• FAQ  • Search  • Memberlist  • Usergroups   • Register   • Profile  • Log in to check your private messages  • Log in 

What is the appeal of modern classical music?


Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> The Lounge
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Gordontrek
Veteran Member


Joined: 08 Oct 2012
Posts: 314
Location: Huntsville, AL

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 12:26 pm    Post subject: What is the appeal of modern classical music? Reply with quote

I hope this is the appropriate forum.
As an aspiring orchestral musician, I've been exposed to my share of modern classical music. I'm talking about the typical 12-tone rattling-garbage-can music and the like. I think some of it is cool, but a lot of it has been simply painful for me to both play and listen to. Almost nothing makes sense. Just recently we had a concert where we played a piece written in 2008, and I don't even know where to begin. It sounded absolutely terrible, and on top of that it was a really hard piece for me to play. A lot of upper register and ridiculously difficult rhythms- none of which seemed to serve any purpose, only adding to my frustration.
I know the first thing you're thinking is that I'm young and hard-headed and don't appreciate art, but hear me out. I've tried to give modern music a chance to grow on me, but I just can't do it. I've listened to Schoenberg and Stockhausen many times on YouTube, and it just sounds revolting to me. Maybe not to others, but it does to me. That leads to my question, WHY is it so appealing? Why do so many conductors insist on playing it? I'm not trying to question anybody's taste in music or take anything away from composers of modern music, but can anyone explain to me why people find it so appealing??
_________________
"May God have mercy on my enemies, because I won't." George S. Patton Jr.
"Those who have achieved all their aims probably set them too low." Herbert von Karajan

Bach 18043
Eastman ETR-830S
Bach 1
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
homebilly
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2010
Posts: 2156
Location: Venice, CA & Paris, France

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hear you brother. I went as a guest to a 'jazz' concert last week.
I wanted to leave after the third note but was stuck in a corner by the sound guy. it was the worst music that I have heard in a long time. every tune sounded like the last. they all started with a rhythmic lick between the bass & piano with the trumpet and bone playing dumb hard lines for no known musical reason. then each tune eventually got to the out free solo that sounded just like the last one. pure pain and suffering. I finally bailed after 45 minutes (5th song). I felt bad for bailing on my friend the trumpeter but enough was enough I had to go. it was terrible!!! neither jazz nor musical. just noise.

he could have warned me........

ron
_________________
ron meza (deadbeat jazz musician) & (TH 5 post ghost neighborhood watch ringleader)
waiting for Fed-Ex to deliver a $50 trumpet to my door. shipping was prepaid by seller of course!
http://ronmeza.com
http://highdefinitionbigband.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
mm55
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2013
Posts: 1397

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 1:08 pm    Post subject: Re: What is the appeal of modern classical music? Reply with quote

You've compared it to garbage cans and called it revolting. With that kind of sweeping generalization and preconception, it's hard to see how any attempt at explanation would be warranted, or productive.

Beethoven, Stravinsky, Zappa, Coltrane, all made music that was reviled by some listeners during their lifetimes. Maybe it just takes time, or maybe you'll never appreciate it. The way you've posed the question, it's hard to find a way to answer it.
_________________
'75 Bach Strad 180ML/37
'79 King Silver Flair
'07 Flip Oakes Wild Thing
'42 Selmer US
'90 Yamaha YTR6450S(C)
'12 Eastman ETR-540S (D/Eb)
'10 Carol CPT-300LR pkt
'89 Yamaha YCR2330S crnt
'13 CarolBrass CFL-6200-GSS-BG flg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bamajazzlady
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 22 May 2011
Posts: 691

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gordontrek, who was it that you heard i.e. what was the artist or artists' name?
_________________
"Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending." - Maria Robinson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LittleRusty
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 11 Aug 2004
Posts: 12184
Location: Santa Clara, Ca

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The "ageless" classics have all been filtered by time. I am sure that there are some dogs that simply weren't preserved and have been lost. New music has not yet had that filter applied. Thus we are more likely to hear the dogs.

Modern art has gone through similar stages and critiques. However, with art people own the work and will keep it as it appreciates. There really isn't any equivalent with a musical piece. Where one will purchase and retain hoping for it to grow in value.

That said, pop music has gone through being despised by some and now is the basis for nostalgic ads and elevator music. I can remember people railing against the music of the 60's due to the lack of good harmonies and not being able to understand the lyrics.

re homebilly's jazz experience. I am not a fan of the jazz styles that show the technical excellence of the player. I like the styles that provide embellishments or ornamentation on the melody. I also like the big fat sounds of the big band jazz.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 7258
Location: Hawai`i - Texas

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First off, I don't think it's that popular. Just ask anyone working in contemporary arts.

