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Bill Adam's Warm Up Routine


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PH
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2004 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

On 2004-03-02 14:46, GAL wrote:

...Was that something that Mr. Adam said to you in a lesson about how you should be keeping your sound out front? I'm concentrating on my sound, but this is still new to me.

I feel by focusing on my sound and thinking (imagining) the sound "way out front", I'll get to the desired results that I'm looking for...

The sound is kept out front through a combination of mental imagery and the flowing air. The thing Billy said about imagining the sound "sung" from behind the eyes is crucial. At one point Adam had me imagine that I was actually blowing my air through the bridge of my nose and over the top of the trumpet. (Of course, like much of his teaching, this is visualization and not what actually happens!) This is not unlike the singer's concept of "head voice" versus (or actually blended ala Bel Canto with) "chest voice".

Some other concepts that help me are:

Imagine that the sound starts at the bell and radiates through the room rather than imagining that the sound starts at the lips and is moved through the trumpet. Imagine that everything behind the bell is static when playing a long tone.

Hear the sound imagined as beginning out in the room.

Blow through the trumpet, not into it.

Imagine that all articulation happens at the front of your mouth. Don't think about the mechanics. Simply "pronounce" the syllables in the front of your mouth. To use another singer analogy, this is like pronouncing "in the mask".

The flowing air is the motive force that keeps the sound production out front and keeps the pronunciation to the front.

More to come as I remember them. These little pearls were rarely given in a great lecture. They were sprinkled (intentionally offhandedly) throughout our conversations and only revealed their significance later when they were recalled at the appropriate time when I was practicing.
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Billy B
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2004 6:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another point just came to mind. My friends who study voice say the Bel Canto teachers call that "up front" voice a "big" voice and the rest is a "small" voice. Also imagine that free and present sound of a baby wailing. So much sound from such a small package! And they never wear out or get hoarse.
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shofar
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2004 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

On 2004-03-03 07:58, PH wrote:

...These little pearls were rarely given in a great lecture. They were sprinkled (intentionally offhandedly) throughout our conversations and only revealed their significance later when they were recalled at the appropriate time when I was practicing....


Those are great statements. My teacher (not an Adams disciple) used to have me do certain things. I would then ask why or how that works and he would say "you'll kknow when it happens. It always did, and then we would talk about it later. Interesting how that works.
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Xenoman
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2004 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nonsense Eliminator wrote:
Fools rush in...

I actually asked Mr. Adam about this point-blank. Unfortunately, I can't recall his answer exactly, because it simply confirmed my impressions about what he meant. It is very difficult to verbalize, but I'll give it a shot and hopefully Pat can refine my demented ramblings...

Sometimes we tend to play the trumpet with a sound that is "dark" (diffuse) and "round" (dull) and "warm" (limp) and doesn't go past the end of the bell. (In case that was too subtle, I don't care for that kind of sound.) When I catch myself generating that kind of sound, it feels as if the sound is in my mouth or throat -- obviously, that's completely psychological, but I think many people can relate to that sensation. That is the kind of sound that would provoke Mr. Adam to say, "Way out front, now!" On the other hand, when I am making a sound that is vibrant and energized and exciting, it seems to start somewhere past the end of the bell and keep going.

It's not about blowing harder or playing louder, but somehow thinking of playing with the sound "way out front" encourages me to get the sound out of the trumpet and into the room where it can do some good. Again, this is strictly a mental image and not a physical one, but playing "way out front" seems to involve blowing through the trumpet (or through the sound) rather than into it.

Hope that makes at least some sense!


I'm sitting here eating lunch and I stumbled upon this thread. I can think of many times when my sound is as NE describes above. Is there anything I can do to combat this other than playing loud (my current solution)?

