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Criteria for evaluating a new student trumpet?


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Jenny Lee
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Joined: 06 Jun 2021
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 6:44 pm    Post subject: Criteria for evaluating a new student trumpet? Reply with quote

Hi All,

I work for a website that writes about trumpets and other instruments and was hoping to get your feedback on a particular article one of our staff writers authored: https://musicalinstrumentguide.com/jean-paul-usa-tr-330/.

Specifically, do these capture all the main considerations someone should have in mind when buying a student trumpet for someone:

1. Price
2. Playability
3. Trumpet durability and maintenance
4. Sound and intonation
5. Commitment to playing trumpet
6. Accessories included
7. Manufacturer’s warranty
8. Specifications

As someone who occasionally turns to this forum for inspiration, I really appreciate any insight you guys could offer. Cheers!
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LittleRusty
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Jean Paul USA instruments span the full range of competence—from student instruments like the TR-330, to intermediate and professional instruments. This is a common trait among higher-end brands and shows a deeper expertise and knowledge of quality than you’ll typically find in lesser-known brands.

I struggled with the first sentence in the quote. I think writing “cover the full range of player competence” wouldn’t have caused confusion for me.

Also many higher-end brands, think boutique shops, don’t offer student/intermediate/pro options.

Quote:
quick to replace many of the effected instruments.

I think this should be affected.

Quote:
Monel pistons are also more expensive and more commonly found in intermediate and professional trumpets.

According to a major legacy instrument manufacturer nickel plated valves have double the labor cost over monel. They also state “labor is the biggest cost”.

Quote:
Lacquers tend to be less expensive but can tarnish easily and need to be cleaned often.

Huh??? Lacquer tarnishing? New to me, I thought it was silver and raw brass that tarnish. Even gold can have a tarnish issue as the silver underplating can tarnish.

Quote:
But expect a bit more work to maintain its shine.

My silver plated instruments are much more work to maintain. Especially since my lacquer instruments require zero effort.

Quote:
Given its low price and decent workmanship, the TR-330 doesn’t need(s) a massive commitment on the part of the student to justify the purchase due to the possible valve issues..

It is nice that the valve issues are so clearly stated. For me this is not just a no, but h*ll no, when it comes to an instrument. Even with a warranty the trumpet will be out of the player’s hands to fix. Weeks if it has to be shipped.

Also, there is nothing more discouraging to any level player, but especially for a beginner, than a valve that randomly sticks causing forced errors.
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hibidogrulez
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's my feedback. Use it or leave it as you see fit.

In general, you give a lot of background information that may be better served in a separate article describing the many options. For example, when discussing finishes, there's little point in describing finish options that the instrument doesn't have, but an article about finishes in general would make a great read.
Also, the TR-330 has an option for a nickel finish that your article doesn't describe at all (and that would be useful to have pros and cons for).

Quote:
The Jean Paul USA TR-330 has a red brass lead pipe.

The Jean Paul website claims that their TR-330 has a yellow brass leadpipe in the short description, and rose brass in the specs. Are you sure it's rose brass?

Quote:
Based in the United States, Jean Paul USA is a fairly popular brand among trumpet players and other musicians. The company not only manufactures trumpets and other brass instruments like trombones and saxophones, but also flutes and clarinets.

This is a bit vague, but it's easily read as Jean Paul manufacturing their own instruments, and in the USA as well. Other reviews state that Jean Paul imports instruments from China and then add the Jean Paul brand. You may wish to add that to the article. Jean Paul themselves are equally vague on their own site though, so it's not just you.

Quote:
Instrument brands which are that responsive is rare. And customer service becomes a relevant factor when exercising a warranty, as we’ll see.

This is a bit unfair towards a lot of other brands. Is Jean Paul's customer service better than say, Bach, Getzen or Yamaha's? Not to mention that with most of the major brands you often don't even need warranty.

Quote:
So if you later choose to resell the trumpet, as long as it’s still in decent condition, you can expect to recoup nearly half the cost of buying it new

Given that the Jean Paul is essentially competing with second hand Yamaha student trumpets, that's quite a bit. The second had Yamaha can probably be sold for nearly 100% of what you'd pay for a second hand one. And what's the reason for not buying a Jean Paul second hand, if that's 60% cheaper and they're so durable?