Regarding conductors programming the music, I can't be an apologist for specific pieces I haven't heard (and that you haven't listed), but IMO one of the responsibilities of conductors is to put quality, contemporary music out there for the public to hear. Then they can make their own decisions.

Regarding the music, itself, I think there are three very broad categories: the accessible music that we instantly enjoy, modern music that takes some effort on our part to appreciate, but which we consider with merit, and then there's modern music that might have merit but that we just aren't comfortable with, regardless of how open we might be. Sometimes there's just nothing you can do about it.

I do believe, though, that if we want to enrich our musical lives to the fullest, we will take the effort to understand the arts and to know what to look for in them. I don't think there's a real answer to the conflicts people with good intentions towards all music have, and their inability to just love some of it.
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Bird
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis." Attributed to Chet

Benge 3X LA
Martin Committee
Getzen Capri Cornet
Adams F-1 Flghn
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dale Proctor
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 9182
Location: Heart of Dixie

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hate the stuff, both to play and to listen to. I have been known to refuse to play it when programmed if it has absolutely no musical value (in my opinion, of course).
_________________
Olde Towne Brass
www.otbrass.com

Brass Band of Huntsville
www.brassbandofhuntsville.com

"Brass bands are all very well in their place - outdoors and several miles away ." - Sir Thomas Beecham
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Crazy Finn
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 27 Dec 2001
Posts: 8168
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only thing I've got is that I'm glad folks are trying to get new works and keep the literature and genre fresh.

Yeah, a lot is absolute bunk, in my opinion. But, there's some good stuff as well. Some.

I've been in that same exact concert as the OP (not literally). I thought, well, maybe it sounds better out in the hall. I listened to the recording... nope.

Be glad you don't play sax. There's a ton of modern classical saxophone repertoire. While some of it is pretty good, there's a lot of ridiculously difficult stuff that is totally impossible to enjoy listening to. It might be interesting to analyze, but it is complete sonic garbage, in my opinion.

Gordontrek wrote:
...but can anyone explain to me why people find it so appealing??


People don't as a rule. The stuff you're talking about is fairly unpopular and give "modern" or "contemporary" classical music it's dubious reputation for being a cacophonous mess. It's unfortunate for those that actually write decent stuff, but like was mentioned above, the current classics have been filtered and edited through for several centuries. Most of the current dreck is played once and forgotten - I'm sure most of it will be left behind and unplayed.

I think Schoenberg and Berg and the others might be important intellectually, rather than musically. The twelve tone structure hasn't really taken off as a basis for music for the most part.
_________________
LA Benge 3X Bb Trumpet
Selmer Radial Bb Trumpet
Yamaha 6335S Bb Trumpet
Besson 709 Bb Trumpet
Bach 184L Bb Cornet
Yamaha 731 Bb Flugelhorn
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
trumpet_bob_silver
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 1155

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because it's different.

Because it's art.

Because it's not meant to be liked or to be easily accessible. I forget which composer said it -- Schoenberg, Berg, Webern... --- said something along the lines that if they're not creating music that the audience should like, that even needs to be heard, or that if the audience likes it they're not achieving their goal/if the audience hates it, they're doing something right. Something along that idea.


I haven't really listened to it for a while, but I developed a taste for it. You listen for a while, do something else, then come back, and it sounds different.


I ran into a percussionist once who was working on a 20th century etude. Didn't sound that great to me, but... It was different sound. I heard a similar thing with a flute etude. Fine, I'll sit through a concert and that was interesting but I don't care whether I heard it again. And maybe it's great for the percussionist or the flautist. (Trumpet has its own weird pieces, like removing valves. Is anyone really going to listen to that outside a concert hall much?) Later on, I've heard pieces that use some of those techniques I heard in the etudes though. Just a touch, but it definitely added something, something new, something different, something just right for that new piece. Some composers have to be the first to go out and explore a new sound or idea.


The stuff I don't really get at all is the concert by the experimental music area with their grad students. They roll out dozens of speakers that dong and gurgle. There aren't any performers the audience can see creating music. Even that.... I do remember some of those pieces. Sounds swirling around the audience instead of just coming from the front. It's something different. I'm still not going out of my way to hear that or sit through those concerts again.


And movies are using new ideas in the background. That's not always the most pleasant music to listen to.


