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Who is today's best female jazz trumpeter?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andrea Motis is another fabulous multi-instrumentalist and a trumpet player.
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SatchmoGillespie
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

spitvalve wrote:
Jami Dauber.


+1
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GeorgeB
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 3:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speed wrote:
I heard Bria Skonberg last week and was greatly impressed. I've only heard recordings of the others already mentioned. While I enjoy her recordings, they do not do justice to the way she played in person.

She is also a very capable vocalist.

Take care,
Marc Speed


Bria is really an exceptional jazz artist.
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Speed
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 4:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Bria Skonberg sells records with her vocals. When I saw her in concert with the Monterrey Jazz Festival on Tour, she sang a grand total of one song solo, and one part of a very interesting trio on another. Like Chris Botti, her trumpet playing live was much more interesting than on her recordings, to my ears at least.

She's generated good comments from performances at ITG events. I'd think that's a pretty tough audience for trumpet players.

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Marc Speed
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Tobylou8
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HERMOKIWI wrote:
So far there have been only five names mentioned:

Ingrid Jensen
Cindy Bradley
Shaye Cohn
Gunhild Carling
Bria Skonberg

That's not very many names. I'm not certain whether the lack of names is astonishing, tragic, embarrassing or something else. So I'm bumping the thread to see if any additional names turn up.

In the meantime I'll comment on the players suggested.

To me, there are two basic camps in improvisation based on individual preferences. The first camp consists of those who prefer what I call melodic improvisation. The second camp consists of those who prefer angular improvisation. Some players fit squarely within these definitions, that is, they are predominately melodic or predominantly angular. Some players are somewhere in between. Of course, there are other ways to subdivide improvisational types but for the purposes of this discussion I'm going to use the melodic v. angular comparison.

I've heard Ingrid Jensen live. She has a tremendous jazz vocabulary. I place her strongly in the angular category. I tend to favor melodic soloists but that doesn't diminish the fact that I recognize that Ingrid Jensen is extremely skilled in what she does.

I once sponsored Clay Jenkins (another very angular player) to come here. This was at the request of the jazz faculty. I'd never before heard of Clay. I listened to his recordings with a degree of mixed bewilderment/astonishment. Hearing him live was a much more fulfilling experience than listening to his recordings. Everything made a lot more sense in the live performance. Even though I lean to the more melodic I have to say that Clay was brilliant. It was difficult to imagine how he thought of what he played. He was an absolute wizard.

I feel similarly about Ingrid Jensen. What she does is a little too random and angular for my tastes but in terms of technical proficiency, imagination and execution she is, to me, at the top of the pyramid in terms of female artists performing contemporary jazz.

The biggest objection I have with Ingrid Jensen is her sound. She sounds a little tubby to me on the Monette. She was interviewed right after she started playing the Monette in which she commented that she felt the sound wasn't quite right and that she felt there was an adaptation period. I don't think her sound has changed, however.

I'd never heard of Cindy Bradley so I listened to her recordings. She is an extremely good player with a great sound. Her recordings are in the "techno" vein rather than straight jazz as we tend to think of straight jazz. However, she is very skilled technically and leans toward the melodic. Because I tend to prefer more melodic soloists I prefer listening to her compared to listening to Ingrid Jensen. However, I wish I could hear her on straight jazz without the "techno" influence. In the Wikipedia article about her she says that her primary influences have been Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan and Blue Mitchell. I don't hear Freddie in her playing at all. I do hear Lee and Blue. So, overall, I like her styling and sound more than I like Ingrid Jensen's style and sound. That being said, what Ingrid Jensen does would be a lot more difficult for me to do than what Cindy Bradley does. Overall, however, Cindy Bradley is wonderful.

I've heard of Shaye Cohn. She does not appear to have any recordings featuring her as the primary artist. What she does (traditional New Orleans jazz) she does very well. However, I don't feel she's in a class with either Ingrid Jensen or Cindy Bradley as a contemporary jazz artist.

Gunhild Carling is a force of nature. She is an astonishing multi-instrument jazz player and a well schooled jazz historian. However, she stays mostly with traditional New Orleans styling in her playing, she's more of an all around entertainer than a jazz trumpeter and he primary instrument is actually trombone. So, I can't put her in the same class as Ingrid Jensen or Cindy Bradley as a contemporary jazz artist. In some ways, however, Gunhild Carling is in a class by herself. I'm a big fan.

Finally, I'd never heard of Bria Skonberg so I listened to her recordings. She is, to me, a vocalist who plays trumpet. She plays with a lot of stylings similar to those used by Louis Armstrong so, to me, she is not a contemporary jazz artist in a class with Ingrid Jensen or Cindy Bradley.

