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Pocket or Plastic For Aspiring 7 Year Old ?


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Abraxas
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:48 am    Post subject: Pocket or Plastic For Aspiring 7 Year Old ? Reply with quote

Can someone recommend a starter horn for my 7 year old ? She seems to be quite keen on picking mine up and trying. It's only a matter of time before she drops it.
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LSOfanboy
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:50 am    Post subject: Re: Pocket or Plastic For Aspiring 7 Year Old ? Reply with quote

Abraxas wrote:
Can someone recommend a starter horn for my 7 year old ? She seems to be quite keen on picking mine up and trying. It's only a matter of time before she drops it.


Definitely a proper full brass Bb trumpet!

A cheap Yamaha, Jupiter or similar can be purchased new for about £100-£150.

The sound will be so much better than a plastic or pocket trumpet, my opinion would be not to mess around with those at all.

All the best
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mm55
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A full-length trumpet may be difficult for a seven-year-old to hold and support. A pocket trumpet or shepherd's crook cornet places the center of gravity much closer to the body, which would be easier to manage for a small child with short arms. Some pocket trumpets are of better quality than standard student trumpets, but they are priced accordingly. A short student cornet might be the optimal choice.
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mm55 wrote:
A full-length trumpet may be difficult for a seven-year-old to hold and support. A pocket trumpet or shepherd's crook cornet places the center of gravity much closer to the body, which would be easier to manage for a small child with short arms. Some pocket trumpets are of better quality than standard student trumpets, but they are priced accordingly. A short student cornet might be the optimal choice.

I agree with this. And, I bought a Carol Pocket Trumpet and it worked fine.
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LSOfanboy
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mm55 wrote:
A full-length trumpet may be difficult for a seven-year-old to hold and support. A pocket trumpet or shepherd's crook cornet places the center of gravity much closer to the body, which would be easier to manage for a small child with short arms. Some pocket trumpets are of better quality than standard student trumpets, but they are priced accordingly. A short student cornet might be the optimal choice.


Hi,

I played a full size Bb from 6 years old, and I was about the smallest in my school. All my students of that age cope fine.

You will never get a pocket trumpet of the same playability for the price of a student Yamaha or Jupiter student Bb.

If the size is (which it really shouldn't be) a huge issue then I agree that a short student cornet (slightly more expensive) is the way to go.

Seriously, don't even entertain the pocket trumpet thing.

All the best
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amzi
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Put me in the school that endorses cornets for beginners, especially smaller beginners. When my granddaughter (who is tiny) decided she wanted to play I picked up a used cornet (American wrap) and it suits her fine. Unlike her trumpet playing section mates she has no trouble holding the horn up like she should. She sounds good and has become a confirmed cornetist. She has even turned down my offer of a new trumpet saying she wants to play her cornet.
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cheiden
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd recommend a good, used cornet over a plastic or pocket any day. I've played only a few pockets that I didn't hate. The plastics I've tried didn't deliver a fraction of what I like about a brass instrument
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Abraxas
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks folks. I have a nearly indestructible Olds LA Special (as well as a somewhat destructible tri-tone Special) cornets. These are really heavy horns, only 10 grams different in weight. My Reynolds trumpet is considerably lighter by 65 grams. One can sure feel the difference when switching. I get the bit about cornets being smaller but as I suggested, they aren't lighter, at least in the ones that can withstand punishment.

My daughter is just turning 7 in a month as this was to be a birthday gift. She can't hold any of my horns up properly. I heard the plastic Ptrumpets are tough and ultra light. As far as them being notoriously out of tune, I wouldn't expect her to be playing in tune, in any event. My idea was to get her the real thing once she can play C major and maybe a few nursery rhymes.

Unless i got a really good deal on a pocket that plays well (which most of you suggest doesn't exist), I'm still leaning towards plastic for the aforementioned reasons, otherwise it sounds like I maybe need to wait awhile until she gets a bit bigger.
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outskiing
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 1:59 pm    Post subject: Get a Real Mouthpiece Reply with quote

I have both a Tromba plastic flugelhorn and C trumpet and while both play well and can be a lot fun I highly recommend using a good mouthpiece and not the plastic one that probably comes with the horn.
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amzi
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm very familiar with plastic trumpets, even thought about being a stocking dealer for them once, ergonomically you would be better off buying her a plastic cornet--yes they make them. But I would suggest that starting her on a plastic anything would significantly decrease her chances for success, just like a TSO brass instrument would. (TSO="Trumpet Shaped Object", typically foreign made of inferior materials with shoddy workmanship.) The weight of the horn won't be as important as the ergonomics, but there are lighter student cornets than the Olds horns you cited. I started on a Getzen Super Deluxe with the paper thin easy to replace bell and was taught how to take care of my horn, I taught my granddaughter how to take care of hers and her King Master still looks new (I had it overhauled before I gave it to her). No reason your daughter can't do the same thing. Regarding a pocket trumpet--they're typically cumbersome to hold and unless don't shop bottom of the barrel it will likely end up being an infamous TSO that will frustrate her to no end. And by the way, my pocket trumpet weighs as much as some of my trumpets. Do what you want, but it sounds to me like you've already made up your mind.
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Abraxas
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Get a Real Mouthpiece Reply with quote

outskiing wrote:
I have both a Tromba plastic flugelhorn and C trumpet and while both play well and can be a lot fun I highly recommend using a good mouthpiece and not the plastic one that probably comes with the horn.



