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Jerry's Latest Tongue Tip Anchor


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Dave Converse
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Joined: 04 Jan 2003
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Location: Nashville, Tn.

PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2020 8:02 am    Post subject: Re: Jerry's Latest Tongue Tip Anchor Reply with quote

trumpetplanet wrote:



I don't know what other people would tell you these days about the specific thing you mention here but if you read the instructions that are on the DVD there is no mention of the "Ice Cream Lick". I found a thread once that said that Jerry didn't stick with that exact set-up for very long and there is little-to-no talk about it in the decade since the DVD was released.

There has been a fair amount of discussion about the precise tongue position that you should strive for and that is something that varies from person to person, which is why it was always good to contact Jerome when he was alive. He could have told you want you were doing and how to improve it. Having said that, the general tongue position is not complicated and generally speaking, over time, Jerome would always lead you back to that simple image associated with Secret 1 in the Trumpet Secrets book.
A couple of months back I posted a video on the Callet MSC Facebook group about teaching the Spit Buzz and it has had a lot of positive feedback. You may find it helpful.

Although a lot of emphasis is put on the tongue position you will not have the full benefit if your lips have a tendency to tighten and if the jaw closes as you ascend. When ascending a scale you may notice a pitch where the sound becomes less free and the you need to apply more effort to continue. This is the best sign that something has changed in your playing. It can often be observed too if you were to watch in a mirror or make a short film of yourself playing.

Remember: If it isn't easy, it's probably not right! Trust me when I say that you don't need the strength to lift a 32KG kettlebell in order to play a DHC as some would have you believe...

Of course the other kiss of death is overblowing. It's easy to get the tongue in place and still use too much air or to blow too hard. The result would be the collapse of the chops into the cup, or the initiation of any of the habits mentioned the previous paragraph.
Despite me being a proponent of TCE, I have had a bunch of people contact me to say that they've played their easiest high notes after applying the older "Legacy" Superchops ideas that I have written about on my blog. This isn't because TCE isn't working, it's because we don't allow TCE to work if everything else is wrong.

Kyle wrote a great post nearly 20 years ago about the different stages of TCE development loosely following the various eras of Jerome's books/teaching. It's well worth digging it up.


Thanks. I'll check FB. I think I originally missed that the DVD was from earlier in Jerry's research. As I said, though, SC, TCE, or Trumpet Secrets ever jelled to make my endurance or range better. It HAS greatly improved my articulation due to the forward tongue, tip always anchored to back of bottom lip.

Anything Kyle wrote 20 years ago, is probably printed in my Callet folder, as I really value his views. Looks like I'll be digging out my old stuff.
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mike ansberry
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Joined: 03 Jun 2003
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2020 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Last edited by mike ansberry on Tue Sep 01, 2020 6:33 am; edited 1 time in total
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tptguy
Jerome Callet Forum Moderator


Joined: 11 Nov 2001
Posts: 3366
Location: Philadelphia, Pa

PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

<<the general tongue position is not complicated and generally speaking, over time, Jerome would always lead you back to that simple image associated with Secret 1 in the Trumpet Secrets book.>>

I read this thread a few days ago. First thing I did before posting was pull out Jerry's book, "Trumpet Secrets" in order to confirm that my reference was to the correct picture in my memory. Basically, my post was going to say that for tongue position, "It's all there in Secrets #1". I enjoyed seeing TrumpetPlanet beat me to it. He said almost exactly what I wanted to say. As most of us know, Jerry experimented every day. But in all my years with him, he always came back to Secrets #1 as the base, the foundation from which everything grows.

I'd like to expand on two terms. First "everything grows". Most all of us think that you when put your tongue in Jerry's position then "it just happens!". And when it doesn't just happen you try another position. But the reality is this, you get the tongue in the right position in order to start to grow. And with this position, trumpet playing gets better nearly every session. Not that you gain a whole step in range every session. Rather, your trumpet playing requires less effort plus gets demonstrably better (by ear) and nearly every session. Conversely, you can play your brains out, blow your brains out, press your brains out - and things get marginally better, if at all. And the sound continues to be pinched, flat, dull, overblown, and out-of-tune.

The second term I'd like to discuss is "anchor". I think it's both correct and dangerous. The tip of the tongue sits lightly on the top of the lower lip. And, it never, ever leaves that spot. Therefore, it is correctly described as "anchored". However, many of us picture anchored as "solid as a rock", "stiff", "rigid", "unrelenting". These views are wrong and self defeating, so be wary of this danger.

In TCE, the tip of the tongue never moves back. It never loses contact with the top of the lower lip. However, it must also stay supple and loose. To me, it feels "firm", but not stiff. Never horizontally stiff. Otherwise, it can't arch.

Best wishes to everyone, Kyle :>)
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tptguy
Jerome Callet Forum Moderator


Joined: 11 Nov 2001
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ice cream lick = the initial step for best setup of the tongue, face, teeth, and both lips. If you ever got the chance to watch Jerry setup for a double high C entrance then you saw the ice cream lick in full action. His tongue lick pulled both lips in with mega grips against the firm yet arched tongue. Gap between upper and lower teeth was gauged precisely simply by the tongue. Muscles below the eyes pushed the upper lip very firmly against the top of the tongue.

From there, Jerry thought of just two things: 1) don't lose that grip 2)blow only a very small thread of air. Then, voila! For the rest of us, cover our ears, LOL

Best, Kyle
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tptguy
Jerome Callet Forum Moderator


Joined: 11 Nov 2001
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Location: Philadelphia, Pa

PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oops! Let me come back to my post in which I suggested that the tongue needs to stay supple enough to arch. "Arch" is a term quite like "anchor" in that both terms are used almost across the board in brass pedagogy, yet mean several decidedly different things. I don't want anyone to think I'm using arch as in the mid-20th century manner of say a Claude Gordon teacher. This type of tongue arch is typically described as an ahh-eee arching against the roof of the month. Instead, I am referring to the TCE use of the tongue as in a continuous "wedge" against the upper lip and upper teeth. Very important, no whistling, no ahh-eee.

How to tell the difference? In the whistling approach the tip of the tongue pulls back when the top of the tongue arches up. In other words, as the tongue curves then the tongue shortens. In order to maintain semblance of pitch, air power needs to increase. So the sound gets blatty. And the pitch falls flat and loosens its vibrancy, it's brilliance. This is where the ears come in. Follow the ears to the centered, brilliant, rich, in focus, and never overblown pitch to find the best track.

Best to all, Kyle
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terrys17
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2020 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for responding kyle -just like the old days! Good hearing from you
Terry
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edtaylor
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Joined: 23 Dec 2001
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 06, 2021 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am trying to get some semblance of chops back. I was never much of a player just mostly for my own amusement I was an honor guard bugler for 17 years Which brings me to the point of working on my chops. A dear friend who used to head our honor guard is approaching 92 yrs and has asked me to sound Taps as his ashes are scattered to the winds.

I am following the tongue comments on this and other threads and I still have notes from goldenhornplayer's sessions with Jerry years ago. It's fun to play a bit again after several years of being caught up in other things. I have progressed to C above the staff so far and will be combing these threads for tips. THanks to all who ask and answer questions on these threads.
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