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Harry Hilgers
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Joined: 16 Jun 2015
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 7:04 am    Post subject: TTT Reply with quote

TTT

Last edited by Harry Hilgers on Fri Mar 01, 2019 6:06 am; edited 1 time in total
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JayKosta
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Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 1054
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It depends on the student. The time needed for a beginner to learn a proper embouchure and to produce a 'note' shouldn't be more than several minutes. The instructor should provide a good brief description and demonstration of: embouchure/lips/cheeks/chin appearance, simple mpc blow/buzz, and playing a note. Some students might take a while to understand and duplicate the instructor, and the instructor must carefully watch/listen/correct.

For more ongoing study and practice, the instructor might be heavily influenced by what 'worked for them'.

But a good instructor should be more concerned about 'what works' for the student.
If there is a basic 'positioning flaw' with the embouchure / mpc, then the student might make corrections more quickly with a short session of just the mpc.

Jay
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The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
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Andy Del
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Joined: 30 Jun 2005
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Buzzing is something we can feel. It's sensation which, for most, is rather unusual at the start of their playing journey. To create a buzz, you put compressed air through a tube. A trumpet is a tube. A mouthpiece is a tube. Your airways are a tube. The air starts in the lungs, goes through a tube, past a point which vibrates, exciting a standing wave in the horn which resonates = trumpet sound.

Those that are adamant that buzzing is not for them, or in some way a terrible technique to teach seem to forget what happens when there is ZERO buzz. It goes without saying we need to buzz to play. It's the description of how we do this that changes and causes all sorts of internet circumlocutions.

FWIW, I teach buzzing, ESPECIALLY as kids get so busy, it may be the only playing they can do some days: buzz on the way to athletics, while swimming training (free style of course) or walking to early band rehearsals where you can't warm up.

Buzzing has a practical element to it. It's a tool. It's a form of cross training.

It keeps me going when I AM busy and can't get enough practice in. Just teach it and don't worry.

cheers

Andy
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Richard III
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Joined: 22 May 2007
Posts: 1949
Location: Amador County, CA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Efficiency. There's a word that says so much. Sounds like short cuts. Sounds like doing it all in less time. Sounds like making the most of limited time. We apparently don't have time for all the things we want to do. Too many demands on our time. We want to have it all, do it all, be all, be everywhere, do everything, play all kinds of music, in all kinds of band and in all venues. We don't want to make mistakes. Go the wrong school. Use the wrong equipment. We need every advantage. We have to be the best. We have to be lead players, first chair in the professional symphony and every other high profile group. We also want to be able to play the trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, piccolo trumpet, Eb/D trumpet and soprano cornet in our community band, big band, British Brass Band, symphonic band and loud horn band. Oh and then there's marching band. We want to sound like Maynard, Doc, that Russian guy, Arturo or that guy who used to play in the CSO. You know the one with the really big mouthpiece. Yup. That's us.

Wait. That's not me. I just want to play my little cornet in a little jazz band. So I just play that little horn every day, playing the music I like. I stop when I get tired. Sorry, maybe I'm just shooting too low.
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Richard III
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Joined: 22 May 2007
Posts: 1949
Location: Amador County, CA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry. I forgot to answer the question. I think learning to play means playing the instrument and not part of the instrument.
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JoseLindE4
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Joined: 18 Apr 2003
Posts: 637

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my own practice, I play on the lips alone, mouthpiece alone, the lead pipe, and of course the whole horn. This all depends on need. Mostly I just sing and play.

In teaching, I have rarely taught playing just the lips, sometimes teach the mouthpiece, sometimes teach the lead pipe, and almost always avoid language like “compressed air” so as to avoid encouraging unneeded tension. Mostly we just sing and play.
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Harry Hilgers
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Joined: 16 Jun 2015
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DDD

Last edited by Harry Hilgers on Fri Mar 01, 2019 6:06 am; edited 1 time in total
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Rapier232
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Joined: 16 Aug 2011
Posts: 1187
Location: Twixt the Moor and the Sea, UK

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many years ago I walked into a music store and bought a trumpet and Tune a Day book one. I took it home and taught myself to play from that book. Never buzzed my lips, a mouthpiece or a leadpipe. Just blew into the trumpet. That’s about 40 years ago, and I still don’t buzz. My grandson, of 4, can blow into my trumpets and get a decent note. He doesn’t know about buzzing either. I don’t understand the need.
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JayKosta
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Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 1054
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 4:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andy Del wrote:
...
FWIW, I teach buzzing, ESPECIALLY as kids get so busy, it may be the only playing they can do some days: buzz on the way to athletics, while swimming training (free style of course) or walking to early band rehearsals where you can't warm up. ...

-----------------------------------
No buzzing, but sometimes when exercising on a rowing machine, I make a tight embouchure on each pull. I don't know if it does any good, but think it's a way to exercise the lip muscles without mpc pressure.

Jay
_________________
King Super 20 (S2 1048, HN White)
Bach 7
The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
Looking out my backdoor
http://users.hancock.net/jkosta/2020_July_6_web.jpg
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JayKosta
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 1054
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 5:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rapier232 wrote:
... He doesn’t know about buzzing either. I don’t understand the need.

-------------------
There are 10 types of people -
those who understand binary, and those who don't

Jay
_________________
King Super 20 (S2 1048, HN White)
Bach 7
The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
Looking out my backdoor
http://users.hancock.net/jkosta/2020_July_6_web.jpg
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JVL
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Joined: 07 Feb 2016
Posts: 796
Location: Nissa, France

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Free buzzing center the vibration, strengthen the embouchure.
Everytime i think to do it on a daily basis, things are easier and stronger
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Stradbrother
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Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 42

PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2019 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a student, I always free-buzzed and mouthpiece buzzed, but that was mostly due to the old-school thought of, "if you can buzz that pitch, you can play that pitch".

Now, I don't make my students do it, but I definitely understand the value for a more serious student - even if all they get is some overtraining and ear training.
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