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Does Anyone Use Stamp with Caruso or other methods?



 
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1B
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2003 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am curious if anyone from the Stamp school has had any success incorporating Caruso, Gordon, etc. within your playing. I find that when I attempt to use any of these other methods, my buzzing is very tight, and I don't like my response. Most Stamp decendents (including myself) that I know of are classically trained. I am curious if there are any commercial players who come from the Stamp school. Also, I am limited to a high F as far as range, hence my experimentation with other methods. Anyone else have similar issues?
1B
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Quadruple C
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2003 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[ This Message was edited by: Quadruple C on 2003-09-20 16:34 ]
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kzem
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2003 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For many years I incorporated Stamp with Gordon. Sometimes I alternated days, or just made up my own hybrid of what seemed practical. I liked the pedals of both, and the buzzing of Stamp. But now, I'm trying to stick with one "system". I need more focus at this time-

Kurt Z
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JeroenJongeling
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2003 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I regularly switch between Stamp, Quinque, Colin and Gordon. Basically, I found that every method has exercises that work very good for me and a couple I have to avoid. Just get as many of the books as you can and use'm all. After a while you will know which work for you.

Good luck, Jeroen.
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rudas1
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2003 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the combination of Stamp with Caruso.

I find that Stamp is really great for overall centering and works very well in conjunction with Caruso. I find I have an easier time playing the stamp exercises after doing Caruso, which is odd but true. I found Stamp very difficult and frustrating to do as a warm-up after awhile, and went searching for something else. Now, I do stamp as a secondary routine, or later in the day as practice, instead of a warm-up, although I'm sure its very suitable as a warm-up for many people. Anyway, finding what works for you is whats its all about, and finding a good balance between various exercises/routines and between exercises and music.

Rudas
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JoseLindE4
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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2003 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a warmup I was given college that combines stamp and caruso. It starts with the 6 notes to get things set up right and then proceeds into the stamp warmup from the book (mpc scales to horn, ect). While I'm not very fond of it, many people I know found it very effective.

[ This Message was edited by: JoseLindE4 on 2003-05-12 23:29 ]
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wbing
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PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2003 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I studied with both Jimmy Stamp and Claude Gordon. They were both wonderful teachers, but for different reasons. Over the years, I have used both approaches and I find them to be compatible. In fact, I find them to compliment each other. Most importantly, both methods have helped many players over the years.

When I studied with Claude, he wasn't very keen on my keeping up with the Stamp approach, especially the buzzing. So, I focused on his material when I studied with him, knowing he had many fine students who had benefited from his teachings.

Jimmy, on the other hand, was more open minded about my studying with Claude. Mr. Stamp even wished me luck and hoped that I would enjoy my studies with Claude.

After studying with Claude for two years, I started working on my own and incorporating both methods into my practice routine.
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dbacon
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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2003 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

On 2003-05-25 01:57, wbing wrote:
I studied with both Jimmy Stamp and Claude Gordon. They were both wonderful teachers, but for different reasons. Over the years, I have used both approaches and I find them to be compatible. In fact, I find them to compliment each other. Most importantly, both methods have helped many players over the years.

When I studied with Claude, he wasn't very keen on my keeping up with the Stamp approach, especially the buzzing. So, I focused on his material when I studied with him, knowing he had many fine students who had benefited from his teachings.

Jimmy, on the other hand, was more open minded about my studying with Claude. Mr. Stamp even wished me luck and hoped that I would enjoy my studies with Claude.

After studying with Claude for two years, I started working on my own and incorporating both methods into my practice routine.




How would you characterize the difference in their teaching and the difference in their playing background? Stamp was more an orchestral player, Claude Gordon perhaps more of a big band/lead player. Both had some connection with Maggio and Clarke I believe.
Thanks for your posts on these two great trumpet teachers.

Dave Bacon
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wbing
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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2003 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As players, people, and teachers, Claude and Jimmy were completely different. Jimmy was quite laid back, whereas Claude was very structured.

Anyone who ever studied with Claude for any length of time received a large binder where Claude would write down your lesson plans. The stationary he used has his family crest and "Claude Gordon Music Enterprises" on the bottom of the paper. His lessons were clearly laid out and there never weas any doubt what I was supposed to practice. For my first lesson with Claude, and I'll never forget the words he said: "There's only one way to play the trumpet and that's the way I'm going to teach you"...he continued on with what were his main teaching points, such as "What to Practice, When to Practice, and How to Practice"...and he lived up to his words.

Jimmy, on the other hand, was very relaxed during his lessons (except when talknig about certain conductors!), often with his tie on, but with his shirt out... Jimmy could be intense, but the intensity was on the music, and his focus was always on the player and the sound coming out of the horn.

