• FAQ  • Search  • Memberlist  • Usergroups   • Register   • Profile  • Log in to check your private messages  • Log in 

Stevens' upstream?


Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> High Range Development
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 4532
Location: Texas, by way of Germany and Hawai'i

PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:12 pm    Post subject: Stevens' upstream? Reply with quote

Is this lead player using a Stevens' upstream embouchure?
https://www.facebook.com/USAFBand/videos/2963554287042063
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Charlie Parker
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis."
Chet Baker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JayKosta
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 983
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks to me that for the upper range he uses a lot of lower jaw (lower teeth and lip) forward pressure against the mouthpiece.
For me, that reduces rim pressure against the upper lip to allow the upper lip to vibrate better, and gives the impression of blowing air out from lips and upward towards nose/nostrils.
For me, tongue arch and position must be coordinated with jaw position for best results.

Jay
_________________
King Super 20 (S2 1048, HN White)
Bach 7
The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
Looking out my backdoor
http://www.pronetisp.net/~jkosta/2020_May_31_web.jpg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pete
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Nov 2001
Posts: 1690
Location: Western Massachusetts

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:44 am    Post subject: Re: Stevens' upstream? Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
Is this lead player using a Stevens' upstream embouchure?
https://www.facebook.com/USAFBand/videos/2963554287042063


I don't believe that Brian MacDonald uses a Stevens upstream setup. He seems to be a downstream player. He gets great results, whatever he is doing!

Pete
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dstpt
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 14 Dec 2005
Posts: 627

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:47 am    Post subject: Re: Stevens' upstream? Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
Is this lead player using a Stevens' upstream embouchure?
https://www.facebook.com/USAFBand/videos/2963554287042063

I would say definitely the initial trumpeter shown in the video is playing with an upstream set, but I believe you mean to credit Doc Reinhardt rather than Roy Stevens. Reinhardt worked with many (hundreds, thousands?) of brass players during his career as a brass instructor, who then observed and devised a system that divided various embouchure "types." He then used the system to help players "discover" how one "type" might be of benefit over another for the individual player. A position ("type") for an upstream airstream was included in his method.

Our own Moderator for the Reinhardt Method Rich Willey is well-schooled in this as well as trombonist Dave Wilken. On his website, Dave invites people to submit videos for discussion, so you could pose this question to him (wilktone.com).

The Stevens-Costello chop building approach is a separate embouchure development system. Much to learn from it as well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
boppin' bob
New Member


Joined: 05 Jan 2020
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 1:24 pm    Post subject: Stevens upstream? Reply with quote

The lead player has that certain "look" when a 1/3 top lip - 2/3 bottom lip ratio is used and the lower jaw is thrust forward. This lip ratio was recommended a long time back by Arban, among others. However, I've studied with pros that employed various lip ratios; (Adelstein) more toward the 1/3 top lip type and Broiles, who was the direct opposite, used mostly top lip. Adelstein remarked that the 1/3 top lip makes it easier to play (relatively speaking) Broiles, on the other hand, told me that sometimes prior to a performance ( during a warm-up) he couldn't even get a note out. Then there are those trumpeters that use 1/2 and 1/2. Logic suggests that the proximity of performing with a 1/3 top lip ratio pretty much dictates that the air stream hits the upper wall of the mouthpiece, hence 'up stream'. But what about the other ratios? Is there a common denominator between all them? Check out the embouchure "looks" of Derek Watkins (RIP) performing with James Last or Bud Herseth (RIP) with Chicago and some of the early pix of Maynard (RIP)- 50's and Doc Severinson. They are all 1/3 top lip types. All of the players mentioned here have extraordinary talent achieved in part by their individual set-up that works best for them. I theorize that the 2/3 top lip players like Botti, Davidson(RIP)Broiles(RIP) and Andre(RIP) somehow were able to jut the lower jaw out so as to direct the airstream upwards. Maybe all the upstream players have the "secret."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 4532
Location: Texas, by way of Germany and Hawai'i

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, Bob, thanks.
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Charlie Parker
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis."
Chet Baker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dstpt
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 14 Dec 2005
Posts: 627

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 4:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Stevens' upstream? Reply with quote

dstpt wrote:
kehaulani wrote:
Is this lead player using a Stevens' upstream embouchure?
https://www.facebook.com/USAFBand/videos/2963554287042063

I would say definitely the initial trumpeter shown in the video is playing with an upstream set, but I believe you mean to credit Doc Reinhardt rather than Roy Stevens. Reinhardt worked with many (hundreds, thousands?) of brass players during his career as a brass instructor, who then observed and devised a system that divided various embouchure "types." He then used the system to help players "discover" how one "type" might be of benefit over another for the individual player. A position ("type") for an upstream airstream was included in his method.