Quote:
Most musicians will

You mention 'most musicians' several times. You may wish to re-write it to 'many' just to be on the safe side. Trumpet Herald's wisdom seems that if there's one thing most trumpet players will agree on, is that trumpet players disagree on just about everything.

Quote:
And speaking of quality, another strength of Jean Paul USA is that their technical team inspects each instrument in the U.S. before shipping.
...
And sometimes trumpets ship with scratched finish, sticky valves or some other imperfection.

These 2 statements seem to be in direct contradiction. If Jean Paul inspects each instrument before shipping, how is it possible that they're shipped with defects?

Quote:
Finally, trumpet bells are typically constructed in one of two ways:

Your article doesn't mention what type of bell of the TR-330 has.
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Jenny Lee
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@LittleRusty
Thanks for your feedback.

Good catch with the clarity issues you spotted.

Re: some of the other comments you made:

Quote:
According to a major legacy instrument manufacturer nickel plated valves have double the labor cost over monel. They also state “labor is the biggest cost”.


I think you're talking about Getzen? I see they've mentioned their nickel plated valves are superior and more expensive. I wasn't sure if there was a consensus on this or not, given the controversy surrounding Monel vs. plated vs. stainless steel valves. But perhaps you're right about the cost--I see no reason why Getzen would make that up.

Quote:
Huh??? Lacquer tarnishing? New to me, I thought it was silver and raw brass that tarnish. Even gold can have a tarnish issue as the silver underplating can tarnish.


So is it fair to say that plating requires more maintenance but offers better sound (thinner finish = better vibration)?

Quote:

Given its low price and decent workmanship, the TR-330 doesn’t need(s) a massive commitment on the part of the student to justify the purchase due to the possible valve issues..

It is nice that the valve issues are so clearly stated. For me this is not just a no, but h*ll no, when it comes to an instrument. Even with a warranty the trumpet will be out of the player’s hands to fix. Weeks if it has to be shipped.


I'm not sure if I understand this point. It seems the TR-330 shouldn't require a major commitment simply because it's a small investment. On the other hand, a more expensive student model like, say, Bach, would probably warrant a bigger commitment from the student that they would play for a few years or more.
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RETrumpet
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I concur with the other replies, but a couple things stand out to me.

Quote:
The company not only manufactures trumpets and other brass instruments like trombones and saxophones, but also flutes and clarinets.


Saxophones are woodwinds, not brass instruments. They are more closely related to flutes and clarinets than trumpets. As soon as I read this you lose credibility as instrument specialists instantly and I start to question everything else in the article.

Quote:
When it comes to student trumpets, the ideal mouthpiece is usually one with a relatively small rim, giving the trumpeter greater control, and a large “C” cup, giving the trumpeter greater volume.


The rim comment is debatable but there's a lot of cause and effect stuff that your reader doesn't want/need to know, so it's probably okay as a generalization (IMO). However a C cup in the Bach system which is what is used by Jean Paul and many others is in the middle, it isn't "large". In fact, a 7C is a relatively small mouthpiece in the grand scheme. It's fine for many students, but it isn't large.

Quote:

Thoroughly clean and oil the valves. Students should oil the valves even if playing a new trumpet for the first time.


Theoretically, valves have their tightest tolerances when they are new. New valves need to be oiled more often than older valves and should be wiped down every day to every few days (and then reoiled) to remove any fine metal shavings or other debris that can lead to the aforementioned stickiness. This is true for all brands. Again, probably too much info, but a more direct statement is probably needed. "Clean and oil your valves daily" or something to that effect. Ideally they do it everyday forever, but I'm a realist (and I don't even do that myself).
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Jenny Lee
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@hibidogrulez
Hey There--thanks very much for giving your feedback. As to your specific points:

Quote:
In general, you give a lot of background information that may be better served in a separate article describing the many options. For example, when discussing finishes, there's little point in describing finish options that the instrument doesn't have, but an article about finishes in general would make a great read.


You make a good point here. Not only could some sections be redone in a separate dedicated article, but these details as they are get a bit too into the weeds for the intended audience (who likely doesn't know much about trumpets to begin).


