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Question about Clarke #6



 
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comebackcornet
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Joined: 30 Jan 2017
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2019 11:46 am    Post subject: Question about Clarke #6 Reply with quote

So I'm working on Clarke #6 (assigned in SA lesson 9) and I am slowly working at getting to the minimum marked temp quarter=92.

My question is, as the range progresses it is difficult for me to stick the ending due to either lack of air and/or fatigue. I have read on this site (paraphrasing now) that Claude said to not try to play with less than half a tank of air, which I'm definitely low on air by the end of a 14 bar exercise.

So, should I not try to play it in one breath and "tank up" before the last arpeggio?

Thanks.
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ayryq
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2019 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm no expert but I've been going through this book as well.

I definitely wouldn't worry about making it through in one breath. I'd try to put a breath earlier, probably before the repeat of the scale. Breathing for just one bar might cause you to take a shallower breath because subconsciously you might feel you don't need as much air.

Also, I would not worry about breathing in time. Take a deep full breath when you need to and then resume. Make sure you crescendo that arpeggio - it's only marked on the first page but it's even more important as the range moves up - think of that last arpeggio as a brilliant flourish before the audience bursts into applause and you'll have the right idea
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solo soprano
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When playing music never let your air supply get below halfway (unless the music phrasing forces the issue). Keep the chest up. Blowing with a steady stream of air and keeping the chest up will contribute to your support. Think of the top half of your air as being your playing air, and the bottom half as your support air. If the air supply gets below halfway, you still have air, but no support. Always fill up every chance you get.
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illegalbugler
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2019 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try to get as far as possible in one breath and, over time, keep pushing to go further. Developing wind power is one aspect of the exercise. If you have to take a breath, do so at the bottom so you have air for going up.

If fatigue is an issue, please try to rest some more in between.
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comebackcornet
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

solo soprano wrote:
When playing music never let your air supply get below halfway (unless the music phrasing forces the issue). Keep the chest up. Blowing with a steady stream of air and keeping the chest up will contribute to your support. Think of the top half of your air as being your playing air, and the bottom half as your support air. If the air supply gets below halfway, you still have air, but no support. Always fill up every chance you get.


Thanks for the reply. It got me thinking about how I play in band, I routinely play until mostly empty in order to have a smoother line. Its also just easier a lot of times instead of having to try to fit in a breath. While I thought this was a good thing, perhaps this is self defeating.

However, as far as practice is concerned I just read a detailed article by Jeff Purtle (on purtle.com) where he reviews the original printed instructions from Clarke compared to the the revised printing that I have. He points out that in the original format Clarke specifically instructs that each exercise is to be played in one breath, and exercise 6 instructions restate these instructions ... food for thought ...
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Jeff_Purtle
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2019 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is why you need to go through the Clarke’s Technical Studies book multiple times. Each time covers another layer of things to gain from the book. For me it took maybe 3 years to do the Clarke Five etude in one breath and then shortly after the other one page etudes and three octave scales in clarke Nine fell into place. I had to go through and embouchure change and later realized the benefit of flexibility and how it helped my range and breath control. So many things are interconnected in a smart practice routine. If you don’t do part of a routine correctly or leave it off you will be lacking in other areas. I have seen it with students of my own and talked with Claude about it too. All aspects of playing are important.

Don’t get discouraged. Everything mentioned in that book is possible. Clarke’s metronome markings and breath control goals are way below what he could do and what most people can do with patience and Creech practice.

On rare occasions I have had students do the Clarke five etude in one breath after only spending a little over a year in Clarke. That is very unusual.

Keep you focus set on the long term goals and realize you will never have to play some of these things in public. It’s to make you play easier so the audience hears you make music and not struggle.

Enjoy the process.
Contact me if you wish.
Look for me at the ITG Conference in Miami this year.
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