So, that's my take on the 5 names so far. Anyone care to join in on these 5 and/or suggest other names?
I concur with your analysis on Cindy and Ingrid. "Tubby" is a good word to me for Ingrid and I too have listened to several recordings and technically, she's fine, but the sound was just not what I like. I liked Cindy before she broke out the pink Getzen. I find Cindy easier to listen too also.

Bria reminds me of a cover player. What she does is fine it's just playing the black to me. And most of the videos pulled up of her are her singing!.

Gunhild is just wild!! Plays, sings, and dances all in the same song!! She is a very entertaining player. First vid i ever saw of her was her playing 3 trumpets!


Kiku Collins has been around awhile and she came to my attention because she is/was a Getzen artist. She is really smoooooth jazz/smoooooth R&B. It's very easy listening. I've not heard anything with much more than a flip here and there "jazz-wise". Think Herb Albert's "Rise" and that's the gist of her playing. "Mr. Barista" is the most upbeat tune of her I've found.


Last edited by Tobylou8 on Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:11 am; edited 1 time in total
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HaveTrumpetWillTravel
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For workshops/ensemble Shaye Cohn really would be awesome. For students she is a "true musician," and one who doubles, leads, and has transitioned styles/instruments, and for community members she has developed a way of performing that has wide viewership. You've essentially said she focuses on a niche and isn't primarily a soloist, but who cares? What percent of gigging musicians do that?
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James Becker
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 8:38 am    Post subject: Re: Who is today's best female jazz trumpeter? Reply with quote

HERMOKIWI wrote:
I sponsor guest artists to give clinics and perform with the jazz orchestra at my local university. I have an interest in sponsoring a female jazz trumpeter. Who do think is the best female jazz trumpeter today and, equally as important, why do you think she is the best?


Every nomination so far demonstrates the diversity and range of accomplished female trumpet players in the field, making it hard to define who's "today's best".

I'd like to add Christine Fawson to the list. An amazing jazz musician, not only on trumpet and flugelhorn but a terrific vocalist in the tradition of Ella Fitzgerald. While attending Berklee School, Christine was a stand out member of Phil Wilson's All Star Rainbow Band, and went on to become a faculty member there for fourteen years. Her experience as a performer and educator make her uniquely qualified to present to your university students. I'm pretty confident your students will love her, and as you will discover is so down to earth.

https://www.christinefawson.com/about-christine/

https://www.abqjournal.com/1110315/ja-zzvirtuoso-makes-new-mexico-her-home.html

I hope this is helpful.
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rothman
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tenor is outside the instrument choice, but a gal in college like this shows that it could happen theoretically on the trumpet..

https://youtube.com/watch?v=G0ksxEyRtoA

https://www.julietaeugenio.com/
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Steve A
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not to cast blame on anyone on this list - it's cool finding new (to me) musicians I otherwise probably wouldn't have heard about, but I look forward to the day when we stop asking questions like this, because female jazz trumpeters (and other musicians of all kinds) are normal enough that there's no particular reason to single them out.
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Tobylou8
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:07 am    Post subject: Re: Who is today's best female jazz trumpeter? Reply with quote

James Becker wrote:
HERMOKIWI wrote:
I sponsor guest artists to give clinics and perform with the jazz orchestra at my local university. I have an interest in sponsoring a female jazz trumpeter. Who do think is the best female jazz trumpeter today and, equally as important, why do you think she is the best?


Every nomination so far demonstrates the diversity and range of accomplished female trumpet players in the field, making it hard to define who's "today's best".

I'd like to add Christine Fawson to the list. An amazing jazz musician, not only on trumpet and flugelhorn but a terrific vocalist in the tradition of Ella Fitzgerald. While attending Berklee School, Christine was a stand out member of Phil Wilson's All Star Rainbow Band, and went on to become a faculty member there for fourteen years. Her experience as a performer and educator make her uniquely qualified to present to your university students. I'm pretty confident your students will love her, and as you will discover is so down to earth.

https://www.christinefawson.com/about-christine/

https://www.abqjournal.com/1110315/ja-zzvirtuoso-makes-new-mexico-her-home.html

I hope this is helpful.
Very helpful and she's very good!
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plankowner110
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A fabulous young player to watch is Andrea Motis of Barcelona. She is a very talented trumpeter, saxophonist, and vocalist. There are many YouTube videos of her performing.
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BGinNJ
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't guess on "best", because there's probably plenty of great female players in practice rooms that don't get credit because they don't tour, etc.