Perhaps this is a separate issue but I play with a small combo and I have found that the saxophones are always louder than me (Alto and Tenor). Either that or I can't hear myself that well... (bass & guitar are electric). I could just play louder but that probably wouldn't be the smartest thing to do if I'm performing in a 2 hour concert. If my sound were more resonant (not bright), perhaps it wouldn't be an issue...
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PH
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2004 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The mental picture you want is that the sound is made at the front of your mouth and beyond. The sound is made out in front of your face and the mental energy and the energy of the breath moves through that point and projects the sound into the room. The moving breath turns on the sound in the trumpet.

Imagine the sound of every note and phrase happening out in front of your face. The body simply falls in line with the sound coming from the instrument.

I imagine the sound starting at the bell and the breath also starting to move out from there. When I articulate I say the syllable of the sound at the front of my mouth. The flowing breath keeps everything to the front. Practice singing what you are going to play with your vocal pronunciation to the front of your mouth.

This will definitely be easier at first to accomplish if you play on the loud side of mezzo-forte. Eventually you can play through the sound at all volumes.

Remember, this is a mental concept and a picture that will produce the desired result. The actual way your body works will be an incidental response to that picture.
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msmith229
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:34 am    Post subject: Adam Reply with quote

Thank you for the GREAT Posts PH. I studied with bob sullivan at manhattan school and we did lead pipe buzzing too, although he never attributed it to Adam, their concepts seem to line up pretty well. Your posts inspire me and I am sure other PH...keep em coming!
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Xenoman
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PH wrote:
The mental picture you want is that the sound is made at the front of your mouth and beyond. The sound is made out in front of your face and the mental energy and the energy of the breath moves through that point and projects the sound into the room. The moving breath turns on the sound in the trumpet.

Imagine the sound of every note and phrase happening out in front of your face. The body simply falls in line with the sound coming from the instrument.

I imagine the sound starting at the bell and the breath also starting to move out from there. When I articulate I say the syllable of the sound at the front of my mouth. The flowing breath keeps everything to the front. Practice singing what you are going to play with your vocal pronunciation to the front of your mouth.

This will definitely be easier at first to accomplish if you play on the loud side of mezzo-forte. Eventually you can play through the sound at all volumes.

Remember, this is a mental concept and a picture that will produce the desired result. The actual way your body works will be an incidental response to that picture.


This is an excellent post that I revisited today before practice. My long tones have never sounded better. Sound in FRONT of the horn....
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reversedlead
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 5:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Bill Adam's Warm Up Routine Reply with quote

Xenoman wrote:
I use the Bill Adam method as part of my daily study but I don't really do any type of warm up. I always start with long tones and then will either work on the lip slurs or chromatic stuff.

Is this ok? Should I incorporate some sort of warmup routine before moving to my daily studies?
[ This Message was edited by: Xenoman on 2004-02-10 12:10 ]</font>


I view playing the leadpipe as my warm up. But if you play FULL routine, that is what makes you play better, every day.

I say FULL routine, because you must do ALL the exercises, in order, and not rush. You must do Long Tones, Clarke 1, then Schlossberg. If your not rushing (rest as much as you play etc etc)... this should take two hours... no joke. But if you do it everyday (it will be a blow for a while) your endurance will increase and you will play better. I don't believe "skipping" parts of routine is a good idea. Routine is laying a foundation for your playing to stand on... if you don't pour part of it... your house may fall down.

Brandon
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textr
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PH wrote:
Minor clarification:

Any good player (and definitely any pro) needs to be able to play well (to be "warmed up") 5 minutes after they get out of the car and hit the stage or the studio. However, the deeper I get into my playing day (and the more of my daily routine I work through) the better I will play.

In other words, if I can warm up for 5 minutes I can pretty much play whatever I need to and sound good and not hurt myself. If I can follow that up with another hour or two of practice I will be so much more physically attuned to the instrument and mentally relxed and focused that my playing will improve markedly. If I practice the proper way for 2 hours before a gig I will have more endurance and play better on the last set than if I only have time for a 5 minute warm-up.

