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Bill Adam's Warm Up Routine


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Xenoman
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2002 11:10 am    Post subject: Bill Adam's Warm Up Routine Reply with quote

I use the Bill Adam method as part of my daily study but I don't really do any type of warm up. I always start with long tones and then will either work on the lip slurs or chromatic stuff.

Is this ok? Should I incorporate some sort of warmup routine before moving to my daily studies?

<font size=-2>[ This Message was edited by: Xenoman on 2004-02-10 12:10 ]</font>
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NCTrumpet
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2002 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure that there are others who could provide more in-depth information on this topic, but here are my experiences.

Adam's method has never been touted as a "warm-up" at all, but a series of exercises to get "in phase" with the instrument. Remember, the trumpet is static; meaning IT doesn't change. The player must orient himself to the instrument using ample air supply and control, and a great deal of concentration.

I always begin just about any session blowing through the leadpipe, or venturi tube, allowing my chops to buzz sympathetically with the tube. I do this with a full sound for about 3-4 minutes.

The long tones (expanding tones), chromatics (Clark), slurs, 'flow' studies, articulation exercises, etc. are all I need to be ready for any trumpet task. The process takes maybe 40 minutes. Be cautious to not rush any part of the exercise. Much emphasis should be placed on thought, concentration, and playing the sound concepts in your mind. With careful application, you can get in the "zone" as often as you want. This is where playing the horn becomes more like an idea/thought than a physical task.

Lastly, any player must have a system he can believe in. This one quickly convinced me. But get with an Adam desciple (sp). Just playing the Adam studies won't give you the best understanding as to how they should be played. And don't overlook the part about concentration.

I'm sure I forgot a bunch of stuff.

JC!
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Yoinks
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2002 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I use it as a warm-up, but it doens't have to be that. The routine itself is not anything that special. Except for the long tones, which have been around obviously a lot longer than Mr. Adam, everthing else is also a compilation from other sources. It is the THINKING behind the routine that Mr. Adam teaches that make it significant. Get with an Adam disciple as NCT says. I have tried a couple of times on this website to explain some of the philosophies, but it is really, really hard to do correctly, and I worry I may just cause more harm than good. Even people like Mr. Harbison who have studied with Mr. Adam for a long, long time, choose their words very carefully when trying to explain a concept in written words that belongs in the realm of sound.
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PH
Bill Adam/Carmine Caruso Forum Moderator


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2002 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well said so far, folks! I can only add, not disagree.

You might hear a lot of talk about the "Adam Routine". You can even find some versions of that routine posted on some various websites. I'll tell you a little secret. There really isn't an "Adam Routine".

I have studied with Mr. Adam on and off since the early 1970s and in that time I know of at least 4 different versions of "The Routine" that he has used.

There are certain principles which most all Adam students subscribe to. These include both the way you approach your playing and the way you organize your practice. I will give you my perceptions of these things. I can't speak for Mr. Adam or his other students.

1) The routine isn't a warm-up. It is something you do every day in order to elevate your playing.
2) We want to do the same things every day, particularly in the first portion of the playing day. Your body and mind are in a constant state of change. A routine gives you a touchstone which pulls you into "the zone". If you know anything about neuro-linguistic programming you will know what I mean.
3) This isn't a warm-up as much as it is a pre-game ritual. Athletes use such rituals to prepare both their mind and body for the game.
4) When the mind is ready the body follows.
5) Virtually all Adam students from the mid-70s on use the leadpipe exercise to begin the playing session. This gets the breath flowing, the chops set and warmed up, and puts the mind in a relaxed and focused state.
6) If I do a couple of minutes of playing on the leadpipe, 3 or 4 long tones, and 1 or 2 scales or a Clarke study I'm warmed up. After that I'm practicing/playing.

In my next installment I'll talk about the structure of a good routine.
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Xenoman
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2002 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is great stuff guys. Keep it coming. It makes sense to me.
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Emb_Enh
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2002 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Golly! --I used to warm up for approx. 25 mins before I felt ''in the zone'' as PH put it.