Our own Moderator for the Reinhardt Method Rich Willey is well-schooled in this as well as trombonist Dave Wilken. On his website, Dave invites people to submit videos for discussion, so you could pose this question to him (wilktone.com).

The Stevens-Costello chop building approach is a separate embouchure development system. Much to learn from it as well.

Need to clarify:

Kevin Burns is the first trumpeter shown in the clip (03:35):
I played in a section with Kevin years ago, and he is definitely an upstream player.

Brian MacDonald is playing lead; he’s the one that plays the double high C at the end of the tune:

https://www.music.af.mil/Home/Biographies/Display/Article/1308266/senior-master-sergeant-brian-f-macdonald/

Brian is a downstream player.

Although lip ratio, top to bottom, can be a contributing factor to the airstream being upstream or downstream, it is not a universal determiner. A player could have a ⅓ upper lip ⅔ lower lip with mouthpiece placement and still be a downstream player. At least that is my understanding from the (limited) exposure and instruction I have had from Reinhardt aficionados.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lionel
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 25 Jul 2016
Posts: 638

PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 2:07 am    Post subject: Re: Stevens' upstream? Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
Is this lead player using a Stevens' upstream embouchure?
https://www.facebook.com/USAFBand/videos/2963554287042063


The answer would seem to be either "yes" or "probably".

His ease of playing + that sizzle with the forward jaw position is typical of the Stevens system. However a certain number of trumpet players blow this way naturally (lucky fellows!). So to call them Stevens advocates may not be correct.

As for Reinhardt? Doc Reinhardt was kind of a competitor of Stevens back in the day. He didn't always have a lot of good thoughts about Stevens. However if we examine the "Type IVA" "upstream" of Reinhardt's description we'll find it to be virtually identical to the Stevens system. The main difference was that Reinhardt had another half dozen more embouchure configurations besides the IVA and he would only rarely try to convert someone to the Type UVA. Not unless he felt that they were a good fit for it.

Conversely Roy Stevens would teach ONLY this particular technique. Both strategies have merit. Both have liabilities. Yet the two men were giants in their day.
_________________
"It is surprising how skilled you can become on a very limited (trumpet) embouchure and how many years you can play on that and then how difficult it is to correct that once you find that it is tremendously limited". Bill Moriarty, 2005
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pepperdean
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 10 Mar 2004
Posts: 637
Location: Johnson City, Texas

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I spent considerable time studying with Roy Stevens and Doc Reinhardt and, frankly, this discussion confuses me. Yes, Roy had an emphasis on tooth aperture that we worked on with coffee stirrers but his work was really about muscle engagement in response to air. There never was mention of upstream or downstream.

Doc Reinhardt had numerous embouchure classifications and the "book" he complied for you was personalized to the individual student. Upstream players were those where the air hit the mouthpiece cup above the throat. He demonstrated and analyzed this with a clear plastic mouthpiece. (I still have the one he gave me) Upstream and downstream in the Reinhardt world really had no bearing on the angle of the trumpet.

To my experience, both of these gentlemen were fully engaged with their methods. I never heard them mention each other or other eminent teachers at the time, like Carmine or Jerry Callet. There was a lot of competition between teachers, mostly in New York from my experience, and there were comments about others' teaching methods but I never heard it from these two.


Alan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
bach_again
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 2294
Location: Northern Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brian is a textbook type IIIB downstream.

Kevin (first guy you see/hear) is upstream (I want to say type IV but I am less schooled in the upstream types).

I've never heard Kevin mention Stevens/Costello, that is not to discount the possibility.

Both have tremendously beautiful and amazing trumpet sounds!
_________________
Check out Barkley Microphones!

www.facebook.com/barkleymic
www.instagram.com/barkleymicrophones
www.barkleymic.com

John Lake, solo trumpet, Infinity ribbon mic:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LkI7uvqDzc
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 4532
Location: Texas, by way of Germany and Hawai'i

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pepperdean wrote:
Yes, Roy had an emphasis on tooth aperture that we worked on with coffee stirrers but . . There never was mention of upstream or downstream.