Quote:
Also, the TR-330 has an option for a nickel finish that your article doesn't describe at all (and that would be useful to have pros and cons for).


Another point taken. The TR-330N is technically a different model. But the only difference between it and this one is the plating finish. And you're write, it's a bit of an oversight to not even mention that upgrade.

Quote:
The Jean Paul USA TR-330 has a red brass lead pipe.

The Jean Paul website claims that their TR-330 has a yellow brass leadpipe in the short description, and rose brass in the specs. Are you sure it's rose brass?


Short description shows "yellow brass" but specs list shows "rose brass". We'll have to contact Jean Paul once more and confirm.

Quote:
Instrument brands which are that responsive is rare. And customer service becomes a relevant factor when exercising a warranty, as we’ll see.

This is a bit unfair towards a lot of other brands. Is Jean Paul's customer service better than say, Bach, Getzen or Yamaha's? Not to mention that with most of the major brands you often don't even need warranty.


I guess we should specify that compared with no-name brands, responsive customer support is rare.

Quote:
So if you later choose to resell the trumpet, as long as it’s still in decent condition, you can expect to recoup nearly half the cost of buying it new

Given that the Jean Paul is essentially competing with second hand Yamaha student trumpets, that's quite a bit. The second had Yamaha can probably be sold for nearly 100% of what you'd pay for a second hand one. And what's the reason for not buying a Jean Paul second hand, if that's 60% cheaper and they're so durable?


I see you point here. This is both a buying point and a renting point I suppose. While you're right, why not just rent at 60% the price, many people insist on buying new.

Quote:
And speaking of quality, another strength of Jean Paul USA is that their technical team inspects each instrument in the U.S. before shipping.
...
And sometimes trumpets ship with scratched finish, sticky valves or some other imperfection.


These 2 statements seem to be in direct contradiction. If Jean Paul inspects each instrument before shipping, how is it possible that they're shipped with defects?


You're right. And this point is quite obvious in hindsight. It's possible that Jean Paul checks each model but only pulls a random sample of each shipment for testing, which is a common practice among importers. But definitely best for us to contact the brand directly about this to confirm.

I accept your other points too. Thanks again for your time. [/i]
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hibidogrulez
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jenny Lee wrote:
Thanks again for your time.

You're welcome. Good luck with your site.
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Last edited by hibidogrulez on Mon Jun 07, 2021 9:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Jenny Lee
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@RETrumpet

Hi - Thanks for taking the time to read the article and offer your feedback--really appreciate it!

On those comments:

Quote:
Saxophones are woodwinds, not brass instruments. They are more closely related to flutes and clarinets than trumpets. As soon as I read this you lose credibility as instrument specialists instantly and I start to question everything else in the article.


Thanks for point out this oversight.

Quote:

When it comes to student trumpets, the ideal mouthpiece is usually one with a relatively small rim, giving the trumpeter greater control, and a large “C” cup, giving the trumpeter greater volume.

The rim comment is debatable but there's a lot of cause and effect stuff that your reader doesn't want/need to know, so it's probably okay as a generalization (IMO). However a C cup in the Bach system which is what is used by Jean Paul and many others is in the middle, it isn't "large". In fact, a 7C is a relatively small mouthpiece in the grand scheme. It's fine for many students, but it isn't large.


Yes, it seems you're right that the 7C type mouthpiece is about middle in terms of cup size. IIRC trumpet players will often prefer to move up to a larger size once they have a bit of experience.

Quote:
Thoroughly clean and oil the valves. Students should oil the valves even if playing a new trumpet for the first time.

Theoretically, valves have their tightest tolerances when they are new. New valves need to be oiled more often than older valves and should be wiped down every day to every few days (and then reoiled) to remove any fine metal shavings or other debris that can lead to the aforementioned stickiness. This is true for all brands. Again, probably too much info, but a more direct statement is probably needed. "Clean and oil your valves daily" or something to that effect. Ideally they do it everyday forever, but I'm a realist (and I don't even do that myself).


