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Somewhat a beginner Just received the Arban New Authentic Ed



 
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lightcs
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:28 pm    Post subject: Somewhat a beginner Just received the Arban New Authentic Ed Reply with quote

Hi everyone,
I used to play in my schooling days about 33years ago, I just started playing again and a friend of mine from my HS days (gotta love FB with friend connections) told me to get this book. My question is there anywhere online or on here that has like a syllabus on how to go thru the book. Is doing the first studies like warming up too? Because I do struggle to get higher notes(E, F, G). I plan to follow the book to the T. How many exercises to do for each sitting like 1-10. Then how often to continue/repeat doing them each day until doing the next set. It would be really helpful to have somewhat of an idea what others are teaching their students (if you are doing this). Getting a private teacher is not feasible for me at the moment.

Any assistance would be appreciated!
Thank you!
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Dayton
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 1:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome back to trumpet playing! If possible, the best thing you can do at this stage is to take trumpet lessons. Your teacher could help you structure your practice, to include Arban and other books as well.

If lessons aren't possible right now, I strongly recommend that you purchase Eric Bolvin's "The Arban Manual." It will walk you through structured lessons using material from Arban. I believe your edition of Arban is edited by Hooten and Marotta. If so, the edition of The Arban Manual that you should purchase is the "Hooten" edition. Here is a link:

https://bolvinmusic.com/product/arban-manual/?v=7516fd43adaa

Note that you'll read all sorts of comments pertaining to Arban on this site that reference exercises on a particular page. Your edition has spread some of the exercises over multiple pages, so your page numbering will not be the same.

Good luck!
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mafields627
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll second the Arban Manual linked above. My two college trumpet teachers never actually used Arban with me, so I've been using it to work my way through the book.

You could just pick a few from each section, but the way Bolvin takes you through it makes it a lot less daunting.
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JayKosta
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 5:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the notes at top of the staff and higher - getting them reliably and with good sound will take time and practice. There is a huge amount of discussion about how to make a good embouchure (Arban's only gives very basic info). And a whole lot depends on your particular teeth and lips - there doesn't appear to be agreement on something that 'works for everyone'.

I suggest NOT getting a special 'high range' mouthpiece - unless your situation is out of the ordinary, stay with a mouthpiece in the size range of Bach 3-7 .

For getting started, the basic Arban exercises at the front of the book are fine. Play them slow and always strive for the best sound - on pitch, resonant tone, clean sound from the very start, no wavering volume or pitch, make 'music' don't just 'hit notes'.
Don't worry about range - it will come thru practice - not 'arm strength'.

When you're able, the 'popular tune' section of Arban's has good pieces.

Jay
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another vote for Bolvin.
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lightcs
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi everyone.

The book I did receive was the one mentioned above as recommended by a friend of mine:
https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/brass/tp/complete-conservatory-method-for-trumpet-102896.html

The trumpet I have and used wayback when is a Conn Director Shooting Stars (I believe, 1971). The mouthpiece I have and used as well is a Bach 7C which I plan to continue using until when I can start experimenting with other types and sizes.

I will definitely look into the book mentioned above. Anything that will help me return back to my younger playing days to being even better! Missed it a lot.
I am grateful for any advise you provide!

It appears that the "Hooten" version from the link above is only a PDF not printed. Their standard version has a combo PDF/Print. Any suggestions on that? I guess I could use my laptop to view when practicing.

Thanks
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mafields627
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

lightcs wrote:


It appears that the "Hooten" version from the link above is only a PDF not printed. Their standard version has a combo PDF/Print. Any suggestions on that? I guess I could use my laptop to view when practicing.

Thanks


I would just suggest printing out the lesson when you start it. Bolvin suggests spending a week or more on each lesson.
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lightcs
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there, additional question, from the Bolvin link there was a comment in the introductory regarding warms ups:
______________________
Warming Up

One of the shortcomings of Arban is the lack of solid warm up material. Part I of each lesson is designed to be a warm up. Some teachers and students may find this inadequate for a warm up. Therefore, feel free to supplement the lesson plan with a warm up of your choosing. After your warm up, continue with Part I of the lesson.
______________________

Can you direct me to any links on the web that you feel that are good warm ups as the comment above states " Some teachers and students may find this inadequate for a warm up. feel free to supplement the lesson plan with a warm up of your choosing."