Thankfully I've got that down to between
5 to 7 minutes....which is basically ''air scales''
with a little articulation thrown in at random.

I just don't need extended stuff these days at all before being ready. Lots of my students just never seem to finish warming up...it's almost impossible to tell where the warm up finishes and the playing/performing begins.

Like Mr.PH above -- as long as what you do gets you to the point efficiently, I fail to see the need to cover ALL bases when Warming up. I just don't need to ''get the tongue'' going etc..

I do believe 2 things however....

1. You can easily wreck a performance if you get it wrong....I've seen famous names do this.

2. It's important to have a structure to whatever you do for you, as just foolin' around won't help your mind/chops. One needs to be able to know that a particular performance was a bad one not because of your warm but because you forgot your lucky Tie!! (I might make that a thread!)

Roddy o-iii<O
_________________
Regards, Roddy o-iii RoddyTpt@aol.com

"E M B O U C H U R E___E N H A N C E M E N T"
BOOK 1 also... BOOK 2 + demo CD


[Self Analysis and Diagnostic Trumpet Method]
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PH
Bill Adam/Carmine Caruso Forum Moderator


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2002 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Minor clarification:

Any good player (and definitely any pro) needs to be able to play well (to be "warmed up") 5 minutes after they get out of the car and hit the stage or the studio. However, the deeper I get into my playing day (and the more of my daily routine I work through) the better I will play.

In other words, if I can warm up for 5 minutes I can pretty much play whatever I need to and sound good and not hurt myself. If I can follow that up with another hour or two of practice I will be so much more physically attuned to the instrument and mentally relxed and focused that my playing will improve markedly. If I practice the proper way for 2 hours before a gig I will have more endurance and play better on the last set than if I only have time for a 5 minute warm-up.

If this is not true you probably are doing the wrong kind of practice routine.

However, reality dictates that you can't be addicted to a long and deliberate practice session masquerading as a warm-up.
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PH
Bill Adam/Carmine Caruso Forum Moderator


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2002 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some guiding principles behind the Adam routine:

1. The imagination is the driving force behind music making. Hearing the desired result vividly in your imagination will activate whatever physical activity it takes to make that sound.

2. Every day and every repetition causes a more dependable result. Inconsistency eventually vanishes as the body makes a habit out of the most efficient way it finds to get the imagined result.

3. Most physical problems are air problems. When the air and the imagination are working, the embouchure, tongue, etc. can settle into balance. If the air never flows steadily the rest of your system will also be in a constant state of adjustment and compensation.

4. Physical and psychological tension are the trumpeter's greatest foes.

5. A trumpet player needs to be involved with every note they play in an energetic way-both physically and mentally. It takes a lot of energy to play well. It shouldn't take a lot of force. If it does you are fighting against yourself and/or the instrument.

6. We don't want our body to fight the physics and acoustics of the trumpet. Those natural laws don't change. Therefore, we have to change our approach.

7. Unnecessary tension comes when the body is working against itself. Isometric tension is created by opposing muscle groups which are at war.

8. Start the day by playing on the leadpipe/mouthpiece combination. Use plenty of air and try to get the most steady and resonant sound you can. On most Bb trumpets the concert Eb is the natural resonant pitch of the leadpipe.

9. After you have set up the air flow and warmed up the embouchure (without creating undue embouchure tension), transfer that approach to the trumpet.

10. Start with long tones or slowly moving flow studies with smaller intervals. Every single thing you play all day is a tone study!

11. Establish a relaxed but energized airflow and a rich, resonant tone on every note from the very first note.

12. Start in the middle register and gradually expand up and down alternating higher/lower/higher/lower, etc.

13. Carry the beauty of sound and the free flow of energized breath into all the other contexts: expand register, expand dynamics, go through all the various articulations, lyrical playing, etc.

14. At all times remember to imagine a beautiful sound. Keep your attention on that sound. Keep your energy up but never tense. Move that energized air through your sound. Stay calm and mentally focused...never anxious.