That said, I've heard Bria Skonberg a couple of times, enjoy her playing. I think she's more in the traditional swing style.

I just heard Ingrid Jensen at Princeton, last time I heard her was with Maria Schneider's big band. Ingrid is a great player, chops, and a strong band leader, too. I didn't enjoy the material she did with the student band, though.

"Angular" is probably a good word, kind of "outside", too. I'm wondering if that kind of arranged, but avant-garde, non-swinging music is what is being taught in college music programs now, because I heard Ambrose Akinmusire with the same ensemble last year, and it was even harder to listen to- I couldn't make it through the set.
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BGinNJ wrote:
I wouldn't guess on "best", because there's probably plenty of great female players in practice rooms that don't get credit because they don't tour, etc.

That said, I've heard Bria Skonberg a couple of times, enjoy her playing. I think she's more in the traditional swing style.

I just heard Ingrid Jensen at Princeton, last time I heard her was with Maria Schneider's big band. Ingrid is a great player, chops, and a strong band leader, too. I didn't enjoy the material she did with the student band, though.

"Angular" is probably a good word, kind of "outside", too. I'm wondering if that kind of arranged, but avant-garde, non-swinging music is what is being taught in college music programs now, because I heard Ambrose Akinmusire with the same ensemble last year, and it was even harder to listen to- I couldn't make it through the set.


One more issue encountered while attending the performance of Ingrid Jensen was painful over-amplification, which was odd considering that the venue was not exactly full.
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Robert P
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HERMOKIWI wrote:
The biggest objection I have with Ingrid Jensen is her sound. She sounds a little tubby to me on the Monette.

Is this the Monette you're referring to or a different one? I'm aware of Ingrid, I don't follow her closely.

Dunno, sounds fine to me going by this recording. I thought that subdued, not so in-your-face timbre is what people like about Monettes.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Linda Briceno is a great musician in New York City. She plays trumpet, piano, sings, composes, and produces. She's originally from Venezuela so her roots are in Latin music, but she plays straight ahead jazz, too.

https://www.facebook.com/ellabricmusic/
https://www.facebook.com/lindaleeofficial
http://www.lindabriceno.com/
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=linda+briceno
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HaveTrumpetWillTravel
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heard Ingrid Jensen play at a college jazz festival last weekend and she was really good. She was working with students, I'm assuming undergrads and non-majors, and handled it with real grace (especially dealing with pedal issues and mic issues, which the sound tech should have had handled). It was a challenging environment and she kept everyone on track--a fun performance.
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Tobylou8
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robert P wrote:
HERMOKIWI wrote:
The biggest objection I have with Ingrid Jensen is her sound. She sounds a little tubby to me on the Monette.

Is this the Monette you're referring to or a different one? I'm aware of Ingrid, I don't follow her closely.

Dunno, sounds fine to me going by this recording. I thought that subdued, not so in-your-face timbre is what people like about Monettes.


Link


Got to be honest, I've never heard her play anything I wanted to hear again. Maybe it's the "avant garde" persona? I am glad she realizes that the Monette is a good horn! Some of the stuff that passes for playing jazz is what we did in junior high, rattling the valves and topping it off with a high note. But beauty is in the ear of the listener and maybe I missed my calling. A listener once commented to me that they loved my jazz. I thanked them and they went away happy. I grinned when they were gone, all I had done was rattle the valves and played a high note and sustained it. I was goofing off during a warm-up session. Oh what could have been! Maybe I'd have a Monette by now!
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HERMOKIWI wrote:
Don Herman rev2 wrote:
Some of them read TH FWIW.


Then they can speak for themselves. They don't need you. Right?


Snarky... Yes, that is right, nor you. It was meant as a reminder to folk that, when discussing fellow players, many read and/or are informed of posts on TH whether they are frequent (or infrequent) posters or not. You (not you specifically, a general "you") should consider posting as if the person is in front of you.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IMHO Ingrid plays her butt off. Granted, everyone's taste doesn't have to be the same and that's O.K. but I just offer this as another POV.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’m inclined to think that if someone has any issues with Ingrid Jensen, sound, angularity, melodic content etc, they really simple have issues with jazz in general. Saw her last year and she was fabulous. Melodically and sound especially. Plus she gets around the horn like few can, without losing any musicality. If anyone were to criticize what I saw on any level, I would have simply discarded what they say as coming from someone who does not understand jazz at any level.

She’s a top shelf jazz artist and everyone knows it.
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