Claude seemed to belive strongly in a "formula" approach to his teaching and playing. After studying with him for a year, I got to the point where I could predict what my next assignment might be in the method books he loved...such as the Arban, Clarke, St. Jacome, and of course his books, Systematic Approach and Daily Routines. A regular, predictible, routine fit nicely with what was one of Claude's very strong points, and that was his skill at motivating a student. Always ready with a smile and a word of encourangement, I would leave Claude's knowing "what. when, and how" to pracitice.

Jimmy seemed to relate more directly to the current needs of the student. I felt that with Jimmy, if I had a particular problem in a piece of music, Jimmy would figure out a way to make it sound easier and better...I think he loved, as I do and so many other players and teachers, that half the fun of playing was figuring out how to solve a particular problem.

Guess that 's (more than?) enough for now...hope some of this is of interest....

Bill
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wbing
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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2003 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

On 2003-05-25 18:52, wbing wrote:
As players, people, and teachers, Claude and Jimmy were completely different. Jimmy was quite laid back, whereas Claude was very structured.

Anyone who ever studied with Claude for any length of time received a large binder where Claude would write down your lesson plans. The stationary he used has his family crest and "Claude Gordon Music Enterprises" on the bottom of the paper. His lessons were clearly laid out and there never weas any doubt what I was supposed to practice. For my first lesson with Claude, and I'll never forget the words he said: "There's only one way to play the trumpet and that's the way I'm going to teach you"...he continued on with what were his main teaching points, such as "What to Practice, When to Practice, and How to Practice"...and he lived up to his words.

Jimmy, on the other hand, was very relaxed during his lessons (except when talknig about certain conductors!), often with his tie on, but with his shirt out... Jimmy could be intense, but the intensity was on the music, and his focus was always on the player and the sound coming out of the horn.

Claude seemed to belive strongly in a "formula" approach to his teaching and playing. After studying with him for a year, I got to the point where I could predict what my next assignment might be in the method books he loved...such as the Arban, Clarke, St. Jacome, and of course his books, Systematic Approach and Daily Routines. A regular, predictible, routine fit nicely with what was one of Claude's very strong points, and that was his skill at motivating a student. Always ready with a smile and a word of encourangement, I would leave Claude's knowing "what. when, and how" to pracitice.

Jimmy seemed to relate more directly to the current needs of the student. I felt that with Jimmy, if I had a particular problem in a piece of music, Jimmy would figure out a way to make it sound easier and better...I think he loved, as I do and so many other players and teachers, that half the fun of playing was figuring out how to solve a particular problem.

Guess that 's (more than?) enough for now...hope some of this is of interest....

Bill
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dbacon
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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2003 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill,

Thanks for your insights!

Love your books, by the way. Bing Book is in my regular rotation of practice routines.

Have you seen Tony Plog's new books?

These will become standard practice material very soon.

Keep posting!

Dave Bacon
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wbing
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the positive feedback on my book. Always nice to hear...yes, I have working out of Tony's first volume, and I agree that it's an excellent work. I really look forward to the other volumes. Tony and I played together in the San Antonio Symphony. He was one of the hardest workers I've ever met. He also had a great sense of humor. His books will be a real gift to the brass world.
Bill
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wbing
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2003 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the positive feedback on my book. Always nice to hear...yes, I have working out of Tony's first volume, and I agree that it's an excellent work. I really look forward to the other volumes. Tony and I played together in the San Antonio Symphony. He was one of the hardest workers I've ever met. He also had a great sense of humor. His books will be a real gift to the brass world.
Bill
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trumpetherald
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2003 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think lots of people incorporate Stamp in with a variety of different things.

Stamp isn't a 'method.' It's rather a specific approach intended to solve the various difficulties trumpet players face, sound, technique, flexibility, etc. Because of that, it is something that you can apply to everything you do when you play.

The 'Daily Drills' book is similar to the Schlossberg - it's essentially a collection of exercises Jimmy used himself and with students. It was compiled at a seminar in Europe in the 70's by Thomas Stevens and Jean-Pierre Mathez (Editions BIM). As such, it's incomplete, because you can't get from the book exactly how Stamp had people perform the exercises.

Before he died, Stamp and Thom Stevens produced an audio tape which was intended to serve as a record of how Jimmy had his students perform the exercises, it may be possible still to find it (?). Also, some books have been released which try to further explain how to use the book, Roy Poper's book comes to mind.

TD
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fuzzyjon79
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2004 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm starting to incorporate more of Stamp's stuff into my routine... I have been doing Caruso for about a month now and they seem to work well together. I usually start with Caruso and then move on to Stamp routines. I also fit in some flexibility exercises from the Iron's book every now and then also.
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