15. Never get angry with yourself and never try to go so fast that anxiety is created. If you do those things you are actually practicing being anxious and upset when playing. Of course that is how you will feel emotionally when you play if that is how you have practiced. Relax. It is supposed to be fun. We don't work music. We play music.

<font size=-2>[ This Message was edited by: PH on 2002-02-07 17:16 ]</font>


Last edited by PH on Sat Oct 18, 2008 12:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
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NCTrumpet
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2002 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Pat.

It's nice to read about Adam's teaching in such concise language. I'm going to print your post and hang it on my refrigerator!

Since beginning with the Adam method, I've described to my students and other players that the brain/mind will allow the body to become efficient. The less one analyzes and the more one 'sings' through the horn, the less opportunity for strange thoughts to creep into the mind. Concentration always has been and still is the hardest thing I've had to tackle, but the Adam method (as shown to me by an Adam student) is helping me conquer the demon(s).

I will continue to enjoy reading your ideas about playing.

JC.
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pair of kings
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2002 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forgive my ignorance - this business of warming up on the lead pipe??? When someone hires me to play my leadpipe maybe I will try practicing that way. Even all the mouthpiece buzzing routines I don't really buy into. I have always been able to buzz tunes with just my lips but when it is practice time I want to practice my trumpet.
Also somewhere I lost that dependancy on a warm up. It is a good thing and I certainly do when possible - but it isn't always possible in real life. Unless I have really abused my chops in previous days, I usually don't feel that need to 'warm -up' before I play. Am I alone - or wrong?
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PH
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2002 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't NEED to warm up and I don't even NEED to practice. Practicing shows a lack of self confidence!

I like to practice, though.

As for the leadpipe, playing it for a minute or two before going to the instrument helps most people get things settled down and going in the right direction in the morning and is a lot more like playing (and therefore more beneficial) than buzzing the mouthpiece or buzzing the lips is.

See my first post in this thread re: warm-up.
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pair of kings
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2002 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes I did see your first post there on the warm-up. And do agree with that. My question remains: if the leadpipe is better than the mouthpiece to get things going, then why isn't the horn going to work better than playing just the leadpipe. I can't make sense of it.
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NCTrumpet
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2002 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My view about leadpipe buzzing is that is that it creates the natural sympathetic buzz that will be necessary in playing the horn. Buzzing the lips by themselves or even with a mouthpiece just isn't characteristic of what actually happens with the horn.

In my experience, leadpipe buzzing also allows the player to immediately know if he is playing with a 'full' sound. The tube won't let you get away with playing with unsupported air. The pitch (f) will be incorrect. In addition, less resistance causes the player to use a lot of air creating large sound and thus a more confident approach to playing.

But this is analyzing it waaaay to deply. It only take two minutes.

JC.
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trptsbaker
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2002 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Somebody showed me the lead -pipe warm up years ago, and it has never failed me. I guess it's an Adam's thing, don't know, never met the guy. For Bb trumpet, F (first space) in the staff, G on top of the staff, high D, high G, double-C, continue. These are the natural overtones of a standard Bb trumpet lead-pipe. Double tongue, all dynamics, etc., for a couple of minutes and you are good to go. That is the warm-up, straighten ya right out. Playing jazz licks for an hour before a gig is not a warm-up. Save your chops for the performance. T.
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Yoinks
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2002 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, and the leadpipe, for me, is a lot less forgiving. It ia a lot easier to tell that my sound and air are off center if I play that first. I think you would be surprised if you heard some advanced Adam students play the leadpipe, and what it sounds like.
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PH
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2002 4:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The advantage of the leadpipe over moving directly to the trumpet (in my mind) is that you can get the air and the chops ready to go without having to deal with quite as much resistance. It makes it a bit gentler when things are "waking up".

Last edited by PH on Tue Aug 14, 2007 4:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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trptsbaker
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2002 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right. It feels like "training wheels" for your chops. Centers everything. You can actually make the lead pipe sound like a picc. A nice, loud, fat picc. Maybe I should take a lesson w/Mr. Adams and find out if I am doing this correctly. T.
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Cozy
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2002 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

On 2002-02-08 23:24, PH wrote:As for the leadpipe, playing it for a minute or two before going to the instrument helps most people get things settled down and going in the right direction in the morning and is a lot more like playing (and therefore more beneficial) than buzzing the mouthpiece or buzzing the lips is.

