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Hesitation to learning trumpet as an adult



 
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mickael57280
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Joined: 25 Jul 2018
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:27 am    Post subject: Hesitation to learning trumpet as an adult Reply with quote

Hi, let me explain.

As an teen I played trombone 5 years (learning both classical and jazz) and quit for some reasons.

20 years later I want to come back but on trumpet because my main axe is bebop hard bop modal things and I have developped a love for trumpet.

I have an hesitancy to try because I know what it means to learn an instrument and as an adult with a full time job and a family I don't know if I can manage to practice an hour a day in the long run and I don't know what to expect of an hour a day.

After 3 or 4 years I would love to find a small formation to play standards with once a week an having fun.

If some of you have somethin, to say about that I would be grateful.

Thank you
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kehaulani
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Joined: 23 Mar 2003
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You don't know what you don't try. Go for it and let the chips fall where they may.
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cheiden
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Joined: 28 Sep 2004
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Location: Orange County, CA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd recommend renting a horn and signing up for a finite number of lessons with a pro. Then give it a few months to see how natural or unnatural the smaller mouthpiece is for you, and how quickly you improve.
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JayKosta
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Joined: 24 Dec 2018
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Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes certainly give it a try! Your early experience with t-bone is a huge help. Trumpet mouthpiece is smaller, but should be easy to adapt, fingering is simple, and learning treble clef is no biggie.

No need to spend lots of money, get a used 'student model' horn from a shop, craigslist, Goodwill, etc. You can probably find something decent for $200 or less. And a simple beginner's instruction book is adequate to learn fingering, and basic playing.

Jay
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cgaiii
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Joined: 26 Jun 2017
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Location: Virginia USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with the above. You know how to learn a brass instrument. It is work, but you should have fun, fun being defined by progress with effort. A teacher is the best asset you can get.
I would get a used trumpet in good shape. You might get advice about one from trumpet/trombone doublers about mouthpiece and horn. (Perhaps on a trombone forum.) You can always sell a decent rig if it does not work.
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Dayton
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Joined: 24 Mar 2013
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Location: USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 29, 2020 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't hesitate. Give it a try. The most important thing you can do is to get some lessons from a good teacher. That will get you off to a good start, and minimize the frustrations you'll experience.

The amount of time you have available to practice, how you practice and what you practice combine to dictate how quickly you'll progress. So, you might not have a lot of time, but if you work with a teacher on what and how to practice you may be able to achieve your goal (though I'd say 4-6 years may be more realistic than 3-4 years unless you already read music well and are conversant in bebop).

Good luck, and have fun!
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mdarnton
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Joined: 08 Mar 2019
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Location: Chicago

PostPosted: Sat Feb 29, 2020 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a long time string and keyboard person. When I turned 70 just a year ago I decided I needed to do something completely different, and since I've been listening to a lot of jazz in the last few years, chose trumpet. After a few months to see if I liked the idea, self-learning on a Mendini from Amazon (not as bad as the rumors--once I got the valves working right. But fixing musical instruments is my work)--I bought a good horn, found a teacher, and donated the Mendini to a school music program.

It's been the hardest instrument I have ever learned and yet it's possible. My goal is similar to yours, and I think that it is within reach. I am hoping eventually to find a guitar player who's equally as bad as I am when the time comes, and have some fun, that's all.

People will say not to skip getting a teacher, and though I'm an avid autodidact, this is different. You can definitely learn to make notes on your own if you're good at filtering the internet but there's a whole bunch of conventions/difficulties unique to this instrument that you probably won't figure out without someone right there listening and correcting in real time.
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cgaiii
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Joined: 26 Jun 2017
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Location: Virginia USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mdarnton wrote:
... I'm an avid autodidact, this is different. You can definitely learn to make notes on your own if you're good at filtering the internet but there's a whole bunch of conventions/difficulties unique to this instrument that you probably won't figure out without someone right there listening and correcting in real time.


This is very well stated. +1
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Bb: 1995 Schilke X3L AS SP, Yamaha YTR-6335S
C: Kanstul 1510-2 (SP) (circa 2000)
Picc: 2001 Kanstul 920 (SP)
Bb Bugle: Kanstul
Bb Pocket: Manchester Brass
Natural/Baroque Tr: Altenburg (raw brass)
Bass Tr: Mack Brass stencil (Jin Bao) (SP)
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Bill_Bumps
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Joined: 07 May 2019
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mdarnton wrote:


It's been the hardest instrument I have ever learned and yet it's possible


Yeah, true. Have been playing the clarinet since I was eight. About a year and a half ago, I decided to take up trumpet, and it really is difficult, in a physically-demanding way that the clarinet isn't.

But I've been plugging away, getting in a hour a day practicing (barring any unexpected emergencies). And although I'm still a long way from where I want to be, I can honestly say I'm starting to get it.

It takes patience, lots of it, and a love of the trumpet sound.
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JetJaguar
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It doesn't matter if you roll your pants up to your ankles or take them completely off. Just start wading in.
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cheiden
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2020 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the clear consensus here is, yes, by all means do start on trumpet. Confirming the old adage that misery loves company.
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Charles J Heiden/So Cal
Bach Strad 180ML43*/43 Bb/Yamaha 731 Flugel/Kanstul 920 Picc/Conn 80A Cornet
Bach 3C rim on 1.5C underpart
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Diesel528
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Joined: 26 Mar 2020
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just started back myself. I bought a 1 yr old Bach and now have a my first lesson with a bro. I kept making excuses and then I remembered, The phrase, “I can’t,” denotes a lack of investment as opposed to a lack of potential or ability. ...
Given the right purpose and enough time, you can. — Rob Jones

Get after and have FUN!
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A.N.A.Mendez
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Joined: 27 Jul 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember the frustration as a kid, learning. I also remember one day, after what seemed like a long time you go over a hump, a crest, and you are making music. That is the brass ring.
I tried to learn piano about 10 years ago, I rented one, got lessons, REALLY applied myself.
I thought hey, I play trumpet, I can do this....
NOPE....
I REALLY tried, I gave it 6 months.... Could not get it.
But. I can still pick up my Olds Super and play, make music. That is so special in life. A way to communicate that not everybody can do.
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Jerry
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, do it.

I'd recommend starting with a large trumpet mouthpiece. It will probably feel tiny to you.
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multiphonic
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Joined: 14 Oct 2019
Posts: 139

PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a trombonist at heart and switched to trumpet about a year ago. I would start with a standard mouthpiece (7Cish in my case) and play as much as you can.

It took a few days to wrap my head around to reading treble clef and learning the associated fingerings. It wasn't at all difficult to convert from mediocre trombonist to mediocre trumpeter.

Oddly enough, I've recently started playing soprano trombone. I was concerned about learning treble slide positions, but it's been the easiest transition so far.
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