Another easy reason for actual appeal -- Because it's new. A brand new, fresh piece by a living composer. How about that? Vs. something that's been around for hundreds of years, played over and over, that everyone knows, yadda, yadda, yadda. Wouldn't it be cool to hear something that's never been heard before? To be at one of those concerts where a composer who later becomes big was just starting out? Or to be around for part of the process of ushering in new music to the world? 99% crap, but something will stick around.


I suppose expectation going in affects things too. If I'm going to a concert with 20th century, I'm hesitating a bit, wondering what the technique is, wondering if it's going to sound random or be a big mass of sound, etc. Not expecting to walk out with a melody in my head. (Although it's interesting -- I am expecting to hear good playing technique -- good tone, good tuning, maybe not time if there isn't time... Which could be why the experimental speaker harsh, grating static is fairly annoying. Or just that I'm expecting music to be performed by live people at a concert.)

If you're sitting in an ensemble playing... 1) Are you really hearing/understanding the whole piece? Trumpets are probably sitting in the back -- Can you hear the flutes or the whole ensemble sound? 2) Is the conductor explaining the piece to you or just prepping it up? Does the conductor even understand the piece? (They might not. If it's new and there's a deadline on the concert, they won't have the same understanding they might have years from now. Although if it's a 2008 piece, some time has gone by.) 3) Are you playing it the right way? I doubt you're a bad performer, but it sounds like you were already wondering about the piece. There's a difference between the, "Yeh! We're in college and we just played X-piece," and, "We just played X-piece, and that's how it should be played."


Just glancing through the post again... Difficult, yes. Someone already wrote the easy stuff. Tricky rhythm. High range. Same idea -- The easy, simple rhythm, low/medium range stuff has already been covered. After this stuff.... Even more difficult stuff will come out? I suppose that's been engrained with your experience of the piece -- frustration. You learned that "into" the piece, along with your experience... sitting in the trumpet section, etc. Probably very different than the experience of the audience member, a music theorist analyzing the piece, the conductor, etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dale Proctor
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 9182
Location: Heart of Dixie

PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trumpet_bob_silver wrote:
Because it's different.

Because it's art.

Because it's not meant to be liked...


I didn't quote the whole thing, but some of your post sounds like a description of noise, racket, random claptrap to me. Most really modern music (and I use that term loosely) is nothing more than an in-your-face combination of awkward rhythms and chords. A mistake by the performers would be difficult to notice, so maybe that's the draw for those who enjoy composing and/or playing it...or maybe they get some perverse pleasure in driving an audience away. Yeah, those squares in the audience don't get it, but it's their loss, right?...
_________________
Olde Towne Brass
www.otbrass.com

Brass Band of Huntsville
www.brassbandofhuntsville.com

"Brass bands are all very well in their place - outdoors and several miles away ." - Sir Thomas Beecham
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 7258
Location: Hawai`i - Texas

PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe it's one thing to not enjoy certain music, but it's another thing to make broad sweeping statements that it is claptrap. I have a hard time thinking that something, just by virtue of its genre, is categorically crap. Whenever I get to the point that I can do that, I have to look inward.
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Bird
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis." Attributed to Chet

Benge 3X LA
Martin Committee
Getzen Capri Cornet
Adams F-1 Flghn
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dale Proctor
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 9182
Location: Heart of Dixie

PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, of course, not all modern classical music is claptrap. I was referring to some of the descriptions of modern music that trumpet_bob_silver referenced in his post. Music composed to create dislike, strange noises made by non-musical objects, cacophony designed to shock, not entertain,...that type of claptrap. I can appreciate just about any type of music if it's done well. The problem is, some of this stuff doesn't qualify as music from my viewpoint. Good music should move you, but not make you want to leave the concert hall halfway through a concert...
_________________
Olde Towne Brass
www.otbrass.com

Brass Band of Huntsville
www.brassbandofhuntsville.com

"Brass bands are all very well in their place - outdoors and several miles away ." - Sir Thomas Beecham
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gordontrek
Veteran Member


Joined: 08 Oct 2012
Posts: 314
Location: Huntsville, AL

PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
I believe it's one thing to not enjoy certain music, but it's another thing to make broad sweeping statements that it is claptrap. I have a hard time thinking that something, just by virtue of its genre, is categorically crap. Whenever I get to the point that I can do that, I have to look inward.


