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Reports of Callet Clinic at ITG


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tptguy
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 7:33 am    Post subject: Reports of Callet Clinic at ITG Reply with quote

“Hearing is Believing”
by Dr. Kyle Schmeer, D.M.A.

Jerome Callet ITG Clinic
Rowen University, New Jersey
June 9, 2006

We’ve all heard the expression, “Seeing is believing”. In a dramatic two hour clinic at the International Trumpet Guild Conference at Rowen University, Jerome Callet convincingly demonstrated to a packed room of very serious trumpet students from around the globe that the phrase should be “hearing is believing”!

The clinic began with a gracious introduction by Indiana University faculty member, renowned jazz performer, and ITG board representative, Pat Harbison. Pat encouraged everyone to listen up as he presented Mr. Callet, “a living legend”. Pat explained that he was first introduced to Jerome in the 1970’s as he quizzed excellent players like Mac Gollehon playing marvelously with seemingly no limits. Mac, generously assisting with today’s clinic, responded with humor, “Well it’s Jerry Callet’s fault”!

With that introduction, Mac, one of N.Y.’s most respected professionals, sporting a resume of over 800 recordings with musicians as diverse as Buddy Rich to Mick Jagger, was joined by fellow Callet-student, Herb Smith, an Eastman graduate and current member of the Rochester Philharmonic. Mac and Herb proceeded to dazzle the appreciative audience with excerpts from the jazz and classical repertoire spanning five full octaves from the double pedals to double high C – all performed with huge sound, tremendous power, crisp intonation, and astounding flexibility. The climax of the presentation featured the two virtuosi trading 8’s on jazz tunes that left the crowd applauding for more.

To begin his discussion of what he has learned from more than fifty years of a nearly religious quest to uncover the shared traits of the world’s greatest trumpet masters Mr. Callet picked up his horn cold, fully exhaled all his air, then glissed in a seemingly effortless manner from double pedal C to a huge double high C. He asked, “How’s that for a 76 year old man who hasn’t touched a horn in six days?!”

Mr. C. explained that he had transformed himself from a broken down forty year old, who diligently following the instructions of his many renowned teachers yet could not play a decent high C, into one of the most powerful players in the world. His trumpet feat proved his case. With the ease of someone who has recounted his discoveries thousands of times to appreciative students around the world, Jerome had the audience asking for more.

At that time, Jerome introduced his most recent student, Yuriy Kravets. He asked him to play a classical excerpt of his choice. Though only 18 years old, Yuriy played impressively with a big centered sound and excellent technique. Jerry explained that Yuriy had taken just one lesson and merely two days earlier. Surely, Yuriy hadn’t gained that much musicianship in two days, so what’s the big deal? Jerry then instructed Yuriy to play in his “old manner”. The difference was startling! Gone was the big centered sound while the intonation and flexibility struggled. There was no mistaking the dramatic difference that a single lesson had made. Asked if he would like to go back to his old system, Yuriy exclaimed with a big smile, “no way”!

Next, Mr. Callet explained in great detail the essentials of his teachings that he now calls “the tri-labial embouchure”. It is his firm belief that great embouchures rely on concentrated development of both upper and lower lips in conjunction with a fully forward tongue. The tongue is shaped into a wedge between the open teeth. In this essential position the tongue supports and protects the lips while simultaneously creating tremendous air pressure inside the mouth. But as we say, “hearing is believing”.

Jerome urged all members of the audience to come forward and put his theories to the test. A few tepid guinea pigs stepped forward. With each student, whether 9 years old or 80, professional or amateur, he repeated the same routine. First, he had them play a low C scale in their traditional manner. Then, he instructed them individually with his specific placement of the tongue and unique use of air. After that, he had them play the C scale again. In each case, the significant improvement in sound, intonation, and ease of production was so dramatic that other audience members promptly jumped to get in line. Each player’s striking transformation, several dozen in all, was greeted with rousing applause.

Mr. Callet concluded his clinic with a helpful question and answer session. He instructed the audience to “ask me anything”. The sincerity of his teaching was visible to all. In dramatic fashion, he had proven to the appreciative audience that significantly improved performance and much greater ease of production are within reach of us all. As so persuasively demonstrated, “Hearing is believing”.