These details, as someone else suggested in this thread, would be great to include in a separate article on valve maintenance I think. And I agree with simplifying the message a bit to just say "clean and oil your valves daily" communicates the message more clearly.
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LittleRusty
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jenny Lee wrote:


LittleRusty wrote:
Given its low price and decent workmanship, the TR-330 doesn’t need(s) a massive commitment on the part of the student to justify the purchase due to the possible valve issues..

It is nice that the valve issues are so clearly stated. For me this is not just a no, but h*ll no, when it comes to an instrument. Even with a warranty the trumpet will be out of the player’s hands to fix. Weeks if it has to be shipped.


I'm not sure if I understand this point. It seems the TR-330 shouldn't require a major commitment simply because it's a small investment. On the other hand, a more expensive student model like, say, Bach, would probably warrant a bigger commitment from the student that they would play for a few years or more.

Don’t confuse investment, the cost of the instrument, with commitment of the student. The article specifically brings up student commitment which is what I was referring to.

The commitment, or determination, of the student needs to be high to push through the frustration of using an instrument with sticking valves.

On further reflection if the point the article is trying to make is basically, if your child is a flake you stand to lose fewer dollars with this low price option, then the wording is fine.

However, as a parent I always wanted to facilitate the success of my children. As such I would never place an instrument that could be frustrating in my child's hands knowing how hard it is to get them to stick with learning with the best possible tools.
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LittleRusty
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jenny Lee wrote:
So is it fair to say that plating requires more maintenance but offers better sound (thinner finish = better vibration)?

Based on the previous discussions I have read on here I would say no. There is a lot of debate among the community, which admittedly includes some qualified to offer their opinion and some not.

My take away is that for most people, and almost certainly a beginner who you are targeting, there is little discernable difference.

Even the concept that "better vibration" equals more desirable sound is debatable. The heavy instrument school of thought seems to believe that more vibration equals more energy lost, thus they add weight to the instrument in strategic areas to control that loss.
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JayKosta
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 9:00 am    Post subject: Re: Criteria for evaluating a new student trumpet? Reply with quote

Jenny Lee wrote:
...
Specifically, do these capture all the main considerations someone should have in mind when buying a student trumpet for someone: ...

------------------------------
I just now read through the article about the TR-330, and the issue of

"Musicians’ most common criticism of the TR-330 student trumpet is probably that it has sticky valves."

It is (or should be) a big concern of potential buyers. A trumpet with 'sticky valves' is NOT working correctly. And yes the problem can sometimes be fixed by cleaning and use of a different valve oil. But I think most people would not choose to buy a trumpet that has a reputation for 'sticky valves'.

It might be that the wording in the article DOES NOT mean that the TR-330 often has sticky valves, but it is a definite 'con' for the instrument and could easily result in a 'no sale'. Having good customer service and warranty is nice, but few people want to deal with it.

I suggest doing more thorough review of how often horns need to be returned because of sticky valves, and probably doing a re-write of the sections that mention it.
Yes, even top-shelf professional instruments occasionally have a problem with sticky valves that need to be repaired, but even with student models return of the instrument should be rare.
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Beyond16
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What I don't like about Jean Paul is the way they hide their product's country of origin, then tack 'USA' onto their name to fool people into thinking it's made in America. The price tells me that with luck, it's made in China. Otherwise India. I found their building on google street view. Nice building, though it just looks like office space. No visible Jean Paul sign anywhere. From my limited experience with Chinese trumpets, the valves should actually be their strength. A Chinese made Suzuki I briefly owned leaked in 3 different places, but the valves were great. Like Jean Paul, Suzuki didn't mention the country of manufacture. But an Alibaba search at the time confirmed it.
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OldSchoolEuph
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Jean Paul USA brand
Quote:
Based in the United States, Jean Paul USA is a fairly popular brand among trumpet players and other musicians.

“popular” is debatable. Well-selling, or common-place sure, but after they deteriorate rapidly, or the kid gets good enough to know the difference, not so popular anymore.
Quote:
The company not only manufactures trumpets and other brass instruments like trombones, but also woodwinds like saxophones, flutes and clarinets.

