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pedal tones



 
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tcutrpt
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Joined: 10 Nov 2001
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2002 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My professor is having me work on some Stamp exercises this semester and I have a question. I understand that the embouchure is not supposed to change as one decends into the pedal range. I am currently unable to keep my setting the same. What are some things to be aware of when i decend that might help. Also, if I work at it for a few weeks and still am having trouble, is it possibly an embouchure problem? I have worked on pedals in the past and have never even gotten close to keeping the same setting, no matter how hard I've tried. Thanks.

Matt
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ScottA
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2002 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it safe to assume that you are doing the buzzing exercises before attempting them on the horn? This made a huge difference for me. If you can get it right on the mouthpiece while matching pitch with a piano adding the horn becomes fairly simple if you keep your approach the same.

At one point Mr. Stamp had me slide the mouthpiece into the horn while I was buzzing a pedal Eb and Bingo! The note was right there. Give it a try.
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trumpetdave
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Joined: 27 Feb 2002
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2002 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would recommend staying with the same setting, but increase the volume of air. I find when doing Stamp, if the pedals do not come out well, I apply some of Jim Thompsons Buzzing Basics concepts. You may want to try to glissando down to the pedals at first. Once you can gliss down without changing your setting, than try play the excercises as is.

Hope this helps,

Dave
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tcutrpt
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2002 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I've been doing the buzzing first. I will work on getting the pedals to come out easy while buzzing and then apply it to the horn. At the present time, I'm not really able to keep the same setting even while buzzing to play the pedals, but I'll work on it. Thanks for the replies.

Matt
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trumpetherald
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2002 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As prep to playing the pedals on the horn, I'd suggest learning to play low g and low f# open and 2nd valve, respectively. So, you can play the low g 1-3, then pop all the valves up and play it open while holding the same pitch and maintaining mechanics. Same idea with the f#. Try it and see if it helps. The feel for the open low g and 2nd-valve low f# is the same as that for the pedal tones.
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_trumpetgod_02
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2002 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey,
I think that you may be having a little complication with the idea of keeping your setting the same. YES you should not have to reset your lips to the mpc so they are more spread apart to get the pedals to sound. But you will find that in playing pedal tones that your lips will kind of come together and away from the teeth ( best way to describe it with words ) so that they can relax enough to get the pedals to speak. Your lips will feel different from what they feel like when you are playing a G above the staff, but they should still have the same setting to the mpc. ( I am refering to ratio of top lip vs. bottom, but you probably already knew that.)
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1B
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2002 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As you descend into the pedal register, think of moving as little as posssible. This really helped me.
1B
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HighQ
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Joined: 08 Dec 2002
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Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2002 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got somewhat the same problem. I'm able to play a couple of the pedals right (down till about e-flat/d), but then it really gets hard. If I want to play a pedal C, I really have to change my mouthpieceangle, so that my lowerlip can get out of the way, otherwise it doesn't come (without valves that is) at all. I tried to reach it with all valves closed, but most of the times I can't get down there and if I do it sounds really ****ty. Should I be patient and just keep practising it more (been doing it for a week now), or am I doing something wrong?
Thanks for your suggestions upfront.

Jerry.
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hazmat
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2003 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some people just have the problem of the low C without the valves. I know that I can play it (using LOTS of air) fairly well. Many of my teachers cannot get a good sound without the valves. That is not to say they are bad players. I wouldn't worry about it so much. That is the reason that the alternate fingering is there.

Oh and yes if you are getting a sound on it then try using lots of air. It might come it might not. I'm not an expert (Stamp is the expert) but I would still have to say that using the valves or not is not a big deal. When I play the exercises I find that using the valves keeps the sound consistent in the lower register and easy to slur up from.

[ This Message was edited by: hazmat on 2003-11-06 09:53 ]
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trumpetherald
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2003 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

I've got somewhat the same problem. I'm able to play a couple of the pedals right (down till about e-flat/d), but then it really gets hard. If I want to play a pedal C, I really have to change my mouthpieceangle, so that my lowerlip can get out of the way, otherwise it doesn't come (without valves that is) at all. I tried to reach it with all valves closed, but most of the times I can't get down there and if I do it sounds really ****ty. Should I be patient and just keep practising it more (been doing it for a week now), or am I doing something wrong?
Thanks for your suggestions upfront.


The low c is tricky because it wants to be *very* flat - as low as a Bb is where it may want to lie at first. If you are having to shift that much to get a low c I'd recommend being cautious with the arpeggiated studies - cuz going down to the c and shifting, then moving back up with the shifted embouchure may not be constructive.

To get a good feel for how the low c should work, play it on a flugelhorn. Because of the conical bore, it's much easier to play and it's in tune. Once you get that concept in mind, then move to the trumpet. It won't be as resonant, but you'll have a head start on it.

TD
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DSanchee
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Joined: 26 Nov 2002
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2003 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good tip on getting that pedal C open is to play while you hold the spit valve open on the tuning slide. It makes the open C speak more easily, then slowly close the valve but keep the same setting.
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TrumpetEnthusiast1
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Joined: 26 Dec 2002
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2004 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The pedal C is flat because of the trumpet's shape so don't worry about it as much. I believe Nick Drozzdoff (a pro trumpet player and physicist) said this was due to "structural trickery" to get the horn to play in tune in its normal octaves.
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trombaJ
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Joined: 29 Mar 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2004 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cannot emphasize how much better the pedals worked in the buzzing portion when I did them with a piano, and NOT a tuner.
Stamp, as understood by Thibaud and the BIM edition allows for playing the pedal C with 1-2-3 valves at first, unitl you get used to it. I found this to be helpful as well.
Another good way to get used to the pedal register is an expansion of what one of the previous posts recommended, which is to play a low F# 1-2-3, then without breaking, 1-3, 2-3, 1-2, 1, 2, and open. It will force you to really get a supple, relaxed embouchure.

Jordan
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