - the responsibilities and role of the seat itself are almost as flexible as the player needs to be.
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boog
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2018 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

<<<What part should a Repiano player play if there is no Repiano part?>>>

Boy, try saying that 5 times fast!
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bean_counter
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iiipopes wrote:

There is a term in American baseball that folks from the UK may not be familiar with: "Utility Infielder." This is a person who is good, versatile, and a true team player. He may be brought in at any time to relieve an infielder, whether from injury or the need for a pinch hitter or runner, and may have to play any infield position on any given day. The rep cornet is a similar player.


An old thread, but thought I would put in my 2 cents...

I started on 2nd for the first concert last year, auditioned up to 4th man front row, and for this year the director said I am ‘promoted’ to repiano. He calls it the ‘middle linebacker’ (American football defenseman), sometimes plugging holes in the line, sometimes dropping into pass coverage, generally roving the field. With an occasional solo. Looking forward to it!
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trumpet56
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bean_counter wrote:
iiipopes wrote:

There is a term in American baseball that folks from the UK may not be familiar with: "Utility Infielder." This is a person who is good, versatile, and a true team player. He may be brought in at any time to relieve an infielder, whether from injury or the need for a pinch hitter or runner, and may have to play any infield position on any given day. The rep cornet is a similar player.


An old thread, but thought I would put in my 2 cents...

I started on 2nd for the first concert last year, auditioned up to 4th man front row, and for this year the director said I am ‘promoted’ to repiano. He calls it the ‘middle linebacker’ (American football defenseman), sometimes plugging holes in the line, sometimes dropping into pass coverage, generally roving the field. With an occasional solo. Looking forward to it!


The Repiano is an important part of the cornet line up. Generally speaking the Principal is the number one spot followed by the Soprano Cornet then the Repiano and then the number two Solo Cornet seat. If the Principal is absent for any reason it is the Repiano then moves forward into the Principals seat.
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TKSop
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trumpet56 wrote:
bean_counter wrote:
iiipopes wrote:

There is a term in American baseball that folks from the UK may not be familiar with: "Utility Infielder." This is a person who is good, versatile, and a true team player. He may be brought in at any time to relieve an infielder, whether from injury or the need for a pinch hitter or runner, and may have to play any infield position on any given day. The rep cornet is a similar player.


An old thread, but thought I would put in my 2 cents...

I started on 2nd for the first concert last year, auditioned up to 4th man front row, and for this year the director said I am ‘promoted’ to repiano. He calls it the ‘middle linebacker’ (American football defenseman), sometimes plugging holes in the line, sometimes dropping into pass coverage, generally roving the field. With an occasional solo. Looking forward to it!


The Repiano is an important part of the cornet line up. Generally speaking the Principal is the number one spot followed by the Soprano Cornet then the Repiano and then the number two Solo Cornet seat. If the Principal is absent for any reason it is the Repiano then moves forward into the Principals seat.


The sop is usually a separate question... A different set of skills (more difficult, in most ways) and many principal cornet players wouldn't dare even have a go at it, even at quite serious levels of banding.

Typically repiano is seem as equal to bumper up (assistant principal) in top bands...
But it's often seen as a stepping stone between front and back rows by many lesser bands (which in some ways works, the part sits there in terms of difficulty and holding a part alone can help a developing player to improve.
In between is a mixture.
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trumpet56
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TKSop wrote:
trumpet56 wrote:
bean_counter wrote:
iiipopes wrote:

There is a term in American baseball that folks from the UK may not be familiar with: "Utility Infielder." This is a person who is good, versatile, and a true team player. He may be brought in at any time to relieve an infielder, whether from injury or the need for a pinch hitter or runner, and may have to play any infield position on any given day. The rep cornet is a similar player.


An old thread, but thought I would put in my 2 cents...

I started on 2nd for the first concert last year, auditioned up to 4th man front row, and for this year the director said I am ‘promoted’ to repiano. He calls it the ‘middle linebacker’ (American football defenseman), sometimes plugging holes in the line, sometimes dropping into pass coverage, generally roving the field. With an occasional solo. Looking forward to it!


The Repiano is an important part of the cornet line up. Generally speaking the Principal is the number one spot followed by the Soprano Cornet then the Repiano and then the number two Solo Cornet seat. If the Principal is absent for any reason it is the Repiano then moves forward into the Principals seat.


The sop is usually a separate question... A different set of skills (more difficult, in most ways) and many principal cornet players wouldn't dare even have a go at it, even at quite serious levels of banding.

Typically repiano is seem as equal to bumper up (assistant principal) in top bands...
But it's often seen as a stepping stone between front and back rows by many lesser bands (which in some ways works, the part sits there in terms of difficulty and holding a part alone can help a developing player to improve.
In between is a mixture.


I guess that is why they call the Soprano the suicide seat. I knew a Sopranist who described playing the Soprano was like walking down a busy street naked. The Soprano, Flugel, and Bass Trombone although not essential but necessary providing the band with tonal color. But I digress.
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EricV
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The late Harry Mortimer once said in an interview, the best cornet player plays principal, the next best is his bumper up and the next best should always be the Repiano.
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