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Daily routine for a 3 hour session



 
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Rod Haney
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:19 pm    Post subject: Daily routine for a 3 hour session Reply with quote

I am a 2 year comeback player and have worked my daily play up to
A consistent 3 hours a day. My warmup is about 40 minutes and I usually rest and do chores for an hour. Then I do 25 minutes of scale work then 35 minutes of range, flexibility, and whisper tones. I generally then chore and do errands for at least an hour. I don't read well so I spend the next 30 minutes trying to perfect exercises I learn and about a half hour reading or learning new exercises. I usually have stuff to do in the afternoon and after dinner I will spend at least an hour playing along with Spotify.

I'm getting play time in and my tone is good and my range is better than ever, but I really don't have a lot of direction. I have a good ear and can usually learn anything but exercises aren't exactly music and are designed to build skill. I would have to say that I am a strong beginner as far as reading but strong intermediate as far as play/sound (after I learn the piece). I have sometimes range to hi g and can count on the e, have pedal c and can slur the pedal to low c cleanly so I'm not just starting. I need recommendations on a good book that I can stay with for 4-5 months that will help me with just generally getting stronger and taking my play to 4-5 hours a day. I'm obviously retired so time isn't a deal. Also I live in WV and would love to find someone to get me reading strongly. I also question how to space my play it's fairly haphazard
Thanks
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1jazzyalex
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eric Bolvin's advertising a warm-up routine on here, I'm contemplating buying it myself.

Linky here: https://bolvinmusic.com/product/progressive-warm-up/
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halfgreek12
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Charlier etudes are great.

Steve
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Rod Haney
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1jazzyalex wrote:
Eric Bolvin's advertising a warm-up routine on here, I'm contemplating buying it myself.

Linky here: https://bolvinmusic.com/product/progressive-warm-up/


I have his progressive warm up and use some of his stuff when I do my scale practice as he's really good about noting chords for all his stuff. This really helps me as I am an ear player.

I guess I'm looking more for a routine to build strength. I really want to start getting an hour on targeted exercise and an hour reading but I can't get strong enough to do this. I do try to rest a bit when I play but frequently find myself playing 15 or more minutes with no rest, I just get into what I'm doing but I don't think I'm strong enuf to play like that yet and sometimes hurt my efforts by doing it?
Thanks Blovin stuff is great and you learn unconciously
Rod
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lakejw
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like you have a pretty good warm-up routine already. If you were interested in jazz, you could always get a nice transcription book, like the Clifford Brown book, or the 28 Modern Jazz Trumpet Solos, and there is also a new Wynton Marsalis book out. Those are fun to learn and play along with the original recordings.
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trombahonker
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Merri Franquin's method, and read up on how many of the prominent players of the world have utilized it.
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ghelbig
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Daily routine for a 3 hour session Reply with quote

Rod Haney wrote:
I need recommendations on a good book that I can stay with for 4-5 months that will help me with just generally getting stronger and taking my play to 4-5 hours a day.

Couple of things that I did that might work for you.

My first recommendation is to get a copy of "The Practice of Practice". I can not recommend this book strongly enough - period.
https://thepracticeofpractice.com/

The second is Sigmund Hering. He wrote many etude books, my top 3 are:
1) 40 Progressive Etudes
2) Thirty Two Etudes
3) Twenty-Four advanced Etudes

This list is in the order of difficulty. To start the 32-Etudes book you need to be comfortable with the top-of-staff G. The 24 Advanced is appropriate when you can play the 2-ledger-line high C.

What you said about your ability says that you're in line for the 1st one - 40 progressive.

What I did with that one was to start at the beginning and:
Work on the current etude trying to get it up to the indicated tempo. I would play it once or twice without a metronome so that I could hear the melody, then I would play with the metronome.
When I knew that I wasn't going to make any more progress that day (the practice of practice provides insight) I played at the next few until I was tired enough for the session. I never let a session go past 30 minutes, 20 is typical.

Once I had an etude up to tempo, I moved on to the next etude. Once I finished the book, I moved on to the next one.

Anyway, that's what worked for me. It increased my endurance and reading skills.

It's easy to fall into a routine of technical studies and range drills. Don't do that. Spend 1/2 of your playing time - at least - just playing music. Playing music is the goal - studies are just a path to the goal.

$.02,
Gary.


Last edited by ghelbig on Sun Jul 16, 2017 11:30 pm; edited 1 time in total
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1jazzyalex
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rod Haney wrote:


I have his progressive warm up and use some of his stuff when I do my scale practice as he's really good about noting chords for all his stuff. This really helps me as I am an ear player.


Same here, lazy ol' ear player. I've been doing some busking and I'm no more likely to take sheet music than I am to bring along a pet llama.

Anything that helps my reading is good. I guess I should get that book.