So are we supposed to enjoy every piece of music that's ever played in front of us?
Here's a piece by Stockhausen I listened to on Youtube that in large part prompted my "rattling-garbage-can" comparison: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqvlrphkGAU

I don't think it's crap because it's in the modern music genre, I think it's crap because it SOUNDS like crap. I don't care what genre it's in. Again, this is one that I listened to more than once, but couldn't seem to get it to grow on me. Some call it music, I call it a work that I could in some form replicate by pulling up Finale and letting my cat walk across my keyboard. While I don't deny that past composers frequently met criticism when they premiered a new work, I highly doubt anyone would have said something similar when Tchaikovsky's 6th was premiered.
Might I recommend that you go around YouTube browsing through Stockhausen videos such as the one I linked. I didn't ask this question based on hearing one work.

mm55 wrote:
You've compared it to garbage cans and called it revolting. With that kind of sweeping generalization and preconception, it's hard to see how any attempt at explanation would be warranted, or productive.

Which raises my next question- does new classical music HAVE to be atonal?? There has to be another way to advance classical music. Am I inhibiting the progress of classical music because I don't like to listen to atonal works? I'm not going to stop anyone from writing an atonal work or refuse to perform one, but really. I say that the way to inhibit the progress of classical music is to say that atonal music is the ONLY way to advance it.
A sweeping generalization, maybe, but hardly a preconception.
_________________
"May God have mercy on my enemies, because I won't." George S. Patton Jr.
"Those who have achieved all their aims probably set them too low." Herbert von Karajan

Bach 18043
Eastman ETR-830S
Bach 1
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Nonsense Eliminator
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 03 Feb 2003
Posts: 5201
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:59 am    Post subject: Re: What is the appeal of modern classical music? Reply with quote

Gordontrek wrote:
As an aspiring orchestral musician, I've been exposed to my share of modern classical music. I'm talking about the typical 12-tone rattling-garbage-can music and the like. I think some of it is cool, but a lot of it has been simply painful for me to both play and listen to. Almost nothing makes sense.

The problem is that basically all of your criticisms of new music are missing two words. In particular: "Almost nothing makes sense to me." Just because you don't perceive the structure or organization doesn't mean there isn't one or that it can't be understood. Whether or not you like 12-tone music, there are a great many people to whom, for instance, Schoenberg's string quartets or Berg's operas do make a great deal of sense.

It would seem that there is quite a lot of music you don't like, and the way you describe it indicates that at least part of the issue is lack of comprehension. The way you use the word "atonal," for instance, would be unusual for somebody who has spent much time studying music of the past 100 years. Comparatively little new music is 12-tone, and less of it is truly atonal; furthermore, some of the most approachable new music is, in fact, atonal (in that it lacks a key centre or the harmonic hierarchy characteristic of tonality), but quite diatonic. That you ask, "does new classical music HAVE to be atonal??" suggests that your experience in new music is less than comprehensive -- because while little new music is both tonal and diatonic (outside of film scores), there is plenty of it that is one or the other.

To answer the question, "What is the appeal?" well, that's simple -- it speaks to people. To be sure, there is a segment of the population that craves novelty and "likes" this music because they think it makes them cool -- the hipsters of the classical scene, I suppose. But the rather broad spectrum of music you seem to be describing as "CRAP" includes a great deal of music that is genuinely affecting to a non-trivial number of people.

Is all of it good? Of course not. Some of it is poorly-conceived or poorly-executed; I've played my share of both. Some of it -- and I think Stockhausen often fits this description -- isn't really about the same aural space as what we could call "conventional" music and therefore evaluating it for success or failure in the same terms as we'd evaluate Bartok or Shostakovich is kind of meaningless. I think, however, that you'd be surprised by how much organization and control goes into some of this apparently random music, and how much better it is than your cat or a bunch of people playing at will or whatever. As others have said, when we listen to music from 200 years ago, we don't need to listen to mediocrity or failed experiments, but those things are part of creating art.

Which 20th- (and 21st-) century composers do you actually like?
_________________
Richard Sandals
NBO ~ HSSB
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
A_Ason
Veteran Member


Joined: 20 Jan 2011
Posts: 269
Location: Uppsala, Sweden

PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gordontrek wrote:

Here's a piece by Stockhausen I listened to on Youtube that in large part prompted my "rattling-garbage-can" comparison: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqvlrphkGAU


I think it is appropriate to relate this kind of music to things like performance art and movie soundtracks. When I hear Stockhausen, my inner eyes see action movies, Hitchcock, landscapes on Mars, exotic life in deep sea etc. When I listen to Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, I see flowers, butterflies, and teddy bears

As a matter of fact, although my favorite music is jazz, I tend to prefer avant garde classical music before avant garde jazz, unless I am taking part myself.
_________________
Arne Andersson
Monettes, Eclipse, Lars Gerdt, Taylor, Del Quadro, Schilke, Getzen, Benge, Conn, Olds, Besson, Martin, Puje, Alexander, Lawler, Wild Thing, Bach, Ken Larson...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 7258
Location: Hawai`i - Texas

PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A_Ason wrote:
I think it is appropriate to relate this kind of music to things like performance art and movie soundtracks. When I hear Stockhausen, my inner eyes see action movies, Hitchcock, landscapes on Mars, exotic life in deep sea etc. When I listen to Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, I see flowers, butterflies, and teddy bears.