I have my Stevens book packed right now (try moving during this pandemic - jeez), but I thought he advocated aiming the air stream towards the upper part of the mouthpiece. Is that wrong?
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Charlie Parker
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis."
Chet Baker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JayKosta
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 983
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pepperdean wrote:
I spent considerable time studying with Roy Stevens and Doc Reinhardt and, frankly, this discussion confuses me. Yes, Roy had an emphasis on tooth aperture that we worked on with coffee stirrers but his work was really about muscle engagement in response to air. There never was mention of upstream or downstream.
...

-------------------------------
I'm guessing that PEPPERDEAN was relating his personal experience with Stevens, not the full breadth of discussion that Stevens had with others.

Jay
_________________
King Super 20 (S2 1048, HN White)
Bach 7
The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
Looking out my backdoor
http://www.pronetisp.net/~jkosta/2020_May_31_web.jpg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lionel
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 25 Jul 2016
Posts: 638

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kehaulani wrote:
pepperdean wrote:
Yes, Roy had an emphasis on tooth aperture that we worked on with coffee stirrers but . . There never was mention of upstream or downstream.

I have my Stevens book packed right now (try moving during this pandemic - jeez), but I thought he advocated aiming the air stream towards the upper part of the mouthpiece. Is that wrong?



Yes. As a matter of fact you can see a black & white drawing or sketch of a trumpet player's head and mouthpiece on page 35 of the 2nd edition (assuming that you have the same second edition as I have). In the drawing a line is drawn showing the positioning of the air going diagonally UP in the mouthpiece.

I think that it was our forum friend Pepperdean who mentioned that Roy didn't exactly hammer the concept of "upstream" vs "downstream". These are of course Reinhardt concepts. And yes there was at least a little bit of anger between Reinhardt and Stevens.

Back in college we had three or so camps of trumpet geeks. The largest was the Caruso crowd. Next came Reinhardt where we had three majors studying with him. And the third was the Stevens-Costello camp which included a really good trumpet player but a non major and myself. Even though I never made the complete embouchure change until starting in late 2019.

The dissonance between Reinhardt and Stevens came from Reinhardt himself. I never heard Roy say an ill word about anyone. However Doc Reinhardt's accusation was actually a fairly good one. He said this of Roy Stevens,

'I'm sorry but there's no such thing as a "doctor of embouchure degree"...'

This in reference to Stevens words describing himself in his 1st edition of his Triple C technique. He or his editor gave him the title of "Dr of Embouchure". He really did. And perhaps Stevens shouldn't have referred to himself specifically as a "dr of embouchure". If only because it left him open to easy criticism. Reinhardt was right. There was no degree in that field. However if anyone ever did deserve such a title? Then Roy Stevens certainly was the man..

As many poor guys would come into his office with horrific injuries to their chops. New York City was a hotbed of pro trumpet players. Fierce competition. Some poor cats abusing their chops so badly that blood would flow out the bell. The horn needing a good cleaning afterwards to blast out the coagulated blood. Gross but true my friend. Roy didn't cure them overnight. As no one can do that. He did however teach them the fundamentals of embouchure function. Along with the physical laws that the trumpet player must abide by in order to play the complete range of the instrument. And his results were fantastic. For those who applied themselves and for those who seemed to fit the embouchure well.

During my own research I believe that I've found the "missing link" to the Stevens-Costello. Or in other words the reason why some people couldn't accept and work out this embouchure system. While others could.

To my mind the Stevens-Costello system was not in error but instead it just wasn't complete! There was at least one more characteristic needed to complete the system. To allow it to work for ALL of those trying it.
_________________
"It is surprising how skilled you can become on a very limited (trumpet) embouchure and how many years you can play on that and then how difficult it is to correct that once you find that it is tremendously limited". Bill Moriarty, 2005
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pepperdean
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 10 Mar 2004
Posts: 637
Location: Johnson City, Texas

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First off, let's qualify anything I write because this was a LONG time ago. However, memories of those days are vivid and I've put a lot of that information to use for many years.

My experience with Roy Stevens was not just personal because Roy ran his studio as an open clinic. He had chairs with writing desks arranged in his studio and encouraged students to come early and stay late to observe and learn from others' experiences. I met a number of incredible trumpet players while sitting in Roy's studio.