Yes I saw the Youtube reviews and i have no issue with putting a decent MPC on it. The only unfixable issues I heard so far is intonation. I could care less about it not having an authentic brass sound.
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Abraxas
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

amzi, how would "starting her on a plastic anything would significantly decrease her chances for success"??? She cannot hold onto a brass trumpet or cornet now, so it seems to me to be plastic or nothing at this early stage, from what I'm hearing about pocket trumpets thus far. I certainly had no intent on leaving her on the plastic past the point where she knows how to hold one and maybe do a c major scale. By that time, I'd expect she would be stronger and a bit bigger.
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zaferis
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MY strong vote is for a reasonable BRASS cornet... plastic things are cute, but beyond sounding very different (not a great way to start) aren't very durable, with valve issues.

And I am not a fan of pocket trumpets for beginners or in reality for anyone.
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mm55
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I get the impression that some of you have never played a Benge or Carol(Brass) pocket trumpet. I've also heard good things about Kanstul, Calicchio, and Manchester.
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Abraxas
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

xaferis... As far as durability and valves, the PTrumpet got pretty decent reviews, especially on durability. The only negatives I keep hearing is intonation and of course some complaining that it isn't close enough to a brass sound. there are lots of unbiased reviews on Youtube.
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

About pocket trumpets, I don't think my Carol would have been a disadvantage to a beginner, playing wise at all, but a point that's been made (or implied) is that it might not be as adaptable an instrument as a cornet would be and I agree with that.
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LSOfanboy
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

I'm not sure if its just me, but I am kind of getting the impression that Abraxas's heart is set on a plastic trumpet...

Abraxas, at the end of the day, you are paying for it so do what you want. You have been given lots of advice by many players and hardly any have suggested a plastic instrument, but you continue to show a real enthusiasm for them.

If you really want a plastic trumpet, then get one! At the moment it seems like this thread has started going in circles- its unlikely you're going to receive much endorsement for the plastic idea; if you wanted advice the clear majority on this thread is in favour of a brass cornet, if you have your own individual opinion, go for it, but then there is little point discussing it any further.

Just as a quick side note; Philip Cobb (Principal trumpet of the LSO) was picking up the cornets around his house almost before he could walk. James Fountain (Principal trumpet of the RPO) apparently started the cornet at 3. When the passion is there, a kid can manage, there really is no need for a plastic instrument.

All the best, good luck to your daughter in her studies!
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giakara
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 1:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My vote for a used Getzen 300 cornet.

Regards
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omelet
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would buy whatever instrument you might want to still have for yourself after she has given up on it and picked up some other instrument, unless you are fine with reselling.
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Abraxas
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LSOfanboy wrote:
Hi,

I'm not sure if its just me, but I am kind of getting the impression that Abraxas's heart is set on a plastic trumpet...

Abraxas, at the end of the day, you are paying for it so do what you want. You have been given lots of advice by many players and hardly any have suggested a plastic instrument, but you continue to show a real enthusiasm for them.

If you really want a plastic trumpet, then get one! At the moment it seems like this thread has started going in circles- its unlikely you're going to receive much endorsement for the plastic idea; if you wanted advice the clear majority on this thread is in favour of a brass cornet, if you have your own individual opinion, go for it, but then there is little point discussing it any further.

Just as a quick side note; Philip Cobb (Principal trumpet of the LSO) was picking up the cornets around his house almost before he could walk. James Fountain (Principal trumpet of the RPO) apparently started the cornet at 3. When the passion is there, a kid can manage, there really is no need for a plastic instrument.

All the best, good luck to your daughter in her studies!
I don’t think that is the case at all. I have said, perhaps not enough times, that my daughter cannot hold any brass instrument up for more than a few seconds. Not only does this mean she can’t play it, it also means she is likely to drop it. My whole point in posting this question was to see if there were light weight pocket trumpets that were affordable and good. I also said, ad nauseum, that this first instrument was intended to be a very temporary intro to a real brass instrument.At this age, they grow really fast and have about a ten second attention span, so I don’t expect her to develop skills beyond how to hold it, get a sound out of it and that by pushing those buttons she can change the sound. Ideally if she could learn the C major scale, that would be the signal to transition to a brass instrument. In any event, I’m not sure how many respondents know much about the plastic trumpets as they are getting pretty impressive reviews, save for intonation. Pro players are bringing them to gigs.
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