Years ago, I did not play the leadpipe much. The past few years have made a believer out of me. It truly is an excellent way to focus, to visualize and use concentrated breathing. Yes, it's a warmup in a way, but it sure gets the day started right. Thanks to PH et al. for the excellent posts!

Cozy
http://www.cozychops.com
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4Him
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2002 6:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should never read these threads at work! How am I gonna be productive now when I feel like I need to go home use the stuff I am learning here! Somebody, quick, get me a leadpipe!

Anyway, PH, this is a great post and very helpful. Question: As an avid reader of the forum and less frequent poster, it seems to me that Chicago and Adam are close cousins. Are the two schools completely complimentary, or are there conflicting thoughts?

Ken

Quote:

On 2002-02-07 17:13, PH wrote:
Some guiding principles behind the Adam routine:

1. The imagination is the driving force behind music making. Hearing the desired result vividly in your imagination will activate whatever physical activity it takes to make that sound.

2. Every day and every repetition causes a more dependable result. Inconsistency eventually vanishes as the body makes a habit out of the most efficient way if finds to get the imagined result.

3. Most physical problems are air problems. When the air and the imagination are working, the embouchure, tongue, etc. can settle into balance. If the air never flows steadily the rest of your system will also be in a constant state of adjustment and compensation.

4. Physical and psychological tension are the trumpeter's greatest foes.

5. A trumpet player needs to be involved with every note they play in an energetic way-both physically and mentally. It takes a lot of energy to play well. It shouldn't take a lot of force. If it does you are fighting against yourself and/or the instrument.

6. We don't want our body to fight the physics and acoustics of the trumpet. Those natural laws don't change. Therefore, we have to change our approach.

7. Unnecessary tension comes when the body is working against itself. Isometric tension is created by opposing muscle groups which are at war.

8. Start the day by playing on the leadpipe/mouthpiece combination. Use plenty of air and try to get the most steady and resonant sound you can. On most Bb trumpets the concert Eb is the natural resonant pitch of the leadpipe.

9. After you have set up the air flow and warmed up the embouchure (without creating undue embouchure tension), transfer that approach to the trumpet.

10. Start with long tones or slowly moving flow studies with smaller intervals. Every single thing you play all day is a tone study!

11. Establish a relaxed but energized airflow and a rich, resonant tone on every note from the very first note.

12. Start in the middle register and gradually expand up and down alternating higher/lower/higher/lower, etc.

13. Carry the beauty of sound and the free flow of energized breath into all the other contexts: expand register, expand dynamics, go through all the various articulations, lyrical playing, etc.

14. At all times remember to imagine a beautiful sound. Keep your attention on that sound. Keep your energy up but never tense. Move that energized air through your sound. Stay calm and mentally focused...never anxious.

15. Never get angry with yourself and never try to go so fast that anxiety is created. If you do those things you are actually practicing being anxious and upset when playing. Of course that is how you will feel emotionally when you play if that is how you have practiced. Relax. It is supposed to be fun. We don't work music. We play music.

[ This Message was edited by: PH on 2002-02-07 17:16 ]


[ This Message was edited by: 4Him on 2002-06-17 09:16 ]

[ This Message was edited by: 4him on 2002-06-18 05:35 ]
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trumpity
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2002 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't forget about keeping the sound out found. I believe that was a major concept Mr Adam stressed to me and others...what a awesome site..finally thre is a site dealing with Mr Adam's concepts...I've been doing the routine now for 22 years, and I finally found some insight into Mr Adam's teachings from his student's perspective!! Awesome...PH is batting 1000 here! Mr Adam never explained the physical, he felt the sensory input of one sense, i.e. earing, was the focus point..that is mental earring of one's desired sound for that desired style of music.

Thanks PH
Kim Petersen
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