I do not recall Roy ever telling someone to blow to the top of the mouthpiece. Actually, that was something I tried putting into practice with a Caruso exercise I picked up from another player. It was bad information and I learned that when I began studying with Carmine.

I can't really respond to references in the texts. I do own Roy's book, Doc's "Encyclopedia", and Jerry Callet's "Trumpet Yoga," all purchased after I began lessons with them. The only time I've really looked at them was when a friend might reference something in the book and I'd look at it for context. Since I had access to them in person, I felt there was no need to rad the books.

There is a great contrast between Doc and Roy Stevens because Roy had one approach. Everyone did the same thing. Doc, on the other hand, gave a very detailed individual analysis to each student and tailored the assigned material to those attributes.

Alan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
kehaulani
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2003
Posts: 4532
Location: Texas, by way of Germany and Hawai'i

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, could you distill Steven's goals which are specific to him? Thanks.

Also, and this is for anyone else, where does the upstream goal of playing come from? Not a detailed explanation of what it is, just it's origin.
_________________
"If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Charlie Parker
"Even if I could play like Wynton Marsalis, I wouldn't play like Wynton Marsalis."
Chet Baker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JayKosta
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 983
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pepperdean wrote:
... I do not recall Roy ever telling someone to blow to the top of the mouthpiece. ...

------------------------------------
Did Stevens give instructions about things such as:
- teeth alignment and separation
- lip position
- jaw position
that would themselves result in control of the air stream direction?

And did Stevens seem to do 'careful watching' of students to make sure they were using the technique from his instructions?

Jay
_________________
King Super 20 (S2 1048, HN White)
Bach 7
The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
Looking out my backdoor
http://www.pronetisp.net/~jkosta/2020_May_31_web.jpg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pepperdean
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 10 Mar 2004
Posts: 637
Location: Johnson City, Texas

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Specific to Roy Stevens? Yes and no. For all of trumpet players' (over?)-analysis, we all basically do the same things when we're playing. I felt my teachers were all working on pretty much the same thing though each had their own way of approaching the solution. I'll try to answer your questions but, please forgive me if I add some of my own conclusions along the way.

As to Roy Stevens and tooth aperture, remember when coffee stirrers were wooden sticks? He had us get a supply of those. We'd glue two together - one flat as a base and one glued perpendicular on top of it. Think of an upside-down T if you looked at the end. You then placed this between your teeth to demonstrate what the proper tooth aperture should be. (You can really do the same thing with a pencil) You could also gently close the lips around the coffee stirrers and blow. The muscles would engage and the embouchure would form. The amount of tension in the chops would depend on how hard you blew. One of Carmine's basic muscle movements he was tryign to time or synchronize was the lips effort against the air trying to blow apart. This engagement is wht I've always called appropriate tension for the note/volume you were trying to play. The trick is "appropriate" and not excess tension.

Roy then had us set the tooth aperture, put the horn on the palm of our hand, gently close the lips, and blow. The embouchure would engage, and we would play the statics or soft ascending glisses. The embouchure was reacting to the air and creating the note changes rather than mouthpiece pressure.

The key was to keep the meeting line of the lips lined up in the space created by the tooth aperture. This is the key. If the jaw is down and the teeth are open but excess tension pulls the meeting point of the lips above or below where the air flows through the teeth, you're in trouble.

Carmine talked about the "twist, " the motion of the horn through different registers and coordinating that motion. This was nothing but a way to keep the lips aligned with the tooth opening. For example, some players recede their jaw as they ascend. The tooth opening is still there but it is no longer veritcal. The distance between the teeth may be the same when measured for the top teeth back (slightly) to the bottom teeth. Thus, the bell of the horn dips slightly to keep the tooth-lip-mouthpiece alignment. Doc called this a "pivot" where Carnine called it a twist.

I hope that answers some questions and maybe advances the discussion. If we were all sitting together, I'd feel more comfortable in my ability to be clear. Typing and trying to be succinct and yet be thorough is a tough balance.

Alan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
JayKosta
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 24 Dec 2018
Posts: 983
Location: Endwell NY USA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alan, thank you for the information.