If this is not true you probably are doing the wrong kind of practice routine.

However, reality dictates that you can't be addicted to a long and deliberate practice session masquerading as a warm-up.



Well put PH, it is amazing how you can really get more relaxed and in to the real joy of playing the horn and the music wih a couple of hours of concentrated but relaxed PRACTICE.
I have experienced the same thing and those are the times when my chops really felt good on the last set, or even after the job.
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dorganu36
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is great stuff guys. Keep it coming. It makes sense to me.
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theRiddler
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 8:14 am    Post subject: Whew.... Reply with quote

Quote:
Imagine that all articulation happens at the front of your mouth. Don't think about the mechanics. Simply "pronounce" the syllables in the front of your mouth. To use another singer analogy, this is like pronouncing "in the mask".


I was explaining this to a buddy of mine last year... the topic of discussion came up later around some other IU folks/Adam students, and I believe I was the only amongst us who had heard the "mask" analogy. I was starting to feel I had imagined it... I love how certain Adam-isms are given to you as you need them... Jedi Training, it is. Much to learn still, have I.

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someguy6
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is the "goal" to Schlossberg #6 and how does one play it to achieve this goal.

Schlossberg #6 was in an Adam's routine I picked up on the internet. I asked an Adams teacher about it (I took a couple lessons when I had more time than I have now). He downplayed it a bit.

Is this an integral part of most of the Adam's routines or is this one of the optional (Rx-type) sections?

-Rob
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jhatpro
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just printed Pat Harbison's 15 guiding principles and it's going on my reading stand, the one I have next to my playing stand so I can keep my brain going while I'm resting. Great insights, Pat!
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uglylips
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For those of you who are playing the Adam routine daily, how many minutes do you spend on each of the following?

1. Leadpipe

2. Long Tones

3. Clarke #1
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Froggynut
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:41 pm    Post subject: time Reply with quote

3 min on leadpipe

15min on long tones and 15 on clarke (although I slur and then tounge them)
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PH
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 6:28 am    Post subject: Re: time Reply with quote

Froggynut wrote:
3 min on leadpipe

15min on long tones and 15 on clarke (although I slur and then tounge them)


that's pretty much right on for me, too.
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craigtrumpet
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 10:40 am    Post subject: Re: time Reply with quote

PH wrote:
Froggynut wrote:
3 min on leadpipe

15min on long tones and 15 on clarke (although I slur and then tounge them)


that's pretty much right on for me, too.


me three, I also slur and tounge clarkes.
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Matthew Anklan
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2009 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

someguy6 wrote:
What is the "goal" to Schlossberg #6 and how does one play it to achieve this goal.

Schlossberg #6 was in an Adam's routine I picked up on the internet. I asked an Adams teacher about it (I took a couple lessons when I had more time than I have now). He downplayed it a bit.

Is this an integral part of most of the Adam's routines or is this one of the optional (Rx-type) sections?

-Rob



My friend Eric "hipped" me to putting Schlossberg 6 after the Glantz section. It's a great way to get everything relaxed after doing all the blowing in Clarke and Glantz. It's also a great way to stretch out your dynamics ... make your softs REALLY soft, the louds, very full and keep the sound golden throughout.

Hope that offers some clarification...

Fire it up!
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2009 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

uglylips wrote:
For those of you who are playing the Adam routine daily, how many minutes do you spend on each of the following?

1. Leadpipe

2. Long Tones

3. Clarke #1


This varies from day to day...for me. It's more of an intuitive process than a timed event. Some days it takes longer to get the sound where I want it, other days it's like I was born to play trumpet.

(Thanks to those who have been there on the "longer" days.)
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Ricetrpt
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quick question regarding the leadpipe. I've used leadpipe exercises sporadically for a long time, and always found good results. Did Adams recommend just playing long tones on the first-space F, or did he have his students go between different partials?

Thanks for any advice.
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