Thank you again!
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Billy B
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Bolvin syllabus is good.

However, the Arban book is a resource for teachers to assign particular exercises to address specific areas of a student's development. The original book had no tempo markings and very little as far as dynamics, articulation, etc. It was up to the teacher to advise the student in these areas.


That being said....get a teacher to help you work through the book.
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Dayton
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Can you direct me to any links on the web that you feel that are good warm ups


I haven't researched any web sites, but here are some books that walk you through a fairly comprehensive "generic" warm up.

Eric Bolvin's "The Progressive Warm Up"

Michael Davis' "The 15 Minute Warm Up" and "The 20 Minute Warm Up"

Mark Ponzo's "Daily Warm Ups and Routines"

Michael Sachs' "Daily Fundamentals"

There are many, many other books with great warm up material in them, but not many of them provide directions to walk you through a reasonable selection of exercises to warm you up well. They count on a teacher helping you to put together a warm up that makes sense for you.

Good luck!
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mafields627
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I need a quick warm-up, or need to do a fast maintenance routine, I like to use the 20-minute routine that Greg Wing has put together: https://www.gregwingtrumpet.com/uploads/2/1/4/0/21407028/20_minute_routine_revised_june_2013.pdf.

To be honest, though, I'm warm-up way before 20 minutes. Where the line crosses from warming up to practice is different for each person. If you are working through Arban you might find that a separate warm-up routine is just duplicating what you are doing from Arban.
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EBjazz
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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2019 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, just saw this thread. The Progressive Warm Up is a great way to get started before your Arban: https://bolvinmusic.com/product/progressive-warm-up/?v=7516fd43adaa
And the Hooten version of The Arban Manual is only available in PDF. I don't sell enough of them yet to print it.
And thanks all for the comments!!

Eb


lightcs wrote:
Hi there, additional question, from the Bolvin link there was a comment in the introductory regarding warms ups:
______________________
Warming Up

One of the shortcomings of Arban is the lack of solid warm up material. Part I of each lesson is designed to be a warm up. Some teachers and students may find this inadequate for a warm up. Therefore, feel free to supplement the lesson plan with a warm up of your choosing. After your warm up, continue with Part I of the lesson.
______________________

Can you direct me to any links on the web that you feel that are good warm ups as the comment above states " Some teachers and students may find this inadequate for a warm up. feel free to supplement the lesson plan with a warm up of your choosing."

Thank you again!

_________________
Eric Bolvin
http://bolvinmusic.com/product/the-modern-jazz-trumpet-method/
www.bolvinmusic.com
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Bill_Bumps
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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2019 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JayKosta wrote:
For the notes at top of the staff and higher - getting them reliably and with good sound will take time and practice. There is a huge amount of discussion about how to make a good embouchure (Arban's only gives very basic info). And a whole lot depends on your particular teeth and lips - there doesn't appear to be agreement on something that 'works for everyone'.


I've been playing for only about five months, and I wholeheartedly agree.

Quote:
I suggest NOT getting a special 'high range' mouthpiece - unless your situation is out of the ordinary, stay with a mouthpiece in the size range of Bach 3-7 .


Also true. I spent a great deal of time scouring the internet for information before I bought my mouthpiece, a Bach 7C. The day may (or may not) come when I want to change, but for now, at least, this is the right mouthpiece for me.

Quote:
For getting started, the basic Arban exercises at the front of the book are fine. Play them slow and always strive for the best sound - on pitch, resonant tone, clean sound from the very start, no wavering volume or pitch, make 'music' don't just 'hit notes'.
Don't worry about range - it will come thru practice - not 'arm strength'.


Also true. I now use the first couple of pages of Arban's as warmups. Working for the best tone and pitch has helped me greatly.
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