Specifically about Stevens, in the following example, would Stevens condone using horn 'twist' or 'pivot' for a player who recedes the jaw on higher motes? And did Stevens mention a need to adjust the amount and position of lip pressure (upper/lower) for different registers?

pepperdean wrote:
... For example, some players recede their jaw as they ascend. The tooth opening is still there but it is no longer veritcal. The distance between the teeth may be the same when measured for the top teeth back (slightly) to the bottom teeth. Thus, the bell of the horn dips slightly to keep the tooth-lip-mouthpiece alignment. Doc called this a "pivot" where Carnine called it a twist. ...


Jay
_________________
King Super 20 (S2 1048, HN White)
Bach 7
The 'next note' is the most important one.
Don't take a '20 minute mouthpiece' to a 1 hour session.
Looking out my backdoor
http://www.pronetisp.net/~jkosta/2020_May_31_web.jpg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pepperdean
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 10 Mar 2004
Posts: 637
Location: Johnson City, Texas

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With Roy, there was no twist and no (minimal) pressure. Remember, you were learning to have your embouchure respond while the horn was laying flat on your palm. Gradually, as your chops developed, the statics became louder. I remember Roy with a decibel meter talking about how one student played a high G on his palm at 160 db.

As a professional player, I began my advanced study and set my foundation with Carmine so I don't really know the experience of those who only studied with Roy and followed through to very advanced playing. For me, the exercises enhanced what I was already doing.

I do remember Roy telling a story about Lin Biviano (one of Roy's students). Lin called Roy in a panic because he had a recording session with Buddy Rich where he had a high note solo. According to Lin, he couldn't play above the staff. Two hours before the session, Lin met with Roy and it took an hour-and-a-half to put his chops back together.

Alan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Lionel
Heavyweight Member


Joined: 25 Jul 2016
Posts: 638

PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pepperdean wrote:
With Roy, there was no twist and no (minimal) pressure. Remember, you were learning to have your embouchure respond while the horn was laying flat on your palm. Gradually, as your chops developed, the statics became louder. I remember Roy with a decibel meter talking about how one student played a high G on his palm at 160 db.

As a professional player, I began my advanced study and set my foundation with Carmine so I don't really know the experience of those who only studied with Roy and followed through to very advanced playing. For me, the exercises enhanced what I was already doing.

I do remember Roy telling a story about Lin Biviano (one of Roy's students). Lin called Roy in a panic because he had a recording session with Buddy Rich where he had a high note solo. According to Lin, he couldn't play above the staff. Two hours before the session, Lin met with Roy and it took an hour-and-a-half to put his chops back together.

Alan


Thanks Alan. I can only speculate but will guess that Biviano, an incredibly powerful lead player, had started to let his upper lip ride too far up on his upper teeth.

Cause & Effect

As what else could make such a strong trumpet player lose his chops but then get them back together so quickly? If it had been a swollen lip Lin couldn't have repaired his chops so fast. He'd have needed rest. However if he'd started to "smile" or allow his corners to rise? The,

"Reed comes out of the mouthpiece".

At this point all he'd need to do is "put the reed back where it belongs".

Spoke to Dr William Moriarty yesterday for the first time. An amazing man I felt like a school kid meeting his childhood idol. Among other things we chatted about the "Two Aperture Theory" which lies at the base of Stevens-Costello. In fact I'd prefer to call it the "Two Aperture Law" or principle. Because it's just so basic.

Then I talked about the amount of time I've been doing the complete conversion to Stevens. Which is going on close to 5 months. Bill agreed with me on my theory that a beginner shouldn't practice a lot of tonguing exercises. Not until the upper register and all registers for that matter are a lot more solid.

I then mused that perhaps Caruso knew this too. The basis for his breath attacks.

And lastly he reminded me that just because Stevens method starts with high note statics? It doesn't mean that we're going to develop fantastic range overnight. In my own playing I'm concentrating on flexibility exercises. And only mildly delving into articulation.

This is not the first time I've changed embouchure and started to learn high notes. The first time was on the Maggio system. And it took me several years of blowing some really sweet high notes before I could articulate them well.

The magician first must learn to juggle three balls before adding the fourth.

I can't tell you how incredible of a person Bill Moriarty is. And it's a damned shame that during his life that Roy Stevens had to endure so much criticism.
_________________
"It is surprising how skilled you can become on a very limited (trumpet) embouchure and how many years you can play on that and then how difficult it is to correct that once you find that it is tremendously limited". Bill Moriarty, 2005
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    trumpetherald.com Forum Index -> High Range Development All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group