This is misleading. It implies US manufacture – it states manufacture. The company sources from non-US suppliers on an as-available basis. If it did not follow “US based”, it would be perhaps less misleading, but as is, it paints a false picture.
Quote:
Jean Paul USA instruments span the full range of competence—from student instruments like the TR-330, to intermediate and professional instruments. This is a common trait among higher-end brands and shows a deeper expertise and knowledge of quality than you’ll typically find in lesser-known brands.

Just because they say so in their marketing does not make the tr-860 a professional trumpet. Finding a pro who would touch one might. Good luck.
Quote:
And speaking of quality, another strength of Jean Paul USA is that their technical team inspects each instrument in the U.S. before shipping.

Why do you suppose this is necessary?
Quote:
Many musicians also appreciate the brand’s commitment to providing great after-sale service. I’ve personally contacted Jean Paul USA through their website and received helpful responses in under 24 hours.

Scenario: a 5 year old Jean-Paul intermediate horn. Dad tries to pull a stuck mouthpiece and twists the leadpipe into a corkscrew before shearing it in half (this happens a lot – and on every grade of student horn). What happens when you call them for a leadpipe for the model they sourced to a defunct Chinese plant 5 years ago?
Quote:
For these reasons, Jean Paul USA is generally a good brand that works hard to make sure their customers are happy with their instruments.

I can see why they would work hard to keep customers happy. Not how this makes them a “good brand” in itself.
Quote:
And the TR-330, like many Jean Paul USA instruments, tends to retain much of its value. So if you later choose to resell the trumpet, as long as it’s still in decent condition, you can expect to recoup nearly half the cost of buying it new.

This contradicts itself. Half is not much. Its also $100, which is not much.
Quote:
But fortunately, where properly oiling the valves hasn’t fixed this, Jean Paul USA has been quick to replace many of the effected instruments.

This speaks for itself – that just shouldn’t be neceasary.
Quote:
Bores typically range in size from about 0.455” to 0.470”.

Try 0.422” to 0.485”.
Quote:
Trumpets with a wider bore play louder but require more effort. Trumpets with a narrower bore play with less volume but are easier to play because less air is needed to produce a sound.

This statement is completely false. Delta pressure across the throat of the mouthpiece regulates volumetric flow – the bore size has nothing to do with it. Larger bore horns are often built lighter and more efficient, making them easier for many to play – except those that rely on greater resistance – for them not so much – but it’s a function of what is packaged with the bore, not the bore.
Quote:
The TR-330 model trumpet has a bore size of 0.459”. This is on the narrower side and is ideal for most students.

0.459” Is Bach ML bore, and pretty much the standard since World War II for most mainstream, sub-artist, horns. It is average, not narrow (and a calling a diameter narrow is a bit odd).
Quote:
Our biggest concern when it comes to trumpet durability is corrosion.

I disagree. With imports, falling apart due to poor manufacturing, improper soldering (or use of glue), contaminated alloys, and mis-sized parts is the most prevalent killer of cheap horns, not corrosion.
Quote:
The TR-330 is an overall durable student trumpet, especially for the price.

You say it, but you don’t back it with any meaningful statistics. Flawed engineering analysis does not prove durability, longevity in the field does. Where’s the data?
Quote:
Most trumpet lead pipes are made from gold brass, yellow brass or red brass (a.k.a. rose brass), each being an alloy with a different mix of copper and zinc.

You left out German-silver/nickel, and sterling silver – both of which are not uncommon. Also, red brass and rose brass are not the same thing – as your following sentence depends upon.
Quote:
The Jean Paul USA TR-330 has a red brass lead pipe.

Based on the ambiguity surrounding this with the brand, I suspect it depends which supplier they were buying from when your horn was made.
Quote:
Nickel-plated valves, are usually nickel-silver with a pure nickel plating.

Historically, this is not true. Lots of brass and bronze have been used for piston cores.
Quote:
A poor-quality plating is likely to flake off, which can cause the valves to stick over time

That is true, but placing it in the nickel section without indicating that historically nickel is the most common piston surface, and an abundance of nickel valves have performed for decades without any flaking is misleading.
Your blurb on monel completely ignores porosity issues that plagued some manufacturers until they abandoned monel. Pores from pockets left in the metal as it cooled become pits in the surface when machines, scavenge brass from the casing wall, and corrosively occlude to the casing. Monel valves can be good when done right, or bad when done wrong, just like nickel.
Quote:
Stainless steel has become the valve material of choice for many trumpet brands at the intermediate and professional level because its harder alloy offers a narrow tolerance for fitting within the casings, which can improve intonation.