Generally, I hear (and write) music in the abstract, usually visualizing nothing.

In 1970, I had a wonderful experience at the World's Fair in Osaka, Japan. Germany, as it's main structure, had built a huge sphere that was intersected in the middle with a grid upon which you could walk and sit. The entire thing was constructed for Stockhausen. Speakers were suspended from all around you, a three-dimensional 360 Degrees. And high above on a ledge was The Man, himself, working some kind of control panel and with musicians on a walkway here and there. The entire thing was incredible.

(There was also a presence in another pavilion of Deutsche Grammophon with emphasis on Beethoven. That was when I decided that Germany was, indeed, a hip place, at least musically, to be.)

@Nonsense Eliminator - excellent, well thought out post.
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Bird
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis." Attributed to Chet

Benge 3X LA
Martin Committee
Getzen Capri Cornet
Adams F-1 Flghn


Last edited by kehaulani on Fri Dec 13, 2013 11:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Brad361
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 16 Dec 2007
Posts: 7012
Location: Houston, TX.

PostPosted: Fri Dec 13, 2013 6:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Music, and most other art forms are subjective....obviously. I think for those of us who have had traditional "formal training", music that strays into dissonance and very unusual rhythms seems to fly in the face of that training. Or at least it can feel that way to many of us.

Brad361
_________________
When asked if he always sounds great:
"I always try, but not always, because the horn is merciless, unpredictable and traitorous." - Arturo Sandoval
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
dstdenis
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 25 May 2013
Posts: 2123
Location: Atlanta GA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 13, 2013 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me, a lot of it isn't that appealing. But I'm an optimist, so I'm always eager to hear new works programmed on concerts. Maybe the next one will be great.

As an aspiring orchestral trumpet player, you're faced with two questions about modern music: can you play your parts well and give the conductor what he needs from your trumpet playing, and will you ever love this style of music?

I don't think you need to love it to play your part well. But it would be helpful to learn as much as you can about the genre to understand what the composer was trying to do with his music.

I don't know if you've ever taken a music history or music appreciation class, but the textbooks for these courses usually include a chapter or two on modern music. I think these are great for explaining what well-known composers were trying to do at a conceptual level and the specific techniques they used to try and make that happen. A lot of these points are obscure, and I doubt I ever would've noticed them on my own just by listening to or playing the music.

For me these explanations make the music more interesting and would guide me in how I might play it. Still might not be the favorite playlist on my iPod, but understanding it better makes it more fun to play.
_________________
Bb Yamaha Xeno 8335IIS
Cornet Getzen Custom 3850S
Flugelhorn Courtois 155R
Piccolo Stomvi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dale Proctor
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 9182
Location: Heart of Dixie

PostPosted: Fri Dec 13, 2013 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If any form of art has to be explained to be appreciated, I don't care for it. It should be apparent to the patron without the need of explanation or interpretation from someone else. That goes for poetry, painting, music, etc.
_________________
Olde Towne Brass
www.otbrass.com

Brass Band of Huntsville
www.brassbandofhuntsville.com

"Brass bands are all very well in their place - outdoors and several miles away ." - Sir Thomas Beecham
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dmb
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2002
Posts: 1305
Location: Anderson, IN

PostPosted: Fri Dec 13, 2013 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dale Proctor wrote:
If any form of art has to be explained to be appreciated, I don't care for it. It should be apparent to the patron without the need of explanation or interpretation from someone else. That goes for poetry, painting, music, etc.


I agree. Sorta like Miles Davis' "space music" from the '70s. (Btw, Miles was supposedly influenced by Stockhausen when he put this 'art' on vinyl.) Of course, I've been told that if I call it crap than it's my fault for not 'getting' it. I'm just not hip enough, or I wouldn't know great music if I stepped in it.

Well, I have stepped in crap before. It's not pleasant.
_________________
Dan Burton

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWuX9zPJWyY
-----------------------------------------------
Olds
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> The Lounge All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group