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Post-retirement career as a trumpet jazz artist



 
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jsieverdes
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Joined: 14 Jan 2020
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:52 pm    Post subject: Post-retirement career as a trumpet jazz artist Reply with quote

I want to ask the community about part time schools (online or not) on a long term approach to become essentially a performance major. I have a non-music job right now that I'm not giving up, but play weekly (small combo). What are some suggestions on getting ready for a 2nd part time career in retirement to perform. I'm talking 20 years out before I retire but what will help me along the way to hit the ground running at mid-60's
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading cross-purposes in your post. Are you asking about private learning or university level accredited courses?
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vwag
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Joined: 17 Jul 2016
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Location: Denver, CO

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually would love to hear feedback on recommended courses, classes, or material for music theory for a non- music major. I do feel I’m missing much around theory to truly appreciate what I’m playing. I’m 5 years into a comeback looking to get a better foundation.
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HaveTrumpetWillTravel
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Joined: 30 Jan 2018
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Location: East Asia

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think for a lot of the comeback players this is kind of the dream, that over 10, 20, 30 years we'll log enough hours to be able to play semi-professionally. I recently watched Chase Sanborn's "10,000 hours" video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awfgrRHfKdE

He figures that it really took him that many practice hours to be able to play at a professional level, and he wasn't counting performances, gigs, theory classes, etc.

There seem to be a lot of new online programs designed to teach jazz improv and the like, but I don't know how closely one can approximate a music major experience without the college/university affiliation.

This is probably a downer for fellow comeback players, but I'm guessing that reaching professional level as a comeback player is very, very hard to do. I'm back a couple of years and feel like I've made progress on intonation and rhythm, transposing, and some basic theory, but it's very different from soaking in music 12 hours/day for 4-8 years in your teens and early twenties.
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OldHorn
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This premise IMO will be very hard to do. You can find private instructors to help you, and after 20 years study, I might be wrong, but I suspect you'll want to perform at a professional level. It's been my experience that most of the playing opportunities that come our way, are a result of networking and friendships made in school with out musicians.

You won't have this networking to build on. Being honest, you're just gonna be the old guy (like me), where professional playing opportunities are limited. My advice is to enjoy music and playing, and take it where it leads. Enjoy the ride.
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Croquethed
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe move to a place you can busk in retirement.
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epoustoufle
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually think it would be pretty stressful being a professional trumpet player. Phone call, 1 rehearsal, then a gig with people you don't know. Maybe they expect a lot from 1 trumpet player, maybe you're supposed to be "fun", maybe nobody even talks to you. I did a few like that.
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Turkle
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Joined: 29 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think you're going to find a school or official program that's going to do what you want.

I'd suggest finding the baddest trumpet player in town and taking private lessons for a long time. Hit the jam sessions and network.

The problem with your concept, ultimately, is that there are more jazz education programs in this country than there are jazz clubs where the music can be heard. You see the difficulty here. There aren't careers in this music for anyone, let alone graduates of school programs.

Your only hope is to learn the music and aggressively network for the next 20 years.

Good luck!
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There might be a difference between being a full-time professional trumpet player and being a trumpet player who plays professionally.

If you have a retirement income, then how often and for how much you play are not as crucial s if your income depended on it. And face it, there are a lot of playing opportunities (depending on where you live) that you can play for money and who's expectations and playing standard are not as high, but rewarding, both emotionally and financially.

To that end, the latter, there are community colleges where you can find excellent staff which is very affordable. There are online/Skype private lessons available where you can study with first-class players, like John Mohan here. It'll cost you, but Berklee College of Music has a series of online courses that are worth looking into. Check out their web site.

There are some good recommendations here but keep in mind that, "You can only do what you can do". That's not an excuse for mediocrity but a suggestion to do your best but also to feel rewarded in that, no matter where it leads and not to feel frustrated or beat yourself up.

BTW, although you need good chops to do both, don't confuse the suggestions that might be assuming you will be playing top level ensemble work with playing gigs in a combo. Different emphasis.

Also, how viable your possibility of making a good income is and how many clubs are available depend on where you live.
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Last edited by kehaulani on Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:45 pm; edited 2 times in total
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John Mohan
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your goal is to teach trumpet, perhaps as a professor at a college, then you should pursue a formal education and eventually get at least a Masters Degree in music education, or perhaps a BA in trumpet performance with a Masters in music education (or the other way around).

If your goal is to become a good enough trumpet player to earn money playing in top level professional situations, then you should seek private lessons, either in person or via Skype with a top level trumpet teacher who spent most of his or her career as a successful professional trumpet player.

I am one of those trumpet teachers, and there are others like me. I have had several students come to me with the goal of playing trumpet for a living or partial living upon retirement from their current careers. Several are participants of this website and all have been successful in achieving their goals.

Best wishes,

John Mohan
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Jaw04
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Instead of enrolling in classes or going back to college I would recommend just work on playing a lot. As many jam sessions as possible, join a community band or orchestra, try to hustle up some gigs in your local music scene. Network, make friends, jam, etc.
Take lessons from someone who you look up to and you can "fill in the blanks" that you speak of in your education that way.
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