This is a real stretch. The thermal expansion of the piston relative to the casing is what determines minimal tolerance capability, not the hardness of a piston plating. In fact, that hardness works against tighter tolerances by inhibiting thermal expansion while the brass moves more freely. Teflon over brass would probably be ideal for fit – but wouldn’t last a week. And, resistance is an even bigger issue with piston fit than intonation.
Quote:
When it comes durability, musicians normally prefer a plating because it lasts longer. Lacquers tend to be less expensive but can tarnish easily and need to be cleaned often. They’re also more susceptible to scratches and wear over time.

This might have been true in 1960, not so much with catalyzed epoxy finishes. Also, lacquer cannot tarnish, and modern epoxy cannot discolor. Silver plating requires the most cleaning, gold plating the least. Lacquer is in the middle.
Quote:
The TR-330 comes with a gold lacquer finish.

Since this is a section on durability, how is it that you overlook the inability to patch tinted lacquer after repairs? A tinted lacquer is ruined by the first incident – and buffing and refinishing one of these would cost enough to buy 3 or 4.
Quote:
A good student trumpet will have a bright tone that resonates without sounding shrill

No. A good student will. The horn only influences.
Your section that starts talking about intonation devolves into dark tone. This seems a separate thought?
Quote:
While you can get a warmer, darker tone with red brass, and even more so with silver,

That’s only true if that silver is heavy – and then it’s the mass, not the alloy. Silver bells add complexity to mid and upper overtone reflection into the flare, which adds sparkle and brilliance, which might not always be associated with “darker still”.
Quote:
Finally, trumpet bells are typically constructed in one of two ways:
1. One-piece bells are hammered into shape by hand. These tend to vibrate more freely and hence are more likely found in the best professional models.
2. Two-piece bells are welded together. These won’t vibrate quite as freely but are less expensive to make and most commonly found in beginner and intermediate models.

Wow, where to start. . . .OK, bells can be made 1-piece side-seam, 1-piece seamless extrusion (Olds UltraSonic), 1-piece seamless electroformed (Conn Coprion), 2-piece stamped-flare, 2-piece turned-flare, 2-piece gusseted. That’s a lot more than 2 ways.
All bells with seams are fused along the seam – 1 or 2 piece is unrelated. The only bells without seams are electroformed and extruded. All bells are annealed subsequent to seaming to re-orient the metal structure and negate any impact of seaming. 2-piece bells are not cheaper to make than many forms of 1-piece. My Taylor has a 2-piece bell and it’s a semi-custom boutique artist level horn, and I have student horns with seamless 1-piece bells. The 1-piece is pro, 2-piece is student non-sense is absurd.
Quote:
The TR-330 performs well enough that many advanced musicians will use it as a back up for a more expensive professional trumpet.

Name some.
Quote:
When you buy a new Jean Paul USA TR-330 student trumpet you also get a 1-year warranty that covers any manufacturing and quality defects with the instrument.

Well that says a lot. The horn I was practicing on during my vacation, and would perform on without hesitation (used another this pas Easter) is 97 years old. A trumpet should last more than 1 year.
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delano
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree 100% with OldSchoolEuph
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LittleRusty
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OldSchoolEuph wrote:

Quote:
Many musicians also appreciate the brand’s commitment to providing great after-sale service. I’ve personally contacted Jean Paul USA through their website and received helpful responses in under 24 hours.

Scenario: a 5 year old Jean-Paul intermediate horn. Dad tries to pull a stuck mouthpiece and twists the leadpipe into a corkscrew before shearing it in half (this happens a lot – and on every grade of student horn). What happens when you call them for a leadpipe for the model they sourced to a defunct Chinese plant 5 years ago?

I know you mentioned the intermediate model, but certainly for the student and possibly for the intermediate it might be cheaper to just buy a new horn when compared to the cost of a tech visit.
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Getzen
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Am I the only one that finds it very hard to believe the “author” of this article has ever actually seen a trumpet let alone played one? The amount of basic errors pointed out seriously brings into question his ability to write any kind of review. It reads more like an amalgamation of Amazon reviews lumped into one article.

