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Do you recommend me to buy Yamaha silent brass mute?


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Tro.sy
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:10 am    Post subject: Do you recommend me to buy Yamaha silent brass mute? Reply with quote

Hello,
Does anyone here use the Yamaha silent brass system? Does the resistance get bigger when you play? I am an excercice mute to practice at home but it makes the resistance much bigger and sounds ugly as well. How is your experience with Yamaha silent brass?
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jrd19580
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use the Yamaha Silent Brass System and yes it does add a bit of resistance but the sound is pleasant. It sounds like you are in a concert hall. I would highly recommend purchasing the system!
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zaferis
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Silent Brass is an excellent practice mute... note that all practice mutes add some back pressure and ulitmately change the way we play, so I reccomend that you use them as little as possible.
However, better to practice, than not.

SB does quiet your sound significantly and can be used without bothering neighbors (great in hotels) or waking the kids...

For me there are a number of added benefits to these systems:
1. With the headphones on you can hear and amplify your sound so you back off blowing a little which does help to mitigate the pack pressure.
2. Hearing yourself from the bell end is an interesting/beneficial additon to practice. critical listening
3. At performances, in halls or green rooms where many are making noise you can quietly warm-up and hear yourself without competing with the masses
4. You can run play along tracks into the module, great for improv studies

For just blowing a few notes prior to a gig or rehearsal, there are other excellent less complicated mutes and devices
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Tro.sy
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jrd19580 wrote:
I use the Yamaha Silent Brass System and yes it does add a bit of resistance but the sound is pleasant. It sounds like you are in a concert hall. I would highly recommend purchasing the system!


Do you think there is less resistance compared to other practice mutes? I am using a practice mute and it's very good if u like to practice at night no one hears you, but it adds a lot of resistance, so am looking for something that produces less resistance!
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scottfsmith
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 5:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say it has a similar level of resistance as a normal practice mute. I'm not sure it is worth the money but I bought it so I use it.
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Billy B
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

no
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All practice mutes are not the same. Which one are you using?

I live in an Independent Living Facility, so I use the mute a lot. Best noise reduction of many I've played. I agree with zaferis; good observations.

One thing I would add, is to use it at a medium or low volume to mediate the resistant/kickback consequences. And play the horn open as much as possible.
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Rapier232
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’m rehearsing for a show at the moment and the Silent Brass is a godsend. The MD records our rehearsals, so that the cast have a ‘live band’ recording for them to rehearse to. I use those recordings, played through my SB, with headphones to practice my part. I can do this in one room and not disturb any of the family in the rest of the house. Invaluable.
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Andy Del
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A practice mute should be a last resort after trying to find ways to practice unmuted at different times and locations. One can also NOT be on the horn at conduct useful and sometimes more beneficial practice through listening, isometric exercises, buzzing, singing, etc.

It's about being efficient, clever and the end result - performance- rather than making noise for X hours a day.

cheers

Andy
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cheiden
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most practice mutes are somewhat unpleasant to use. Some are almost impossible. I don't hate the original Yamaha SB, and hear the newer design is quite a bit better. I try hard to only ever use a practice mute when there really is no other option. Sometimes for quiet-ish warm-up I'll use a Harmon without stem and that's plenty quiet for many situations.
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Nate
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use the Silent Brass mute (the newer version), and I appreciate it and like it a lot. I recommend it. It allows me to practice early in the morning without disturbing my upstairs neighbors. As others have typed there is some back pressure -- but it's not terrible. There are some intonation issues as well.

One "cool" thing is that it allows me to play pedals all the way to 2nd pedal G much more easily than on my open horn. I also have it set up for recording my practicing which is helpful to encourage "active" rest -- I can listed to what I just played and use that as my rest and get a sense of what I need to work on more to improve.
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Brad361
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I REALLY dislike the SB, but as a former apartment dweller I have used it.
I would use it IF your only option for practicing is a SB or other practice mute, I believe they add too much resistance and markedly change horn response.

Better than not practicing, but finding another way to practice is a much better option. I have practiced by aiming into a full closet, even in my car.

Brad
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jondrowjf@gmail.com
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:39 am    Post subject: Practice mute Reply with quote

I owed an earlier model of the SB. Didn't like and promptly sold it.

Do like my Bremmer sshhmute.
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The older and newer ones are not the same.
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jondrowjf@gmail.com
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:00 am    Post subject: SB mute Reply with quote

After researching, I see they have improved the technology. So the cost is $154.00 and above. If you buy one and don't like it, would be easy to sell.
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kehaulani
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Check eBay for the going prices and how long or short it takes them to be old.
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DaveH
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have any experience with the Silent Brass.

But my opinion is that the less muted practicing you do, the better.

Long ago when I lived at home, there were times when I would sit in my bedroom and practice using a cup mute because I didn't like the acoustics of the bedroom and it was too loud in that space. I was doing that enough so that over a period of time, practicing with the mute was making some subtle, but negative changes in my overall playing when playing the horn open.

Of course, that was long before anything like the Silent Brass was invented, and no one advised against muted practicing, so I had to learn by experience.

I practiced in the living room instead without the mute.

So, my opinion is to play with the horn open most of the time. I would recommend a judicious use of mutes in general.
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jrd19580
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tro.sy wrote:
jrd19580 wrote:
I use the Yamaha Silent Brass System and yes it does add a bit of resistance but the sound is pleasant. It sounds like you are in a concert hall. I would highly recommend purchasing the system!


Do you think there is less resistance compared to other practice mutes? I am using a practice mute and it's very good if u like to practice at night no one hears you, but it adds a lot of resistance, so am looking for something that produces less resistance!


It is about the same as a practice mute! But like others have said, because of the headphones you don't have to blow really hard to hear a nice pleasant sound!
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Ridgernr
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2019 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is so totally new to me. Does anybody make a system like this that I can plug a CD player into it so I can play along with Albert or Mangioni etc.?
Ok, nevermind. Just read the specs. Buying one. This is exciting!
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J.D. Heckathorn
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I live in a condo (hopefully for not much longer) and have found the newest iteration of the Yamaha Silent Brass to be invaluable for me to practice at odd times like early in the morning and late at night. I had a complaint it was too loud shortly after I moved in so I tried the silent brass, and a few other practice mutes and ultimately chose the silent brass.

It can mess with your intonation, but as long as you keep it in your mind that there is an adjustment to me had when playing open it shouldn't be an issue after some flexibility and long tone warmups.

Another thing is to make sure you have the volume up all the way on the unit, it will alleviate the urge to overblow to hear yourself. I actually find I play better after a week of using the SB only then playing without it for a session. It's almost like taking a bat weight off in baseball, I feel more in control and respond in an organic way to the natural acoustic feedback of my sound instead of the digitally modeled version. This is just my anecdotal experience, it's always better to play open but if the reality of your playing situation doesn't allow it then you have to do what you must to get in practice. Don't let the lack of ideal practice conditions stop you from practicing.
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