BTW his name isn't blovin, it's Bolvinator.
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Dayton
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 12:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I need recommendations on a good book that I can stay with for 4-5 months that will help me with just generally getting stronger and taking my play to 4-5 hours a day.... I guess I'm looking more for a routine to build strength.


Hi. Sounds like you want a book you can follow to help you build strength. The best one I am aware of is Claude Gordon’s “Systematic Approach to Daily Practice.” It’s a bit of a misnomer to say that it is “one” book as it contains lessons that also have you working out of Clarke’s “Technical Studies,” Walter Smith’s “Lip Flexibility,” “Saint Jacome’s “Grand Method,” Charles Colin’s “Lip Flexibilities” and probably others I cannot remember.

You might want to consider a few (online) lessons with one of Claude Gordon’s former students to help understand how to approach his method. I believe that Eric Bolvin, Bruce Haag, Matt Graves, John Mohan and Jeff Purtle -- all of whom post on TH at least occasionally -- offer lessons.

Here are a few other options to consider:

Bill Knevitt’s “The Ultra Trumpet Crash Course for Home Study” or “Professional Trumpet Routines” (Knevitt was a student of Claude Gordon; his books and approach are similar to Claude Gordon’s approach)

Charley Davis’ “A Tribute to William Adam: His Teachings and His Routine.”

Donald Reinhardt’s “The Reinhardt Routines” and/or Rich Willey’s “Focal Point.”

As an aside, are you a member of a community band or some other group? If not, I’d urge you to join one. Participating in a group is a great way to build your reading skills, focus on your intonation, and generally improve your musicianship in ways that are difficult to do with solo practice. If there isn’t a group nearby, it sounds like you have the time to drive an hour once a week to join a group.

Good luck!
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1jazzyalex
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bolvin also has a book that plans one's work through the Arban's, into a number of lessons, 30-odd, maybe more.

Claude Gordon's "Systematic Approach..." is really well regarded but it's a sort of master book that oversees your work through, as noted above, a number of other books which you have to have.

Are lessons affordable for you? You might really benefit from a teacher ... heck I know I sure would, just can't afford one myself.
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dstdenis
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few suggestions:

1. Find a very good teacher who specializes in the type of music you want to play and get a lesson. Explain your goals and ask for his/her assessment of your skills. You will make better progress by working on a program to fix your specific weaknesses and maintain your strengths. One size doesn't fit all.

2. Find opportunities to play with others at about your level. Rehearsing with a band or combo is more difficult than practicing at home, and performing can be more revealing of your skills than either rehearsing with a band or practicing at home.

3. Careful about chasing strength and endurance as the top priority—this can lead to chronic fatigue. Better to place a higher priority on skills, musicality, and good ensemble playing. Your strength and stamina will come along as your skills and experience grows.

4. And be careful about working on material that's too difficult for you. Better to work on material that's within reach, listen carefully to your sound, and be a stickler for playing it really well.
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Craig Swartz
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, I think 40 minutes is way too long for a "warm up", especially if you are putting in 3 hours per day. Beyond your warm up, work on those things you don't do well at this point. Continuing to play those things you do well is primarily maintenance, and that's OK, too, if you are already where you want to be. Faster, slower, louder, softer, higher, lower. Good luck.
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EBjazz
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1jazzyalex wrote:
Rod Haney wrote:


I have his progressive warm up and use some of his stuff when I do my scale practice as he's really good about noting chords for all his stuff. This really helps me as I am an ear player.


Same here, lazy ol' ear player. I've been doing some busking and I'm no more likely to take sheet music than I am to bring along a pet llama.

Anything that helps my reading is good. I guess I should get that book.

BTW his name isn't blovin, it's Bolvinator.


Actually I've gone by Blovin in the past as well! I'm guessing I know you Alex?

Eb
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dcjway
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2017 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trombahonker wrote:
Merri Franquin's method, and read up on how many of the prominent players of the world have utilized it.



+1, I have found it easier to follow then Arban's, I believe he was a student of Arban.
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JazzFoodie
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smart Music by "makemusic" is really nice for getting a lot of sight reading material!
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7Trumpets
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm looking forward to retirement. Meanwhile, I aim for an hour a day.

I like Eric Bolvin's material, particularly jazz. Well thought out and quality production.

Also, I'm fresh out of Jamey Aebersold's Jazz Camp at Univ of Louisville and got tremendous help there. Many of the trumpet faculty are fans of Bill Adam or actually studied with him at IU. A few recommended Charley Davis' new book on the Adam method, which I should look into myself.

Meanwhile, you might check out Greg Wing's website. He is an Adam student and offers a 20-minute warm-up you can download for free.

You've already gotten a lot of astute advice, so I can't add much.

Thanks,

Barry
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