This reminds me of any number of so called review websites for just about any product you can think of. A bunch of random statements about any particular brand designed to do nothing more than accumulate clicks. I feel sorry for any parent that uses this as a decision making tool.

I intentionally didn’t point out any mistakes myself. I don’t want to write their “review” for them or teach them how to write a more convincing version.

Oh and doesn’t it seem a little odd that someone claiming to use this forum for inspiration appears to have only joined to start this thread and has only posted in it? Honestly, I find this kind of misleading marketing/click bait offensive as a manufacturer and long time contributor of this site.
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LittleRusty
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Joined: 11 Aug 2004
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Getzen wrote:
Am I the only one that finds it very hard to believe the “author” of this article has ever actually seen a trumpet let alone played one? The amount of basic errors pointed out seriously brings into question his ability to write any kind of review. It reads more like an amalgamation of Amazon reviews lumped into one article.

This reminds me of any number of so called review websites for just about any product you can think of. A bunch of random statements about any particular brand designed to do nothing more than accumulate clicks. I feel sorry for any parent that uses this as a decision making tool.

I intentionally didn’t point out any mistakes myself. I don’t want to write their “review” for them or teach them how to write a more convincing version.

Oh and doesn’t it seem a little odd that someone claiming to use this forum for inspiration appears to have only joined to start this thread and has only posted in it? Honestly, I find this kind of misleading marketing/click bait offensive as a manufacturer and long time contributor of this site.

Brett,

Good points. I only contributed in the hopes that an honest description of the instrument might help the parents make a good decision.
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Crazy Finn
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Joined: 27 Dec 2001
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Getzen wrote:
Am I the only one that finds it very hard to believe the “author” of this article has ever actually seen a trumpet let alone played one? The amount of basic errors pointed out seriously brings into question his ability to write any kind of review. It reads more like an amalgamation of Amazon reviews lumped into one article.

This reminds me of any number of so called review websites for just about any product you can think of. A bunch of random statements about any particular brand designed to do nothing more than accumulate clicks. I feel sorry for any parent that uses this as a decision making tool.

I intentionally didn’t point out any mistakes myself. I don’t want to write their “review” for them or teach them how to write a more convincing version.

Oh and doesn’t it seem a little odd that someone claiming to use this forum for inspiration appears to have only joined to start this thread and has only posted in it? Honestly, I find this kind of misleading marketing/click bait offensive as a manufacturer and long time contributor of this site.

Agree 100%.

I thought this as well and therefore didn't feel like contributing to whatever endeavor this is.

I run into these websites all the time when searching for suggestions for other products. They're rarely useful and at least once contributed to me purchasing a computer keyboard that is, on a good day, barely adequate.
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hibidogrulez
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You’re not wrong. My first reaction was pretty much what you describe. However, in the spirit of constructive criticism, I figured I’d give them the benefit of the doubt. In hindsight that may have been the wrong thing to do.
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DJtpt31
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Joined: 02 Dec 2015
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Getzen wrote:
Am I the only one that finds it very hard to believe the “author” of this article has ever actually seen a trumpet let alone played one? The amount of basic errors pointed out seriously brings into question his ability to write any kind of review. It reads more like an amalgamation of Amazon reviews lumped into one article.

This reminds me of any number of so called review websites for just about any product you can think of. A bunch of random statements about any particular brand designed to do nothing more than accumulate clicks. I feel sorry for any parent that uses this as a decision making tool.

I intentionally didn’t point out any mistakes myself. I don’t want to write their “review” for them or teach them how to write a more convincing version.

Oh and doesn’t it seem a little odd that someone claiming to use this forum for inspiration appears to have only joined to start this thread and has only posted in it? Honestly, I find this kind of misleading marketing/click bait offensive as a manufacturer and long time contributor of this site.


Saying out loud what perhaps many of us on the sidelines reading this thread were thinking. Now that the cat is out of the bag... here is my 2 cents. My original thought was to say that everyone that made contributions or suggestions to the article should have gotten hired or compensated. You all put more time and research than the person who wrote it.
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