Last edited by tptguy on Tue Jun 13, 2006 7:37 am; edited 2 times in total
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tptguy
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

By Galen Tromble - Silver Spring, MD

OJ - The clinic was well-attended. Jerry had a youngster there who had taken a lesson from him 2 days before, and could demonstrate his playing the old way and with TCE. I hadn't seen Jerry in person before, but I've read descriptions of his clinics before, and this one seemed to fit the mold.

Jerry also had a couple of 'pros' there -- one who plays with the Rochester NY symphony and another from New York -- I didn't catch their full names. Both did demonstrations, and played quite well.

The real fun started when Jerry asked for people to come up and he'd show them how to spit buzz. The TCEer's here will know that he listens for any drop in pitch at the end of the note -- that tells him that the player is bringing their tongue back - rather than keeping it forward.

The results seemed pretty impressive -- all the participants noticed an immediate improvement in their sound and in the ease of making it.
I'll insert that I had been struggling a bit of late with my own playing- I was OK above the staff but too inconsistent in the mid-range. The clinic reminded me to keep my tongue forward, and in just a couple of days most of my problems have gone away, and the high range is even easier and more secure.

So, I'm very glad I went to Jerry's session.

Galen Tromble
Silver Spring, MD
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JAZZ-PLAYER-COLLECTOR
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, this was absolutely awesome! Thanks so much for the reviews
and thanks to Mr. Callet as well for his many years of contributing to
the trumpet playing community. I was first introduced to the forward
arched tongue in 1975 with Jerome's book "Trumpet Yoga". I always
knew that he was on to something big... His methods have withstood
all critical analysis and the test of time!! Hearing really IS believing!!

Tom in Texas
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razeontherock
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting this Kyle. I grew up in NJ - never thought I'd wish to be back LOL!! Hopefully my Dad caught this ...
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Steini
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, you all. Can anybody explain the difference between “the tri-labial embouchure” and TCE, if there is any? Does Mr. Callet have a new diagram for this set up or is it similar to the ones in Trumpet Secrets?

Thank you. Steini.
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cleanhead77
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks so much for these postings. When I lived in NYC before 1976 Jerry and I became friends. I took lessons from him and he had me up to G above hi C when I left and moved to Florida to join Disney's musicians. I kept in touch with Jerry and when his great trumpets started production I became a Callet dealer, selling those great SOLOS, GRAN PRIX'S, JAZZ,and SUPERCHOPS trumpets. Today Jerry is a "Living Legend"
and revered as a trumpet guru throughout the world.His trumpets sell used for more than they did new years ago.
It was not always thus:
35 years ago the trumpet world, especially a clique headed by a certain member of the LA symphony, treated Jerry as a joke, and his methods of teaching and trumpets as worthless. When Jerry came out with the first heavyweight mouthpiece they all laughed. I wonder what those individuals think now?
Congradulations, Jerry. I'm proud to have known you.

Bill Barnes
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trumpetboy17
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, I am an NY all-state trumpet player who is interested in music as a living. I have been able to hit C's since 5th grade, and now, in 11th, my C's are a lot more solid, but I still can only hit up to a F or G on a good day. I just bought a callet NY horn also, do you think it is worth it to try out the callet mouthpeices/methods? Thanks
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_dcstep
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trumpetboy17 wrote:
Hello, I am an NY all-state trumpet player who is interested in music as a living. I have been able to hit C's since 5th grade, and now, in 11th, my C's are a lot more solid, but I still can only hit up to a F or G on a good day. I just bought a callet NY horn also, do you think it is worth it to try out the callet mouthpeices/methods? Thanks


Callet's TCE is incredibly effective, but, I suspect, you're current instructor will [be distressed] if he or she finds you experimenting with TCE. Where do you live in NYState? It's one of the few places that you might find a qualified TCE instructor. The G is good solid range that will continue to solidify with your current instruction and diligent practice, working to reduce stress and support your upper range. I'd really only recommend TCE to a young person if they have a qualified TCE instructor.

Dave

6/19/06: edited by moderators. Profanity, including thinly disguised, is prohibited by your user agreement. Do refain.
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trumpetboy17
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i live in central long island, but not too far from the city. i will be going to college in the fall of 2007, so i will have a new private teacher soon. but my current private teacher is very understanding, and is all about trying new methods and books and techniques.
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tptguy
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TrumpetBoy17, Personally, I wouldn't worry about mouthpieces and methods as you are so close to Mr. Callet you can easily make a personal visit. He'll give you the best advice. There are many around the world who would desperately like to be in your position. Call him up, give it a couple of months of serious effort. I can't imagine you will ever go back to older methods.

