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How do teeth affect trumpet range & tone?



 
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tptguy
Jerome Callet Forum Moderator


Joined: 11 Nov 2001
Posts: 3351
Location: Philadelphia, Pa

PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2003 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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TheDubbaDubbaD
Regular Member

Joined: May 08, 2002
Posts: 36 Posted: 2002-05-11 09:46
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I have read articles, and actually written a paper in college on the subject. What are your opinions? I have also found superchops is agood method for people with irregular teeth formations. I know with a gap between my front teeth, I went to the point of dental work to improve my playing before discovering this method.

Yes finally a serious topic.

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tptguy
Heavyweight Member

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 556
From: Philadelphia, Pa
Posted: 2002-05-12 16:03
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Because of my rather large upper front "snaggletooth" I experienced totally insurmountable problems with all other "development" systems I religiously studied: Reinhardt, C. Gordon, Caruso, Colin, etc. Superchops now has me COMPLETELY beyond that. It took a number of years of effort to break my old bad habits. But now, my teeth have absolutely nothing to do with my trumpet performance. I believe Jerry Callet is correct when he says that this is the way guys with no teeth or false teeth like Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, and Harry James developed their incredible embouchures. Best regards, Kyle

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Don Herman
'Chicago School' Forum Moderator

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 1749
From: Monument, CO, USA
Posted: 2002-05-12 19:50
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My opinions are based on an article or tweo, correspondence with some knowledgable experts, and empirical evidence (best kind for me, as a hairy-knuckled dinosaur analog engineer).

(1) The formation of your teeth and gums has a definite effect, and will steer you more or les towards a particular embouchure. May make it easier or harder to play, but rest assured that people with all sorts of teeth can play from basement pedals to high Q.

(2) SC, or any embouchure (pucker, Maggio come to mind) which de-emphasizes pressure will help if your teeth stick out. Or, even if they don't! You may need to spend a bit more effort training your embouchure, as pressure won't work well in this situation. Probably a good thing!

FWIW -- my 1/2c -- Don
_________________
Don Herman/Monument, CO
"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music." - Aldous Huxley

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OCTA-C
Veteran Member

Joined: Nov 30, 2001
Posts: 404
From: Kenmore, N.Y.
Posted: 2002-05-13 08:48
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That perfect "Hollywood Smile" can sometimes be a hindrance to proper embouchure formation.


_________________

Jay S.

"May the good sound be yours!"

"Always remember to blow into the proper end of the horn!"-circa. 1900 (Harry Gardoon)

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Lex Grantham
Veteran Member

Joined: Nov 13, 2001
Posts: 340
From: East Texas
Posted: 2002-05-13 10:13
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I taped a 1944 MGM movie last week ("Bathing Beauty") on Turner Classic Movies that starred Esther Williams and Red Skelton in the leading roles, but Harry James and his Music Makers were featured in 3 or 4 musical presentations:

1) "Trumpet Blues"
2) "I Cried For You" (Helen Forrest vocal)
3) "Hora Staccato"
4) and something else

At one point in the movie, Harry James had just performed one of the numbers with the orchestra and had a brief spoken part wih Red Skelton. I could not help but notice that Harry had a rather thick lower lip...possibly from many years of practice and playing the trumpet. I have never seen a movie or still picture where the man smiled very much. I believe Jerry Callet once stated somewhere that Harry had bad teeth and did not desire to have his public see them. He was very concerned about making favorable impressions with people.

Sincerely,

Lex Grantham



[ This Message was edited by: Lex Grantham on 2002-05-13 10:38 ]

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tptguy
Heavyweight Member

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 556
From: Philadelphia, Pa
Posted: 2002-05-13 10:26
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<<<That perfect "Hollywood Smile" can sometimes be a hindrance to proper embouchure formation. >>>

Jay, I think this is curious. What aspect of good teeth could be a hindrance? Best regards, Kyle




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OCTA-C
Veteran Member

Joined: Nov 30, 2001
Posts: 404
From: Kenmore, N.Y.
Posted: 2002-05-13 19:50
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tptguy: Please don't take my statement the wrong way! What I meant by that statement is that people spend thousands and thousands of dollars on the alignment of teeth that already have a natural curve to them. I'm not talking about severe misalignments or the proverbial "snaggletooth" that must be taken care of. Straightening of one's teeth or the use of braces does not automatically mean healthy teeth and gums! In no way do I dismiss the fact on excellent dental hygiene and taking very good care of what you have!!
I was just making light reference to instances where someone will go and get that big, wide, flat, straight-across-the-face, chicklets type "Hollywood Smile" and completely ruin their set embouchure. My grandfather played cornet and by no means had near perfect alignment of his teeth but they were the brightest, whitest, strongest I had ever seen. This was due to good hygiene, not alignment!
I just made a reply pertinent to this topic and it was a general one at that!
Don't confuse a pretty smile with healthy teeth and gums. But now we're starting to get off the main topic.
I hope I clarified myself at least somewhat!?


_________________

Jay S.

"May the good sound be yours!"

"Always remember to blow into the proper end of the horn!"-circa. 1900 (Harry Gardoon)

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tptguy
Heavyweight Member

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 556
From: Philadelphia, Pa
Posted: 2002-05-13 22:51
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Jay, Yes, I too have heard of people who had their teeth straightened only to find out that their new teeth structure no longer supported their old embouchure. I think I'm now reading you correctly in saying that an original "Hollywood" smile should not be a drawback. I'm very thankful that I'm now working with SC so that teeth and jaw don't matter at all. It has been a lifesaver for me. Best regards, Kyle

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Rocky Dotson
New Member

Joined: Dec 29, 2001
Posts: 3
From: Jackson, TN
Posted: 2002-05-14 16:08
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Actually, I believe having teeth that are too perfect can hurt your trumpet playing, especially with stretch embouchures. If your front teeth are too straight, the mouthpiece works like a tourniquet to cut off circulation to your upper lip. This makes it impossible to have any endurance if you use any pressure at all. I found this to be the case with my lips after having braces. I lost a lot of my endurance because the mouthpiece put pressure on my teeth all the way accross, as opposed to in one wedge-shaped spot.
Of course, SC took care of that problem pretty easily.
Rocky Dotson
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