Additionally, I wouldn't worry too much about other private teachers. In my pretty extensive experience, I've found that most private teachers recognize their own limitations quite early. A good teacher will expose you to their area of expertise while granting you freedom to explore other areas they aren't as versed in. If you are unfortunate enough to be assigned a teacher that is more interested in tradition than progress be polite and respectful but be your own person. Just my 2 cents. Best regards, Kyle


Last edited by tptguy on Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:17 pm; edited 2 times in total
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trumpetboy17
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 6:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you go down to mr.callet he will persoanlly work with you on it?
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razeontherock
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup - and it's the best way. Good luck, and keep us posted!
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trumpetboy17
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

how much does it cost, and how can I contact him and ask?
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Forte
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trumpetboy17 wrote:
how much does it cost, and how can I contact him and ask?


For a 1 hour lesson he usually charges $50. I have spent a huge amount of money on airfare, hotel rooms, and taxi's just for 2 visits. All you have is a 30 minute drive (I am guessing). If you are even marginally serious about different methods of embouchure GO TAKE A LESSON WITH MR. CALLET! I would start a life of crime to be in your position. In fact, I am almost shuddering in ecstasy simply imagining what I could do with regular lessons in person with the GURU (alright, that was a mild exaggeration). Really, I am surprised that more crazed trumpet students in the NYC area our age are not breaking down his door for more lessons.

Go to www.super-chops.com for his phone number or you can e-mail him to setup a time. If you call him, I suggest not calling him on a Saturday because that is his busiest day.

Thanks,
Robert
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Blancolate
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 02, 2006 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see that he had Mac Gollehon demonstrating his system. Just wondering when Mac came to use the Callet method. He has been a powerhouse for many years. I have worked out of his book "Embochure Update" which was published in the late 90's and there doesn't seem to be any talk in that book about the Callet system.
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Shabbs
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing,I gotta try TCE.Holy crap Kyle i didn't know you had a doctorate.
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tptguy
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shabbs, I kinda just picked it up along the way! :>)

Did my undergrad at Colgate and Berklee. Studied with Bob Siebel, Lou Mucci, Wes Hensel, and Ray Kotwika at Berklee. My masters was in trumpet performance under Don Reinhardt at Combs College in Philadelphia and I did my jazz studies with Adolph Sandole. But I was struggling so much with my chops that I switched to composition for my doctorate. That was under Romeo Cascarino, also at Combs. He was a great joy to study with and he helped me in so many ways. I was lucky that I needed to make the move, otherwise I would have missed out on so much with Romeo. Later, I ran into Jerry Callet and he finally straightened my chops out. Lets me work on the brutal jazz studies that Adolph gave me!
- Kyle
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Shabbs
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow man, but you did it. I did a summer program at Berklee when i was 15.
My theory prof. was Wayne Naus and he tried to turn me on to big bore horns, good guy. I also had this other guy named Bill Schism? i think. He was kind of a jackass..But i will never forget this dude i had for lab ensemble, He looked just like Prince and was a smokin' guitarist named Anthony Peterson. Man we had so much fun that summer and it was an extremely humbling experience...Wow i haven't thought about that in years(lol)

P.s By the end of the summer i had really screwed up my chops by never resting.
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tptguy
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My 2 years at Berklee were definitely the most fun I've had in my whole life. Every day was a huge learning experience and every day was a ball. My harmony teacher was Bill Pierce - after he played with Stevie Wonder and before Art Blakey. I also met my future wife while at Berklee and she's still the most wonderful thing I took away from there! :>)

<<P.s By the end of the summer i had really screwed up my chops by never resting.>>

I promise you, get TCE together and you will never, ever beat up your chops again. All the stress comes off the lips and goes to the tongue. The tongue builds tremendous strength and recovers almost instantly. I encourage everyone to give it a serious try; by far, it's the best thing that ever happened to my trumpet playing. Berklee didn't help my chops but it laid a great foundation for all my future music endeavors. As Adolph Sandole use to tell me, "Berklee students make the best beginners for the study of improv!" :>) Stay well, Kyle
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deejaymushone
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow - was just talking to Yumiko about this - I never new he did a clinic at the ITG - this is great - - >>
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